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Learning in Social Context: The Nature and Profit of Living in Groups for Development

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451821 Year: Pages: 87 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-182-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Abstract

One of the distinctive features of humans is their unique sociality. Humans live in organized societies that are characterized by a high level of interdependence of group members in various aspects of life, ranging from the economic phenomenon of labour division to providing emotional support to others. Under these circumstances, the capacity to track social connections within and between groups has great adaptive value in managing everyday life. We may understand the importance and adaptive value of tracking the scope of culturally shared knowledge if we consider the importance of cultural norms in guiding behaviour. To become a competent member of their cultural group one must be able to conform to the group's specific behavioural norms and to accumulate culturally shared knowledge. Acquiring this knowledge is essential for successful social interactions. In contrast to current dominant explanatory theories emphasizing that social category formation is simply rooted in humans’ need to belong and affiliate with a group, the aim of this e-book is to provide evidence that, in addition to its affiliative role, children form social categories for epistemic purposes. We show that children use specific cues, like kinship, patterns of resource allocation and consensus to understand group cohesion (Section 1). Once children figured out who is in-group and who is out-group, they show a significant in-group bias in attention, acting and learning (Section 2). Yet, this in-group bias can be attenuated by induced synchronous behavior (Section 3).

Understanding Game-based Approaches for Improving Sustainable Water Governance: The Potential of Serious Games to Solve Water Problems

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9783039287628 / 9783039287635 Year: Pages: 272 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-763-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering --- Environmental Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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The sustainable governance of water resources relies on processes of multi-stakeholder collaborations and interactions that facilitate knowledge co-creation and social learning. Governance systems are often fragmented, forming a barrier to adequately addressing the myriad of challenges affecting water resources, including climate change, increased urbanized populations, and pollution. Transitions towards sustainable water governance will likely require innovative learning partnerships between public, private, and civil society stakeholders. It is essential that such partnerships involve vertical and horizontal communication of ideas and knowledge, and an enabling and democratic environment characterized by informal and open discourse. There is increasing interest in learning-based transitions. Thus far, much scholarly thinking and, to a lesser degree, empirical research has gone into understanding the potential impact of social learning on multi-stakeholder settings. The question of whether such learning can be supported by forms of serious gaming has hardly been asked. This Special Issue critically explores the potential of serious games to support multi-stakeholder social learning and collaborations in the context of water governance. Serious games may involve simulations of real-world events and processes and are challenge players to solve contemporary societal problems; they, therefore, have a purpose beyond entertainment. They offer a largely untapped potential to support social learning and collaboration by facilitating access to and the exchange of knowledge and information, enhancing stakeholder interactions, empowering a wider audience to participate in decision making, and providing opportunities to test and analyze the outcomes of policies and management solutions. Little is known about how game-based approaches can be used in the context of collaborative water governance to maximize their potential for social learning. While several studies have reported examples of serious games, there is comparably less research about how to assess the impacts of serious games on social learning and transformative change.

Keywords

simulations --- serious games --- Q-method --- integrated water resources management --- policy analysis --- nexus --- participatory modelling --- serious game --- system dynamics --- water-food-land-energy-climate --- active learning --- drinking water --- role-play --- stakeholder collaboration --- Water Safety Plan --- water supply --- serious games --- social simulation --- social learning --- relational practices --- river basin management --- water governance --- multi-party collaboration --- stakeholders --- experimental social research --- Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) --- stakeholder participation --- serious game --- Blue Growth --- Good Environmental Status --- serious games (SGs) --- water management --- value change --- transcendental values --- social equity --- sustainability --- Schwartz’s Value Survey (SVS) --- Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) --- psychosocial perspectives --- decision-making processes --- assessment --- educational videogames --- online games --- water --- ecology education --- drinking water management --- peri-urban --- institutions --- gaming-simulation --- groundwater --- capacity building --- serious games --- planning support systems --- knowledge co-creation --- sustainability --- maritime spatial planning --- serious gaming --- flood --- urban --- rural --- infrastructure --- decision making --- serious games --- role-playing games --- learning-based intervention --- transformative change --- social learning --- aquaculture --- Mekong Delta --- mangrove --- gamification --- serious games --- water governance --- stakeholder participation --- sustainability --- game-based learning --- integrated water resource management (IWRM) --- natural resource management --- simulation --- serious game --- social learning --- stakeholder collaboration --- sustainability --- water governance

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