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Current challenges in photosynthesis: From natural to artificial

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192861 Year: Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-286-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Physiology --- Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:07
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Jules Verne (1828-1905), author of Around the World in Eighty Days (1873) and Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), wrote in 1875:"I believe that water will one day be used as a fuel, because the hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it, used separately or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light. I therefore believe that, when coal (oil) deposits are oxidised, we will heat ourselves by means of water. Water is the fuel of the future". Solar energy is the only renewable energy source that has sufficient capacity for the global energy need; it is the only one that can address the issues of energy crisis and global climate change. A vast amount of solar energy is harvested and stored via photosynthesis in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria since over 3 billion years. Today, it is estimated that photosynthesis produces more than 100 billion tons of dry biomass annually, which would be equivalent to a hundred times the weight of the total human population on our planet at the present time, and equal to a global energy storage rate of about 100 TW. The solar power is the most abundant source of renewable energy, and oxygenic photosynthesis uses this energy to power the planet using the amazing reaction of water splitting. During water splitting, driven ultimately by sunlight, oxygen is released into the atmosphere, and this, along with food production by photosynthesis, supports life on our earth. The other product of water oxidation is “hydrogen” (proton and electron). This ‘hydrogen’ is not normally released into the atmosphere as hydrogen gas but combined with carbon dioxide to make high energy containing organic molecules. When we burn fuels we combine these organic molecules with oxygen. The design of new solar energy systems must adhere to the same principle as that of natural photosynthesis. For us to manipulate it to our benefit, it is imperative that we completely understand the basic processes of natural photosynthesis, and chemical conversion, such as light harvesting, excitation energy transfer, electron transfer, ion transport, and carbon fixation. Equally important, we must exploit application of this knowledge to the development of fully synthetic and/or hybrid devices. Understanding of photosynthetic reactions is not only a satisfying intellectual pursuit, but it is important for improving agricultural yields and for developing new solar technologies. Today, we have considerable knowledge of the working of photosynthesis and its photosystems, including the water oxidation reaction. Recent advances towards the understanding of the structure and the mechanism of the natural photosynthetic systems are being made at the molecular level. To mimic natural photosynthesis, inorganic chemists, organic chemists, electrochemists, material scientists, biochemists, biophysicists, and plant biologists must work together and only then significant progress in harnessing energy via “artificial photosynthesis” will be possible. This Research Topic provides recent advances of our understanding of photosynthesis, gives to our readers recent information on photosynthesis research, and summarizes the characteristics of the natural system from the standpoint of what we could learn from it to produce an efficient artificial system, i.e., from the natural to the artificial. This topic is intended to include exciting breakthroughs, possible limitations, and open questions in the frontiers in photosynthesis research.

Synthesis and Applications of Nanomaterials for Photocatalysis and Electrocatalysis

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ISBN: 9783039288311 / 9783039288328 Year: Pages: 213 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-832-8 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Physics (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Heterogeneous catalysis, exploiting photo- and electrochemical reactions, has expanded rapidly in recent decades, having undergone various developments, especially from both energetic and environmental points of view. Photocatalysis plays a pivotal role in such applications as water splitting and air/water remediation. Electrocatalysis can be found in a large array of research fields, including the development of electroanalytical sensors, wastewater treatment, and energy conversion devices (e.g., batteries, fuel and solar cells, etc.). Therefore, the fine control of the synthetic procedures, together with extensive physicochemical characterisations of the tailor-made catalytic nanomaterials, are of fundamental importance to achieving the desired results. The present book will include recent enhancements in oxide/metal nanoparticles for photocatalytic and electrocatalytic applications, especially in the fields of pollutants abatement and energy conversion.

Electrochemical Surface Science: Basics and Applications

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ISBN: 9783039216420 9783039216437 Year: Pages: 398 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-643-7 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Chemistry (General) --- Inorganic Chemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Electrochemical surface science (EC-SS) is the natural advancement of traditional surface science (where gas–vacuum/solid interfaces are studied) to liquid (solution)/electrified solid interfaces. Such a merging between two different disciplines—i.e., surface science (SS) and electrochemistry—officially advanced ca. three decades ago. The main characteristic of EC-SS versus electrochemistry is the reductionist approach undertaken, inherited from SS and aiming to understand the microscopic processes occurring at electrodes on the atomic level. A few of the exemplary keystone tools of EC-SS include EC-scanning probe microscopies, operando and in situ spectroscopies and electron microscopies, and differential EC mass spectrometry (DEMS). EC-SS indirectly (and often unconsciously) receives a great boost from the requirement for rational design of energy conversion and storage devices for the next generation of energetic landscapes. As a matter of fact, the number of material science groups deeply involved in such a challenging field has tremendously expanded and, within such a panorama, EC and SS investigations are intimately combined in a huge number of papers. The aim of this Special Issue is to offer an open access forum where researchers in the field of electrochemistry, surface science, and materials science could outline the great advances that can be reached by exploiting EC-SS approaches. Papers addressing both the basic science and more applied issues in the field of EC-SS and energy conversion and storage materials have been published in this Special Issue.

Keywords

electrosynthesis --- switchable surfaces --- alkoxyamine surfaces --- redox monolayers --- porphyrins --- self-assembly --- surface nanostructures --- in situ EC-STM --- metal-electrolyte interface --- potential-dependent structures --- combined non-covalent control --- ECALE --- CdS --- silver single crystals --- alkanthiols --- SAMs --- EQCM --- AES --- polypyrrole --- diazonium salts --- flexible ITO --- adhesion --- redox properties --- X-ray absorption spectroscopy --- energy dispersive --- quick-XAS --- FEXRAV --- free electron laser --- electrochemistry --- photoelectrochemistry --- photochemistry --- pump &amp --- probe --- oxygen evolution reaction --- water splitting --- iridium --- thin-films --- spin-coating --- model systems --- electrocatalysts --- oxygen evolution reaction --- iridium --- nickel --- electrodeposition --- model catalyst --- water oxidation --- CO oxidation --- DFT --- hydrogen adsorption --- Pt–Ru catalysts --- ordered mesoporous carbons --- graphitization --- CO oxidation --- methanol oxidation --- direct methanol fuel cells --- electrocatalysis --- catalysts --- methanol oxidation reaction --- graphene --- DMFC --- Pt --- SOFC --- cathode --- XAFS --- in situ --- cobalt oxide --- water oxidation --- photo-electrochemistry --- hydroxyl radical --- electro-oxidation --- Lead OPD --- surface alloy --- XPS --- UPS --- EF-PEEM --- ORR --- Platinum --- PVDF --- PEMFC --- in situ ambient pressure XPS --- hard X rays --- photoelectron simulations --- solid/liquid interface --- TiO2 --- APTES --- Cu(111) --- electrochemical interface --- in-situ X-ray diffraction --- carbon nanofiber --- porous fiber --- electrospinning --- mesopore --- micropore --- porogen --- ammonia activation --- surface area --- methanol oxidation --- platinum single crystals --- pH and concentration effects --- adsorbed OH --- reduced graphene oxide --- electrophoretic deposition --- surface chemistry --- click chemistry --- gold --- palladium --- bimetallic alloy --- carbon nanofibers (CNFs) --- cyclic voltammetry (CV) --- Surface Modification --- Blackening of Steel --- Magnetite --- Corrosion Protection --- Auger-Electron Spectroscopy --- Ordered mesoporous carbon --- nitrogen doping --- cobalt-based electrocatalyst --- bifunctional oxygen electrode --- solvothermal method --- underpotential deposition (upd) --- Au --- Pt --- Pd --- nanoparticles --- cyclic voltammetry --- electrocatalysis --- operando --- near ambient pressure XPS --- scanning photoelectron microscopy --- solid oxide fuel cells --- surface science --- electrodeposited alloys --- CO electro-oxidation --- Pt single-crystal electrodes --- potential cycling --- potential stepping --- surface reconstruction --- electrocatalysis --- oxygen reduction --- ORR --- gas diffusion electrode --- platinum --- fuel cells --- thin-films --- benchmarking --- mass transport --- formic acid oxidation --- Au nanocrystals --- Pd thin films --- electrocatalysis --- d-band theory --- polymer --- silicon nanoparticles --- EPR spectroscopy --- photoconversion --- n/a

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