Search results: Found 8

Listing 1 - 8 of 8
Sort by
Recombinant protein expression in microbial systems

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192946 Year: Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-294-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Environmental Sciences --- Biotechnology --- General and Civil Engineering --- Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:07
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

With the advent of recombinant DNA technology, expressing heterologous proteins in microorganisms rapidly became the method of choice for their production at laboratory and industrial scale. Bacteria, yeasts and other hosts can be grown to high biomass levels efficiently and inexpensively. Obtaining high yields of recombinant proteins from this material was only feasible thanks to constant research on microbial genetics and physiology that led to novel strains, plasmids and cultivation strategies. Despite the spectacular expansion of the field, there is still much room for progress. Improving the levels of expression and the solubility of a recombinant protein can be quite challenging. Accumulation of the product in the cell can lead to stress responses which affect cell growth. Buildup of insoluble and biologically inactive aggregates (inclusion bodies) lowers the yield of production. This is particularly true for obtaining membrane proteins or high-molecular weight and multi-domain proteins. Also, obtaining eukaryotic proteins in a prokaryotic background (for example, plant or animal proteins in bacteria) results in a product that lack post-translational modifications, often required for functionality. Changing to a eukaryotic host (yeasts or filamentous fungi) may not be a proper solution since the pattern of sugar modifications is different than in higher eukaryotes. Still, many advances in the last couple of decades have provided to researchers a wide variety of strategies to maximize the production of their recombinant protein of choice. Everything starts with the careful selection of the host. Be it bacteria or yeast, a broad list of strains is available for overcoming codon use bias, incorrect disulfide bond formation, protein toxicity and lack of post-translational modifications. Also, a huge catalog of plasmids allows choosing for different fusion partners for improving solubility, protein secretion, chaperone co-expression, antibiotic resistance and promoter strength. Next, controlling culture conditions like temperature, inducer and media composition can bolster recombinant protein production. With this Research Topic, we aim to provide an encyclopedic account of the existing approaches to the expression of recombinant proteins in microorganisms, highlight recent discoveries and analyze the future prospects of this exciting and ever-growing field.

Engineering the Plant Factory for the Production of Biologics and Small-Molecule Medicines

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450510 Year: Pages: 377 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-051-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Biotechnology --- General and Civil Engineering --- Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Plant gene transfer achieved in the early ‘80s paved the way for the exploitation of the potential of gene engineering to add novel agronomic traits and/or to design plants as factories for high added value molecules. For this latter area of research, the term "Molecular Farming" was coined in reference to agricultural applications in that major crops like maize and tobacco were originally used basically for pharma applications. The concept of the “green biofactory” implies different advantages over the typical cell factories based on animal cell or microbial cultures already when considering the investment and managing costs of fermenters. Although yield, stability, and quality of the molecules may vary among different heterologous systems and plants are competitive on a case-to-case basis, still the “plant factory” attracts scientists and technologists for the challenging features of low production cost, product safety and easy scale up. Once engineered, a plant is among the cheapest and easiest eukaryotic system to be bred with simple know-how, using nutrients, water and light. Molecules that are currently being produced in plants vary from industrial and pharmaceutical proteins, including medical diagnostics proteins and vaccine antigens, to nutritional supplements such as vitamins, carbohydrates and biopolymers. Convergence among disciplines as distant as plant physiology and pharmacology and, more recently, as omic sciences, bioinformatics and nanotechnology, increases the options of research on the plant cell factory. “Farming for Pharming” biologics and small-molecule medicines is a challenging area of plant biotechnology that may break the limits of current standard production technologies. The recent success on Ebola fighting with plant-made antibodies put a spotlight on the enormous potential of next generation herbal medicines made especially in the name of the guiding principle of reduction of costs, hence reduction of disparities of health rights and as a tool to guarantee adequate health protection in developing countries.Plant gene transfer achieved in the early ‘80s paved the way for the exploitation of the potential of gene engineering to add novel agronomic traits and/or to design plants as factories for high added value molecules. For this latter area of research, the term "Molecular Farming" was coined in reference to agricultural applications in that major crops like maize and tobacco were originally used basically for pharma applications. The concept of the “green biofactory” implies different advantages over the typical cell factories based on animal cell or microbial cultures already when considering the investment and managing costs of fermenters. Although yield, stability, and quality of the molecules may vary among different heterologous systems and plants are competitive on a case-to-case basis, still the “plant factory” attracts scientists and technologists for the challenging features of low production cost, product safety and easy scale up. Once engineered, a plant is among the cheapest and easiest eukaryotic system to be bred with simple know-how, using nutrients, water and light. Molecules that are currently being produced in plants vary from industrial and pharmaceutical proteins, including medical diagnostics proteins and vaccine antigens, to nutritional supplements such as vitamins, carbohydrates and biopolymers. Convergence among disciplines as distant as plant physiology and pharmacology and, more recently, as omic sciences, bioinformatics and nanotechnology, increases the options of research on the plant cell factory. “Farming for Pharming” biologics and small-molecule medicines is a challenging area of plant biotechnology that may break the limits of current standard production technologies. The recent success on Ebola fighting with plant-made antibodies put a spotlight on the enormous potential of next generation herbal medicines made especially in the name of the guiding principle of reduction of costs, hence reduction of disparities of health rights and as a tool to guarantee adequate health protection in developing countries.

Replication-Competent Reporter-Expressing Viruses

ISBN: 9783038422587 9783038422594 Year: Pages: XVI, 322 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-10-31 16:58:45
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Recombinant viruses expressing reporter fluorescent or bioluminescent proteins are an excellent option to evaluate the dynamics of viral infection progression in both cultured cells and/or validated animal models of viral infection. Reporter proteins are valid surrogates for direct detection of infected cells in vitro and in vivo, without the use of secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. By eliminating the need of secondary labeling, tractable replicating-competent, reporter-expressing viruses provide an ideal approach to monitor viral infections in real time, representing a significant advance in the study of the biology of viruses, to evaluate vaccination approaches, and to identify new therapeutics against viral infections using high-throughput screening settings. In this Special Issue “Replication-Competent Reporter-Expressing Viruses” we review replication-competent, reporter-expressing viruses belonging to different families, methods of characterization, and applications to facilitate the study of in vitro and in vivo viral infections. We also seek to discuss disadvantages and limitations associated with these reporter-expressing viruses. Finally, we provide rational future perspectives and additional avenues for the development, characterization, and applications of recombinant, reporter-expressing, competent viruses.

Marine Glycobiology, Glycomics and Lectins

Author:
ISBN: 9783039218202 9783039218219 Year: Pages: 176 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-821-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Biochemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 16:39:37
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Glycans (carbohydrate chains) of marine creatures are rich and diverse in polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids. The chains that are metabolized by glycan-related enzymes (glycosyltransferases and glycosidases) are recognized by glycan-binding proteins (lectins) which regulate cellular processes such as growth, differentiation, and death. Marine glycomics that involves the genome and transcriptome accelerates our understanding of the evolution of glycans, glycan-related enzymes, and lectins. From 2017 to 2019, the Special Issue “Marine Glycobiology, Glycomics and Lectins” of the journal Marine Drugs published scientific articles and reviews, on the background of “glycobiology”—that is, glycan-based biosciences. The aim was to promote the discovery of novel biomolecules that contribute to drug development and clinical studies. This has great potential for establishing connections between the fields of both human health and marine life sciences.This book contains 11 scientific papers representing current topics in comprehensive glycosciences related to therapeutic agents from marine natural products, as outlined.

Looking Forward to the Future of Heparin: New Sources, Developments and Applications

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783038429494 9783038429500 Year: Pages: 282 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-950-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Chemistry (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:28
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue Looking Forward to the Future of Heparin: New Sources, Developments and Applications that was published in Molecules

Keywords

thrombin inhibition --- LMWH --- antithrombin --- heparin oligosaccharides --- ternary complex --- heparin --- hepcidin --- iron homeostasis --- anemia --- heparin-induced thrombocytopenia --- diagnosis --- functional assay --- platelets --- heparin --- heparan sulphate --- TGF-? --- bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) --- growth and differentiation factor (GDF) --- GDNF --- BMP antagonists --- noggin --- sclerostin --- gremlin --- heparin --- enoxaparin --- subarachnoid hemorrhage --- edema --- brain injury --- inflammation --- cisplatin --- low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) --- ovarian cancer --- resistance --- heparin --- glycosaminoglycans --- chondroitin sulfate --- perylene diimide dyes --- dermatan sulfate --- fluorescent probe --- Heparin Red --- assay --- dermatan sulfate --- human plasma --- heparin --- alginate --- sulfated alginate --- biomaterials --- heparin --- heparan sulfate --- serglycin --- proteoglycan --- recombinant expression --- bioreactor --- theranostics --- solid lipid nanoparticles --- iron oxide nanoparticles --- heparin coating --- intestinal lymphatic absorption --- heparin --- heparin process --- manufacturing methods --- industrial --- super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) --- hyaluronic acid (HA) --- bovine serum albumin (BSA) --- Fe3O4·DA-BSA/HA --- paclitaxel (PTX) --- magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) --- low-molecular-weight heparin --- dalteparin --- NMR --- LC-MS --- affinity chromatography --- danaparoid sodium --- low molecular weight glycosaminoglycans --- orthogonal multi-analytical methods --- sequence and compositional investigations --- component quantitative analysis --- heparin --- crude heparin --- NMR --- quantitative NMR --- PCA --- chemometric --- HSQC --- bovine heparin --- porcine heparin --- molecular weight --- size exclusion chromatography --- pharmacopeia --- Fondaparinux sodium --- extended physicochemical characterization --- qNMR --- single crystal X-ray structure --- reference standard --- iduronic acid conformation --- Arixtra® --- n/a --- n/a --- n/a

Synthetic DNA and RNA Programming

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039217342 9783039217359 Year: Pages: 188 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-735-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Dear Colleagues, Synthetic biology is a broad and emerging discipline that capitalizes on recent advances in molecular biology, genetics, protein and RNA engineering and omics technologies. These technologies have transformed our ability to reveal the biology of the cell and the molecular basis of disease.

Keywords

fluorescent reporter --- live cell imaging --- microRNA quantification --- optogenetics --- small molecule drug screening --- Escherichia coli --- recombinant protein production --- gene overexpression --- growth effect --- ASKA collection --- codon bias --- branched-chain amino acids --- gene ontology --- genetic code expansion --- protein kinase B --- phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1 --- phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase --- tRNASep --- alanyl-tRNA synthetase --- class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase --- expanded genetic code --- lysine acetylation --- posttranslational modification --- genetic code expansion --- transfer RNA --- synthetic biology --- non-canonical amino acids --- selenocysteine --- genetic code expansion --- release factor 1 --- amber stop codon suppression --- M. jannaschii orthogonal pair --- fluorescence-based screen --- cyclic peptides --- biopharmaceuticals --- mRNA display --- yeast two hybrid --- tRNASer --- mistranslation --- anticodon --- functional conservation --- alternative amino acid and nucleotide repertoires --- alternative core cellular chemistries --- biocontainment --- genetic firewall --- genetic isolation --- orthogonal central dogma of molecular biology --- synthetic life --- xenobiology --- genome engineering --- synthetic biology --- yeasts --- Metschnikowia --- genetic tools --- DNA delivery --- CUG-Ser --- reverse polymerization --- tRNA editing --- tRNA repair --- protein engineering --- synthetic biology --- tRNA --- misacylation --- indirect tRNA aminoacylation --- AspRS --- GluRS-like --- genetic code expansion --- genome synthesis --- genome editing --- microRNA --- protein modification --- RNA metabolism --- tRNA --- synthetic biology --- unnatural amino acids --- unnatural nucleotides

Arthropod Venom Components and Their Potential Usage

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039285402 9783039285419 Year: Pages: 404 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-541-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Public Health --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:09
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Thousands of arthropod species, ranging from arachnids (spiders and scorpions) to hymenopterans (ants, bees, and wasps) and myriapods (centipedes), are venomous and use their venoms for both defense and predation. These venoms are invariably harmful to humans, and some may cause serious injuries, e.g., those from scorpions, spiders, and wasps. Arthropods’ venoms are also known as rich sources of biologically active compounds and have attracted the attention of toxin researchers for years. In this century, venom component analysis has progressed considerable due to the advances in analytical techniques, in particular, mass spectrometry and next-generation deep (DNA and RNA) sequencing. As such, proteomic and peptidomic analyses using LC–MS have enabled the full analysis of venom components, revealing a variety of novel peptide and protein toxins sequences and scaffolds, potentially useful as pharmacological research tools and for the development of highly selective peptide ligands and therapeutic leads, like chlorotoxin. Due to their specificity for numerous ion-channel subtypes, including voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, arthropod neurotoxins have been investigated to dissect and treat neurodegenerative diseases and control epileptic syndromes. This Special Issue collects information on such progress, encouraging contributions on the chemical and biological characterization of venom components, not only peptides and proteins, but also small molecules, their mechanisms of action, and the development of venom-derived peptide leads.

Keywords

ant --- venom --- mass spectrometry analysis --- pilosulin-like peptide --- phospholipases D --- metalloproteases --- Loxosceles spp. --- recombinant toxins --- hybrid immunogen --- neutralizing antibodies --- antivenoms --- LyeTxI-b --- Staphylococcus aureus --- keratitis --- AMP --- mastoparan --- Acinetobacter baumannii --- stent --- cantharidin --- blister beetle --- Berberomeloe majalis --- nematicide --- ixodicide --- antifeedant --- scorpion venom --- insecticidal peptide --- mass spectrometric analysis --- de novo sequencing --- Centruroides limpidus Karch --- proteome --- scorpion --- transcriptome --- venom toxicity --- brown spider --- venom --- Loxosceles --- toxins --- biotools --- drug targets --- novel therapeutics --- spider toxin --- directed disulfide bond formation --- Nav channel activity --- Nav1.7 --- pain target --- automated patch-clamp --- bee venom --- alternative treatment --- skin --- cutaneous disease --- mechanism --- chemotherapy --- cold allodynia --- mechanical allodynia --- melittin --- neuropathic pain --- oxaliplatin --- natural antibiotics --- piperidine heterocyclic amines --- industrial biotechnology --- LTQ Orbitrap Hybrid Mass Spectrometer --- myrmecology --- venom --- pain --- ants --- wasps --- bees --- Hymenoptera --- envenomation --- toxins --- peptides --- pharmacology --- Dinoponera quadriceps --- Formicidae --- Hymenoptera venom --- proteomics --- venom allergens --- ICK-like toxins --- melittin --- insect immune system --- apoptosis --- heart contractility --- Tenebrio molitor --- bee venom --- bioinformatics --- computational docking --- homology modelling --- ion channel structure --- protein–peptide interactions --- tertiapin --- venom peptides --- virtual screening --- small hive beetle --- solitary wasp --- venom --- antimicrobial peptide --- linear cationic ?-helical peptide --- amphipathic ?-helix structure --- channel-like pore-forming activity --- antimicrobial peptide --- venom --- arthropod --- malaria --- Chagas disease --- human African trypanosomiasis --- leishmaniasis --- toxoplasmosis --- venom peptides --- FMRF-amide --- insect neurotoxin --- protons --- pH regulation --- acid-sensing ion channels --- acid-gated currents --- chronic pain --- ICK peptide --- knottins --- NaV --- spider venom --- voltage-gated sodium channel --- n/a

Marine Bioactive Peptides: Structure, Function, and Therapeutic Potential

Author:
ISBN: 9783039215324 9783039215331 Year: Pages: 442 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-533-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This Special Issue Book, “Marine Bioactive Peptides: Structure, Function, andTherapeutic Potential"" includes up-to-date information regarding bioactivepeptides isolated from marine organisms. Marine peptides have been found invarious phyla, and their numbers have grown in recent years. These peptidesare diverse in structure and possess broad-spectrum activities that have greatpotential for medical applications. Various marine peptides are evolutionaryancient molecular factors of innate immunity that play a key role in host defense.A plethora of biological activities, including antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral,anticancer, anticoagulant, endotoxin-binding, immune-modulating, etc., makemarine peptides an attractive molecular basis for drug design. This Special IssueBook presents new results in the isolation, structural elucidation, functionalcharacterization, and therapeutic potential evaluation of peptides found inmarine organisms. Chemical synthesis and biotechnological production of marinepeptides and their mimetics is also a focus of this Special Issue Book.

Keywords

sea cucumber --- ACE-inhibitory peptide --- molecular docking --- structure-activity relationship --- plastein reaction --- Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis --- ACE-inhibitory activity --- peptide --- molecular docking --- SHRs --- prostate cancer --- Anthopleura anjunae oligopeptide --- DU-145 cells --- PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway --- cod skin --- NA-inhibitory peptide --- influenza virus --- neuraminidase --- molecular docking --- adsorption --- host defense peptide --- antimicrobial peptide --- anti-LPS factor --- host?microbe relationship --- functional diversity --- invertebrate immunity --- crustacean --- antimicrobial activity --- antimicrobial peptide --- polychaeta --- innate immunity --- BRICHOS domain --- recombinant peptide --- ?-helix --- Rana-box --- nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) --- antimicrobial peptide --- cytotoxicity --- ?-hairpin --- polyphemusins --- tachyplesins --- cell death --- signaling pathways --- Neptunea arthritica cumingii --- multi-functional peptides --- antioxidant activity --- ACE-inhibitory activity --- anti-diabetic activity --- Arenicola marina --- antimicrobial peptides --- arenicin --- complement --- C3a --- acid-sensing ion channel --- animal models --- pain relief --- toxin --- Ugr 9-1 --- APETx2 --- hairtail (Trichiurus japonicas) --- muscle --- peptide --- antioxidant activity --- half-fin anchovy hydrolysates --- Maillard reaction products --- antibacterial peptide --- identification --- self-production of hydrogen peroxide --- membrane damage --- Perinereis aibuhitensis --- decapeptide --- lung cancer --- cell proliferation --- apoptosis --- conotoxins --- conopeptides --- computational studies --- molecular dynamics --- machine learning --- docking --- review --- drug design --- ion channels --- Conus --- conotoxin --- transcriptome sequencing --- phylogeny --- venom duct --- abalone --- peptide --- vasculogenic mimicry --- metastasis --- MMPs --- HIF-1? --- dexamethasone --- myotube atrophy --- protein synthesis --- proteolytic system --- Pyropia yezoensis peptide --- PYP15 --- QAGLSPVR --- antihypertensive effect --- Caco-2 cell monolayer --- transport routes --- oyster zinc-binding peptide --- peptide-zinc complex --- caco-2 cells --- intestinal absorption --- zinc bioavailability --- Chlorella pyrenoidosa protein hydrolysate (CPPH) --- Chlorella pyrenoidosa protein hydrolysate-calcium chelate (CPPH-Ca) --- calcium absorption --- gene expression --- gut microbiota --- cone snails --- conotoxins --- ion channels --- function --- structure --- marine peptides --- arenicin-1 --- molecular symmetry --- structure–activity relationship --- antibacterial --- cytotoxic --- chemical synthesis --- molecular dynamics --- tilapia --- HUVEC --- angiotensin II --- NF-?B --- Nrf2 --- endothelial dysfunction --- conotoxin --- cone snail --- Conus --- Conus ateralbus --- Kalloconus --- n/a

Listing 1 - 8 of 8
Sort by
Narrow your search