Search results: Found 17

Listing 1 - 10 of 17 << page
of 2
>>
Sort by
George III: King and politicians 1760-1770

Author:
ISBN: 9780719064289 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2011-11-04 00:00:00
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The eighteenth century was for long described as 'the classical age of the constitution' in Britain. The prevailing impression was one of cabinet government based on a two-party system of Whigs and Tories in Parliament, and a monarchy whose powers had been emasculated by the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. This simple picture was destroyed in 1929 when Sir Lewis Namier published The structure of politics at the accession of George III. In this canonical work, he demonstrated that the monarchy was far more than simply a cipher and that no such party system existed, finding rather that the political divide in Parliament was of an administration comprising a court party and some political factions facing an opposition of other factions, with the votes of independent MPs divided and fluctuating between the two. In this fascinating book Peter D. G. Thomas, Namier's last research student, continues the political story into the first decade of the reign of George III. One of the most controversial figures in modern British history, the King has often been blamed for the loss of Britain's American colonies in an attempt to restore royal power. However, through an analysis of key politicians and ministries of the period, the author here uses Namier's findings to demonstrate that George III was not seeking to advance royal power, and throws light on the extent to which a system of party politics was in operation. In addition, although the structure of British politics revealed by Namier provides the setting for this study, America, India and Ireland are also considered here as important issues of the time. Providing the first chronological survey of power politics and policy-making in the first ten years of George III's reign, this book will be invaluable to all undergraduates studying eighteenth-century British history.

Keywords

politics --- britain --- monarchy --- georgian

Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582492 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-09-28 11:01:22
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Bibliography (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

PART II: PREAMBLE (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Delivering Post-Mortem ‘Harm’: Cutting the Corpse (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

The Condemned Body Leaving the Courtroom (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Preface (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

In Bad Shape: Sensing the Criminal Corpse (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

PART I: Introduction (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Abbreviations (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Listing 1 - 10 of 17 << page
of 2
>>
Sort by