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Mechanisms of Neuronal Migration during Corticogenesis

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198863 Year: Pages: 183 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-886-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Abstract

The cerebral cortex plays central roles in many higher-order functions such as cognition, language, consciousness, and the control of voluntary behavior. These processes are performed by the densely interconnected networks of excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, and the balanced development of these two types of neuron is quite important. During cortical development, pyramidal neurons and interneurons show quite different migratory behaviors: radial migration and tangential migration, respectively. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the ventricular zone of the dorsal telencephalon, and migrate radially along radial glial fibers toward the pial surface, forming a six-layered cortical structure in an “ inside-out” manner. On the other hand, cortical interneurons are generated in the medial and caudal ganglionic eminence in the ventral telencephalon, and follow long tangential migratory paths into the cortex. Defects in these migration processes result in abnormalities in the cortical layer structure and neuronal networks, which may cause various neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Accordingly, besides basic scientific interest, elucidation of the mechanism of neuronal migration is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases. This Research Topic includes a series of articles ranging from the basic mechanism of neocortical development to the malformation and evolution of the neocortex. We do hope that the present ebook will further stimulate the interest in the fascinating investigations of neuronal migration and corticogenesis.

Experimental models of early exposure to alcohol: a way to unravel the neurobiology of mental retardation

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194728 Year: Pages: 104 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-472-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Pediatrics --- Psychiatry --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:33
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Excessive alcohol drinking represents a major social and public health problem for several countries. Alcohol abuse during pregnancy leads to a complex syndrome referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), chiefly characterized by mental retardation. The effects of early exposure to ethanol can be reproduced in laboratory animals and this helped to answer several key questions concerning the human pathology. The interest of experimental models of FASD is twofold. First, they increase our knowledge about the dose and modality of alcohol consumption able to induce damaging effects on the developing brain. Second, experimental models of FASD can provide useful hints to elucidate the basic mechanisms leading to the intellectual disability. In fact, experimental exposure to alcohol can be carried out during discrete, often very restricted, time windows. As a consequence, FASD models, though depending on the multifaceted interference of alcohol with several molecular pathways, can provide valuable information about which specific developmental periods and brain areas are critically involved in the genesis of mental retardation. Putting together data obtained through several experimental paradigms of alcohol exposure and those deriving from other genetic and non-genetic models, one can figure out to what extent different types of mental retardation share common pathogenetic mechanisms. The present Research Topic is aimed at establishing the state of the art of the current research on experimental FASD, focusing on differences and homologies with other types of intellectual disability. The ultimate goal is to find out a common roadmap in view of future therapeutical approaches.

Cerebral endothelial and glial cells are more than bricks in the Great Wall of the brain: Insights into the way the blood-brain barrier actually works (Celebrating the centenary of Goldman's experiments)

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195725 Year: Pages: 186 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-572-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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When Ehrlich discovered the first evidence of the blood-brain barrier in 1885, he probably did not perceive the Great Wall that remained hidden from consciousness inside the central nervous system. Ehrlich had observed that acidic vital dyes did not stain the brain if they were injected into the blood stream. A century ago (1913), Goldman showed that the injection of trypan blue in the cerebrospinal fluid stained only the brain, but not the other organs. For almost a century it was thought that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) consisted in a physical barrier, resulting from the restricted permeability of the cerebral endothelial cell layer, as they are joined by tight junctions. However, as scientists are always looking for news in what is already discovered, in the end of the 20th century we had evidences that cerebral endothelial and glial cells express several drug metabolizing enzymes consisting in a second protection system: a metabolic barrier. Furthermore, the drugs and their metabolites must overcome the activity of several multidrug resistance proteins that function as ATP-dependent efflux pumps, consisting in the third line of defence: the active barrier. Therefore, the way the BBB actually works should be better explained. Several endogenous compounds, as well as xenobiotics, may be activated by enzymes of the metabolic barrier, generating reactive oxygen species that could damage neurons. Therefore, endothelial and glial cells possess endogenous protecting compounds and enzymes against oxidants, consisting in an antioxidant barrier. When all these systems fail, glial cells, mainly microglia, secrete cytokines in an attempt to crosstalk with defence cells asking for help, which consists in an immune barrier. In cerebral regions that are devoid of the physical barrier, such as circumventricular organs, the metabolic, active, antioxidant and immune barriers are reinforced. It is important to understand how cells involved in the BBB interact with one another and the dynamic mechanisms of their functions. This Research Topic published in this e-Book considers recent highlights in BBB structure, cell and molecular biology, biotransformation, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, immunology and how these basic knowledges can be applied in drug discovery and clinical researches, rewriting what is already written, and paving the way that goes to the Great Wall in the Frontiers of the Brain in this new century that is just beginning.

New Advances on Zika Virus Research

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ISBN: 9783038977643 Year: Pages: 552 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-765-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Internal medicine --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 10:34:31
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Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne member of the Flaviviridae family that historically has been associated with mild febrile illness. However, the recent outbreaks in Brazil in 2015 and its rapid spread throughout South and Central America and the Caribbean, together with its association with severe neurological disorders—including fetal microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults—have changed the historic perspective of ZIKV. Currently, ZIKV is considered an important public health concern that has the potential to affect millions of people worldwide. The significance of ZIKV in human health and the lack of approved vaccines and/or antiviral drugs to combat ZIKV infection have triggered a global effort to develop effective countermeasures to prevent and/or treat ZIKV infection. In this Special Issue of Viruses, we have assembled a collection of 32 research and review articles that cover the more recent advances on ZIKV molecular biology, replication and transmission, virus–host interactions, pathogenesis, epidemiology, vaccine development, antivirals, and viral diagnosis.

Keywords

Ziks virus --- silvestrol --- antiviral --- eIF4A --- hepatocytes --- flavivirus --- arbovirus --- Zika --- sexual transmission --- testis --- prostate --- Zika virus --- ZIKV --- rhesus macaques --- Non-human primates --- NHP --- infection --- natural history --- Asian-lineage --- African-lineage --- zika virus --- ZIKV–host interactions --- viral pathogenesis --- cell surface receptors --- antiviral responses --- viral counteraction --- cytopathic effects --- microcephaly --- ZIKV-associated neurologic disorders --- Zika virus --- serology --- flavivirus --- microsphere immunoassay --- validated --- optimised --- dengue virus --- ZIKV --- reporter virus --- cryptic promoter silencing --- full-length molecular clone --- subgenomic replicon --- plasmid toxicity --- Zika virus --- dengue viruses --- flavivirus --- ELISA --- indirect immunofluorescence --- plaque reduction neutralization test --- polymerase chain reaction --- cross-reactions --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- infectious cDNA --- replication --- gene expression --- neuropathogenesis --- viral genetic variation --- host genetic variation --- flavivirus --- Zika virus --- therapy --- host-directed antivirals --- Aedes aegypti --- RNA-seq --- insecticide resistance --- Zika virus --- detoxification and immune system responses --- Zika virus --- mosquito-borne flavivirus --- emerging arbovirus --- outbreak control --- molecular diagnostics --- laboratory preparedness --- assay standardization --- external quality assessment --- EQA --- QCMD --- flavivirus --- eye --- zika virus --- blood-retinal barrier --- ocular --- innate response --- Zika virus --- pregnancy --- fetal infection --- congenital Zika syndrome --- Asian lineage --- Zika virus --- Full-length cDNA infectious clones --- Bacterial artificial chromosome --- NS2A protein --- Zika virus --- neural progenitor cells --- neurons --- Zika virus --- antivirals --- therapeutics --- research models and tools --- flavivirus --- Zika virus (ZIKV) --- reverse genetics --- infectious clone --- full-length molecular clone --- bacterial artificial chromosome --- replicon --- infectious RNA --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- arbovirus --- sexual transmission --- host genetic variation --- immune response --- Zika virus --- flaviviruses --- vaccines --- virus like particles --- clinical trials --- ZIKV --- NS1 protein --- Zika virus --- diagnosis --- monoclonal antibodies --- ELISA --- zika virus --- placenta cells --- microglia cells --- siRNA --- TLR7/8 --- Zika --- viral evolution --- genetic variability --- Bayesian analyses --- Zika virus --- reverse genetics --- infectious cDNA --- Tet-inducible --- MR766 --- FSS13025 --- flavivirus --- ZIKV --- NS5 --- type I IFN antagonist --- point-of-care diagnostics --- isothermal nucleic acid amplification --- nucleic acid computation --- nucleic acid strand exchange --- zika virus --- mosquito --- mosquito surveillance --- multiplex nucleic acid detection --- boolean logic-processing nucleic acid probes --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- astrocytomas --- dsRNA --- viral fitness --- antiviral --- heme-oxygenase 1 --- Zika virus --- viral replication --- Zika virus --- antiviral compounds --- neural cells --- viral replication --- flavivirus --- Zika virus --- viral persistence --- testicular cells --- testes --- Zika virus --- prM-E proteins --- viral pathogenicity --- virus attachment --- viral replication --- viral permissiveness --- viral survival --- apoptosis --- cytopathic effects --- mutagenesis --- chimeric viruses --- human brain glial cells --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- microRNAs --- neurons --- neuroinflammation --- anti-viral immunity --- Zika virus --- dengue virus --- secondary infections --- cross-reactions --- IgA --- IgG avidity tests

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