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Musical worlds in Yogyakarta

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Book Series: Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde ISBN: 9789067183901 9789004253490 Year: Volume: 281/2 Pages: xii + 222 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_420987 Language: English
Publisher: Brill
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-07-06 00:00:00
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Musical worlds in Yogyakarta is an ethnographic account of a vibrant Indonesian city during the turbulent early post-Soeharto years. The book examines musical performance in public contexts ranging from the street and neighbourhood through to commercial venues and state environments such as Yogyakarta’s regional parliament, its military institutions, universities and the Sultan’s palace. It focuses on the musical tastes and practices of street workers, artists, students and others. From street-corner jam sessions to large-scale concerts, a range of genres emerge that cohere around notions of campursari (‘mixed essences’) and jalanan (‘of the street’). Musical worlds addresses themes of social identity and power, counterpoising Pierre Bourdieu’s
theories on class, gender and nation with the author’s alternative perspectives of inter-group social capital, physicality and grounded cosmopolitanism. The author argues that Yogyakarta is exemplary of how everyday people make use of music to negotiate issues of power and at the same time promote peace and intergroup appreciation in culturallydiverse inner-city settings.
Max M. Richter is director of the Monash Asia Institute and lecturer in Anthropology at Monash University, Australia. He has published in international journals and edited book collections, and has given presentations on Indonesian music and society in several countries and forums. His current research focuses on local-level music performance, intellectual/power-broker gatherings and centre/region identities in urban Indonesia.

The power of prophecy; Prince Dipanagara and the end of an old order in Java, 1785-1855

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Book Series: Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde ISBN: 9789067183031 Year: Volume: 249 Pages: Xxx+970 DOI: 10.1163/9789067183031 Language: English
Publisher: Brill
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-11 23:18:40
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National hero, Javanese mystic, pious Muslim and leader of the ‘holy war’ against the Dutch between 1825 and 1830, the Yogyakarta prince, Dipanagara (1785-1855, otherwise known as Diponegoro), is pre-eminent in the pantheon of modern Indonesian historical figures. Yet despite instant name recognition in Indonesia, there has never been a full biography of the prince’s life and times based on Dutch and Javanese sources. ‘The power of prophecy’ is a major study which sets Dipanagara’s life history against the context of the turbulent events of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century when the full force of European imperialism hit Indonesia like an Asian tsunami destroying forever Java’s ‘old order’ and propelling the twin forces of Islam and Javanese national identity into a fatal confrontation with the Dutch. This confrontation known as the Java War, in which Dipanagara was defeated and exiled, marked the beginning of the modern colonial period in Indonesia which lasted until the Japanese occupation of 1942-1945. The book presents a detailed analysis of Dipanagara’s pre-war visions and aspirations as a Javanese Ratu Adil (‘Just King’) based on extensive reading of his autobiography, the Babad Dipanagara as well as a number of other Javanese sources. Dutch and British records, in particularly the Residency Archives of Yogyakarta and Surakarta currently kept in the Indonesian National Archives, provide the backbone of this scholarly work. The book will be read with profit by all those interested in the rise of Western colonial rule in Indonesia, the fate of indigenous cultures in an age of imperialism and the role of Javanese Islam in modern Indonesian history. 
Peter Carey, Laithwaite tutor in History at Trinity College, Oxford, has made a lifetime study of Dipanagara and the history of early nineteenth century Java. His many works include the two-volume Archive of Yogyakarta (1980, 2000), The British in Java, 1811-1816; A Javanese account (1992) and Babad Dipanagara; An account of the outbreak of the Java War (1825-1830) (1981). He is one of Britain’s foremost historians of Southeast Asia and has also published on Cambodia, Burma and East Timor.

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