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Prebiotics and Probiotics

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ISBN: 9783038971689 9783038971696 Year: Pages: 486 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-169-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2018-09-19 11:22:00
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The purpose of this Special Issue, “Prebiotics and Probiotics”, is to focus on the importance of intestinal microbiota for human health and disease and the possibilities of influencing its composition and function with probiotics and prebiotics.The goal is to clarify that the microbiome in the maternal fetal and during pediatric age, as well as the immediate changes that occur as new microbes are acquired postnatally play major roles in subsequent health and disease. Rapidly developing technologies for multi-omic analyses and systems biology are shifting paradigms in both scientific knowledge and clinical care.Finally, the idea will be to provide health professionals with comprehensive, understandable and highly readable updated information on the intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics.]

Keywords

microbiota --- prebiotics --- probiotics

Bifidobacteria and Their Role in the Human Gut Microbiota

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451005 Year: Pages: 242 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-100-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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The human intestine is home of an almost inconceivable large number of microorganisms. The human gut microbiota can therefore be pictured as an organ placed within a host organism. The human gut microbiome, which in total may contain >100 times the number of genes present in our genome, endows us with functional features that we did not have to evolve ourselves. It is recognized that intestinal microbiota plays an important role in human health and disease. In fact, gut bacteria other than metabolize dietary components, may play complex roles such as modulation of the immune system and in reduction of gut infections. Variations in the presence and/or abundance of certain components of the intestinal microbiota have repeatedly been observed in patients that suffer from atopic diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis, colon cancer and diabetes. In this context, bifidobacteria represent one of the most common bacterial members of the human gut microbiota. Bifidobacteria are anaerobic, Gram-positive, irregular or branched rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the gastro-intestinal tracts (GIT) of humans, especially during the first stages of life and most animal and insects. Bifidobacterial fluctuations seem directly associated with health effects and for these reasons they are being exploited as health-promoting or probiotic bacteria. However, despite the extensive commercial exploitation of bifidobacteria as probiotic bacteria, little is known about their impact or dependency on other members of the human gut microbiota or on their host. Genome analyses have highlighted the existence of gene repertoires encoding products that are responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria to the human intestine and intense research efforts at international level are ongoing to understand the molecular details of these interactions. Specifically, the molecular interactions that are presumed to exist between bifidobacteria and the human host, as well as interactions between different residents of intestinal microbiota are the main topic of bifidobacterial research communities.

Model organisms in inflammation and cancer

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193707 Year: Pages: 83 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-370-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Internal medicine --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-19 16:29:12
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A link between inflammation and cancer was initially made by Rudolf Virchow back in the 19th century. Nowadays many cancers are considered dependent on inflammatory responses to microbial and damaged-self stimuli and both arms of immunity, innate and adaptive, are playing a role in promoting cancer. Moreover, besides environmental factors, opportunistic pathogens contribute to inflammation and cancer. Nevertheless, microbial influence on chronic disease is sometimes difficult to discern, especially in the context of polymicrobial communities, such as those found in the digestive tract. In this light, model organisms provide important insights into immune and growth signals that promote cancer, and suggest therapies that will selectively target potentially harmful microbes or modulate host responses. A number of review and opinion articles in this series address novel aspects and paradigms of the interactions between the microbiota and the host in relation to inflammation and cancer.

Keywords

Drosophila --- human --- mouse --- innate immunity --- microbiota --- Hologenome --- diet --- aging

Obesity and Diabetes: Energy Regulation by Free Fatty Acid Receptors

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197477 Year: Pages: 45 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-747-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Internal medicine --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Food intake regulates energy balance and its dysregulation leads to metabolic disorder, such as obesity and diabetes. During feeding, free fatty acids (FFAs) are not only essential nutrients but also act as signaling molecules in various cellular processes. Recently, several orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that act as FFA receptors (FFARs) have been identified; GPR40/FFAR1, GPR119, and GPR120 are activated by medium- and long-chain FFAs. GPR84 is activated by medium-chain FFAs. GPR41/FFAR3 and GPR43/FFAR2 are activated by short-chain FFAs. These FFARs have come to be regarded as new drug targets for metabolic disorder such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, because a number of pharmacological and physiological studies have shown that these receptors are primarily involved in the energy metabolism in various tissues; insulin secretion, gastrointestinal hormone secretion, adipokine secretion, regulation of inflammation, regulation of autonomic nervous system, relation to gut microbiota, and so on. This Research Topic provides a comprehensive overview of the energy regulation by free fatty acid receptors and a new prospect for treatment of metabolic disorder such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Understanding Crohn's Disease: Immunity, Genes and Microbes

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452149 Year: Pages: 126 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-214-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-13 14:57:01
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Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory bowel disease resulting in considerable morbidity and reduced quality of life. Although still under intense debate, CD seems to result from an enhanced and uncontrolled immune response to the gut microbiota. CD is thought to be multifactorial depending on genetic and environmental determinants. In recent years, nearly 100 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with increased risk of developing CD (some of the SNPs also associated with susceptibility to ulcerative colitis, another type of IBD). These SNPs are mostly located in genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms, such as autophagy, expression of pattern-recognition receptors and citokine signaling. Epigenetics is also probably playing a role in CD susceptibility, as it is sensitive to environmental conditions and may mediate gene-environment interactions. Environmental factors possibly involved in CD development include diet, gut microbiota composition and infection with specific pathogens, of which the most consistently associated to CD are Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and adherent-invasive Escherichia coli. This Topic aimed at bringing together contributions covering different genetic, epigenetic, immunological and microbial processes involved in the development of CD, helping to drive forward the understanding of CD immunopahtology.

Nutrition and Allergic Diseases

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ISBN: 9783038428497 9783038428503 Year: Pages: VIII, 256 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-20 15:57:56
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The purpose of this Special Issue, “Nutrition and Allergic Diseases”, is to provide an overview of the role of nutrition in allergy. The prevalence of asthma, rhinitis, and food allergy has increased tremendously over the last few decades. Is there a role for nutrition to help managing this global challenge? This Special Issue touches upon the many aspects that relate to nutrition and allergy and focuses on two fundamental questions:1) Can nutrition play a role in allergy prevention and induction?2) Can nutrition play a role in managing allergies?The topics covered range from the epidemiology of nutrition and allergy prevalence to the description of food components known to have beneficial effects on allergy, and include the importance of pregnancy and breastfeeding, the possibility of therapeutically targeting the microbiota in allergic diseases (with pre- or probiotics), the allergic effects of food processing, food allergies and related available treatments.

About the Foodborne Pathogen Campylobacter

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453887 Year: Pages: 221 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-388-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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A significant increase in the prevalence of campylobacteriosis cases has been observed over the past years. Campylobacter has emerged as the leading cause of bacterial foodborne disease worldwide with a significant impact on human health and an associated economic burdens. Campylobacteriosis human cases have been generally correlated with the handling, preparation and consumption of poultry. In 2017, the European Commission regulation has amended Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 on the hygiene of foodstuffs as regards Campylobacter on broiler carcasses stating a limit of 1000 cfu/g. Campylobacter is also present in other farm animals and is frequently found on a range of foodstuffs due to cross contamination. Among the pathogenic species, C. jejuni is the most prevalent species followed by C. coli. Current guidelines highlight the importance of biosecurity but these measures are failing to mitigate the risk of pathogenic Campylobacter. As an obligate microaerophile, Campylobacter does not multiply under atmospheric oxygen concentration at ambient temperatures. It therefore constitutes a puzzle as to how it can survive from farm to retail outlets. The underlying molecular mechanisms of persistence, survival and pathogenesis appear to be unique to this pathogen. Recent research has indicated how genomic polymorphism, restricted catabolic capacity, self regulation or deregulation of genes, bacterial cooperation and unknown contamination routes may be connected to this specificity.This book includes original studies on both C. jejuni and C. coli species dealing with epidemiology and animal carriage, host interaction, control strategies, metabolism and regulation specificities of these two pathogenic species, methodology to improve cultural techniques and chicken gut microbiota challenged with Campylobacter.

Plynųjų kirtimų poveikis pušynų ekosistemoms ir būdai joms stabilizuoti : mokslinės-praktinės rekomendacijos

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9786094673603 Year: Pages: 30 p. DOI: https://doi.org/10.7220/9786094673603 Language: Lithuanian
Publisher: Vytautas Magnus University
Subject: Forestry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-21 08:11:19
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Intensity of forest exploitation increased due to the expanding of use of timber and cutting residues in last years. Changes of the environmental conditions after clear cuttings were very significant, and considerable decline of understory plant and forest entomofauna species was determined. Forest soils were effected by wind and rain in the clear-cutted territories, and fertility of soils depended on the residues in the cutted plots. The presented recommendations are based on the results of the project „Study of impact of clear cuttings on biodiversity dynamics in forest ecosystems“, financed by Grant SIT-1/2015 from the Research Council of Lithuania.

The Interplay of Microbiome and Immune Response in Health and Diseases

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039216468 / 9783039216475 Year: Pages: 206 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-647-5 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
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[Increasing evidence suggests that microbiota and especially the gut microbiota (the microbes inhabiting the gut including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi) plays a key role in human physiology and pathology. Recent findings indicate how dysbiosis—an imbalance in the composition and organization of microbial populations—could severely impact the development of different medical conditions (from metabolic to mood disorders), providing new insights into the comprehension of diverse diseases, such as IBD, obesity, asthma, autism, stroke, diabetes, and cancer. Given that microbial cells in the gut outnumber host cells, microbiota influences human physiology both functionally and structurally. Microbial metabolites bridge various—even distant—areas of the organism by way of the immune and hormone system. For instance, it is now clear that the mutual interaction between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain (gut–brain axis), often involves gut microbiota, indicating that the crosstalk between the organism and its microbial residents represents a fundamental aspect of both the establishment and maintenance of healthy conditions. Moreover, it is crucial to recognize that beyond the intestinal tract, microbiota populates other host organs and tissues (e.g., skin and oral mucosa). We have edited this eBook with the aim of publishing manuscripts focusing on the impact of microbiota in the development of different diseases and their associated treatments.]

Keywords

microbiota --- rheumatoid arthritis --- anti-TNF-? --- methotrexate --- etanercept --- disease activity --- microbiome --- health --- precision medicine --- genomics --- bacteriocins --- bacteriophages --- antibiotics --- gastrointestinal diseases --- dysbiosis --- gut barrier --- gut microbiota --- virus --- vaginal microbiota --- HIV --- HPV --- HSV2 --- cytokines --- chemokines --- innate immunity --- adaptive immunity --- microbiota --- autoimmunity --- etiopathogenesis --- Candida albicans --- 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyBenzaldehyde --- melanin --- colitis --- anaerobic bacteria --- aerobic bacteria --- gut microbiota --- gut-liver axis --- chronic liver diseases --- fecal transplantation --- probiotics --- gut microbiota --- immunological niche --- dysbiosis --- cancer --- immune system --- cutaneous immunity --- microbiome --- Staphylococcus spp., T cells --- Staphylococcus aureus --- Staphylococcus epidermis --- commensals --- atopic dermatitis --- intravenous immunoglobulin G --- colitis --- dextran sulfate sodium --- mice --- inflammation --- cytokines --- Candida albicans --- Escherichia coli --- Enterococcus faecalis --- gut microbiota --- chemo free treatment --- lymphoid malignancies --- 16S rRNA gene --- chondroitin sulfate disaccharide --- co-occurrence network --- global network --- microbial interactions --- microbiome --- modularity --- superoxide dismutase --- gut microbiota --- macrophages --- TLR mimicry --- immune epigenetics --- metabolism --- sterile inflammation --- microbiota --- microbiome --- immunotherapy --- adoptive cell transfer (ACT) --- CAR T-cell --- TCR --- TIL --- checkpoint inhibitors --- immuno-oncology --- cancer --- diet --- n/a

How Salmonella infection can inform on mechanisms of immune function and homeostasis

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197996 Year: Pages: 143 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-799-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-03 17:04:57
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The use of model antigens such as haptens and ovalbumin has provided enormous insights into how immune responses develop, particularly to vaccine antigens. Furthermore, these studies are overwhelmingly performed in animals housed in clean facilities and are not known to have experienced overt clinical signs caused by infectious agents. Therefore, this is unlikely to reflect the impact more complex host-pathogen interactions can have on the host, nor the diversity in how immunity is regulated. Humans develop immune responses in the context of the periodic exposure to multiple pathogens and vaccines over a life-time. These are likely to have a long-lasting effect on who and what we are and how we respond to further antigen challenge. Therefore, studies on how infection influences immune homeostasis and how the development of responses to a pathogen reflects what is known on immune regulation will be informative on how we can translate findings from our standard models into treatments usable in humans. One organism allows us to do just this. Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are devastating human pathogens. Nevertheless, many aspects of the diseases they cause can be successfully modelled in murine systems so that the infection is either resolving or non-resolving. This has the advantage of allowing the long-term impact of infection on immune function to be assessed. We propose to welcome key workers to write about their research that examine the consequence of Salmonella infection on the host and the elements of the bacterium that contribute to this.

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