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Dietary and Non-Dietary Phytochemicals and Cancer

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ISBN: 9783038423799 9783038423782 Year: Pages: XII, 144 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-379-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-09 09:53:53
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The role of many phytochemicals in the modulation of the carcinogenesis process has been well documented by combining in vitro and animal studies, as well as epidemiological evidence. When acting in synergy, phytochemicals exert potential anti-cancer properties and much progress has been made in defining their many biological activities at the molecular level. However, an interesting feature in the field of phytochemicals and cancer is the role of some phytochemicals in promoting cancer development. This Special Issue of Toxins aims to provide a comprehensive look at the contribution of dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals to cancer development and at the molecular mechanisms by which phytochemicals inhibit or promote cancer. These aspects are extremely useful for the definition of efficient preventive measures against cancer.

Chemically-Induced DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and Cancer

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ISBN: 9783038971290 9783038971306 Year: Pages: X, 264 Language: Englisch
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-08-27 13:43:27
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Human cancers frequently arise from exposure to chemicals, although radiation, oxidation, and genetic factors play critical roles as well. DNA damage by these agents in a cell is an important first step in the process of carcinogenesis. DNA repair processes have evolved to repair these damages. However, the replication of damaged DNA may occur frequently prior to repair, resulting in gene mutations and the generation of altered proteins. Mutations in an oncogene, a tumor-suppressor gene, or a gene that controls the cell cycle give rise to a clonal cell population with an advantage in proliferation. The complex process of carcinogenesis includes many such events, but has been generally considered to be comprised of the three main stages known as initiation, promotion, and progression, which ultimately give rise to the induction of human cancer. The articles published in this book entitled “Chemically-Induced DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and Cancer” provide an overview on the topic of the “consequence of DNA damage” in the context of human cancer with their challenges and highlights.

30 years of the Comet Assay: an overview with some new insights

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196494 Year: Pages: 174 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-649-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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By means of this ‘Frontiers in Genetics’ research topic, we are celebrating 30 years of the Comet Assay. The first paper on this single-cell gel electrophoresis assay was published in 1984 by O. Ostling and K.J. Johanson (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. Vol.123: 291-298). The comet assay is a versatile and sensitive method for measuring single - and double-strand breaks in DNA. By including lesion-specific enzymes in the assay, its range and sensitivity are greatly increased, but it is important to bear in mind that their specificity is not absolute. The comet assay (with and without inclusion of lesion-specific enzymes) is widely used as a biomarker assay in human population studies - primarily to measure DNA damage, but increasingly also to assess the capacity of cells for DNA repair. Ostling and Johanson (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 1984) were also the first to report experiments to measure DNA repair, by simply following the decrease of DNA damage over time after challenging cells with ionising radiation. However, this approach is time-consuming and laborious as it requires an extended period of cell culture and is therefore not ideal for biomonitoring studies, which typically require high-throughput processing of many samples. As an alternative approach, the in vitro comet-based repair assay was developed: a cell extract is incubated with a DNA substrate containing specific lesions, and DNA incisions accumulate. The in vitro comet-based repair assay has been modified and improved over the past decade: it was first devised to measure base excision repair of oxidised purines in lymphocytes (Collins et al., Mutagenesis, 2001), but has since been adapted for other lesions and thus other repair pathways, as well as being applied to tissue samples in addition to cell suspensions. Even after 30 years, the comet assay is still in a growth phase, with many new users each year. Many questions are repeatedly raised, which may seem to have self-evident answers, but clearly, it is necessary to reiterate them for the benefit of the new audience, and sometimes being forced to think again about old topics can shed new light. Different applications of the comet assay are discussed in this special issue, including: genotoxicity testing in different organisms, human biomonitoring, DNA repair studies, environmental biomonitoring and clinical studies. Furthermore, we consider and where possible answer questions, including the ones raised by Raymond Tice at the 8th International Comet Assay Workshop in Perugia (Italy 2009): What is the spectrum of DNA damage detected by the various versions of the comet assay?; What are the limitations associated with each application?; What should be done to standardize the assay for biomonitoring studies?; Can the comet assay be used to monitor changes in global methylation status?; What cell types are suitable for detecting genotoxic substances and their effects in vivo and in vitro?; Can the assay be fully automated?; and more. So this ‘Frontiers in Genetics’ research topic is written for the beginner as well as for the experienced users of the comet assay.

Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins: New Advances and Future Challenges

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ISBN: 9783039218387 / 9783039218394 Year: Pages: 246 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-839-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Cyanobacteria are a group of ubiquitous photosynthetic prokaryotes. Their occurrence has been increasing worldwide, due to anthropogenic activities and climate change. Several cyanobacterial species are able to synthesize a high number of bioactive molecules, among them, cyanotoxins (microcystins, cylindrospermopsin, nodularin, etc.), which are considered a health concern. For risk assessment of cyanotoxins, more scientific knowledge is required to perform adequate hazard characterization, exposure evaluation and, finally, risk characterization of these toxins. This Special Issue “Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins: New Advances and Future Challenges” presents new research or review articles related to different aspects of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, and contributes to providing new toxicological data and methods for a more realistic risk assessment.

Keywords

cylindrospermopsin --- in vitro --- cytotoxicity --- oxidative stress --- genotoxicity --- microcystins --- taste-and-odor compounds --- water source --- drinking water treatment plant --- cyanobacterial thresholds --- arctic --- benthic mats --- cyanotoxins --- ELISA --- 16S rRNA gene --- apoptosis --- microcystin-LR (MC-LR) --- reproductive toxicity --- resveratrol --- sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) --- Aphanizomenon flos-aquae --- blue-green algae supplements --- cyanotoxins --- microcystin --- cylindrospermopsin --- saxitoxin --- cylindrospermopsin --- monoclonal antibody --- time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay --- method validation --- detection --- cyanobacteria --- cyanotoxins --- nutrient enrichment --- akinetes --- harmful algal blooms --- PCR --- phylogenetic analyses --- microcystin-LR --- Procambarus clarkii --- energy budget --- astaxanthin --- cylindrospermopsin --- anatoxin-a --- PSP toxins --- microcystins --- cyanobacteria --- Nostocales --- drinking water --- marine cyanobacteria --- cyanotoxins --- marine sponges --- secondary metabolites --- marine natural compounds --- bioassays --- Artemia salina --- Paracentrotus lividus --- hemolytic essay --- reservoir --- Yangtze estuary --- 16S rRNA gene sequencing --- shotgun metagenomic sequencing --- bacterial community --- microbial metabolisms --- [d-Leu1]Microcystin-LR --- Lithobates catesbeianus --- tadpoles --- exposure --- Histopathological evaluation --- microcystins --- cylindrospermopsin --- method validation --- UPLC-MS/MS --- lettuce --- genotoxicity --- mutagenicity --- Cylindrospermopsin --- Microcystin-LR --- mixture

Effects of Mycotoxins on the Intestine

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ISBN: 9783038977827 9783038977834 Year: Pages: 262 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-783-4 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2019-05-09 17:16:14
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Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several fungal species. They can contaminate human food and animal feed, and have been a threat for thousands of years. The gastrointestinal tract is the first target when ingesting mycotoxin-contaminated food or feed. As unlikely as it sounds, the investigations concerning the effects of mycotoxins on the intestine are still in their early stages. This book gathers the most recent advances related to the characterization of the intestinal toxicity of mycotoxins. Substantial data assembled on the damage caused to a number of histological structures and functions of the intestine remove any remaining doubt about this organ being a primary target for the toxicity of mycotoxins. An interesting overview of the detrimental effects of mycotoxins on the gut-hosted microbiota—now regarded as a fully-fledged organ associated with the gut—is also given. Finally, outstanding contributions in this book address questions relating to the suitability of current regulations to protect against alterations of the intestine, and to the efficacy assessment of new detoxification strategies using the intestinal toxicity of mycotoxins as a relevant endpoint.

Keywords

mice --- aflatoxin B1 --- intestinal bacterial flora --- response --- Clostridium sp. WJ06 --- deoxynivalenol --- pig --- intestinal morphology --- microbial diversity --- aflatoxin M1 --- ochratoxin A --- intestinal epithelial cells --- tight junction --- permeability --- ileum --- jejunum --- deoxynivalenol --- piglet --- contaminated feed --- tight junction --- aflatoxin B1 --- small intestine --- histopathological lesions --- ultrastructural changes --- toll-like receptors --- T-2 toxin --- enteric nervous system --- pig --- vasoactive intestinal polypeptide --- mycotoxins --- zearalenone --- deoxynivalenol --- histology --- ultrastructure --- large intestine --- pig --- Claviceps --- liver --- digestive tract --- mycotoxin --- sclerotia --- ergot alkaloids --- toxicity --- deoxynivalenol --- Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii CNCM I-1079 --- intestine --- transcriptome --- inflammation --- oxidative stress --- lipid metabolism --- fumonisin --- microbiota --- pigs --- MiSeq 16S rDNA sequencing --- intestinal microbiota --- hydrogen-rich water --- lactulose --- Fusarium mycotoxins --- piglets --- functional oligosaccharides --- mycotoxins --- swine --- explant technique --- intestinal morphology --- goblet cells --- deoxynivalenol --- zearalenone --- pig --- colon microbiota --- Lactobacillus --- detoxification --- zearalenone --- doses --- caecal water --- genotoxicity --- pre-pubertal gilts --- atlantic salmon --- deoxynivalenol --- feed --- intestine --- PCR --- proliferating cell nuclear antigen --- suppressor of cytokine signaling --- tight junctions --- Zearalenone --- N-acetylcysteine --- SIEC02 cells --- Mitochondrial apoptosis --- n/a

Seaweeds Secondary Metabolites: Successes in and/or Probable Therapeutic Applications

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ISBN: 9783039283002 9783039283019 Year: Pages: 320 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-301-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Nutrition and Food Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:08
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Seaweeds are recognized as highly nutritious, and their use in gastronomy is increasing. Their health benefits and their potential to prevent several diseases have also been established. In this Special Issue several health effects are discussed, with more emphasis on their antitumor activity and potential use to treat Alzheimer’s disease. The key bioactive metabolites, from which phlorotannins can be highlighted, are presented, as well as some important in vivo studies. Altogether, the chapters provide in-depth information about the biological activities of seaweed metabolites, contributing to elucidate the health effects of seaweed.

Keywords

Padina pavonica --- osteosarcoma --- apoptosis --- algae --- chemo-preventive agent --- phytol --- fucosterol --- fatty acid --- laurinterol --- Laurencia --- antitumoral --- breast cancer explants --- organotypic culture --- ex vivo --- phlorotannin --- eckmaxol --- high-speed counter-current chromatography --- NMR spectroscopy --- mass spectrometry --- isolation and purification --- Ecklonia maxima --- fucoidan --- age-related macular degeneration --- VEGF --- oxidative stress --- Saccharina latissima --- Fucus vesiculosus --- Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens --- Fucus serratus --- Laminaria digitata --- Symphyocladia latiuscula --- bromophenols --- mushroom tyrosinase --- B16F10 --- melanin --- red seaweed --- bioactives --- extraction --- biorefinery --- seaweed --- gut microbiota --- prebiotics --- dietary fibre --- complex polysaccharides --- polyphenols --- polyunsaturated fatty acids --- carotenoids --- phytochemicals --- Padina pavonica --- marine algae --- osteoporosis --- bone metabolism --- bone health --- nutraceutical --- Bifurcaria bifurcata --- linear diterpenes --- extraction --- identification --- biological activities --- macroalgae --- high value applications --- phlorotannin --- amyloid-? aggregation --- insulin glycation --- dynamic simulation --- kidney --- ischemia-reperfusion injury --- Ecklonia cava --- phlorotannins --- Alzheimer’s disease --- seaweeds --- cholinesterases --- beta-secretase --- beta-amyloid aggregation --- neuroprotection --- K14HPV16 --- genotoxicity assay --- papillomavirus --- cancer --- seaweeds --- hyperpigmentation --- skin aging --- skincare --- photo-protection --- seaweeds --- secondary metabolites --- in vivo studies --- clinical trials --- health effects --- dieckol --- eckol --- fucoxanthin --- kahalalide F

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