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Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-Relative SUMO in DNA Damage Response

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454419 Year: Pages: 183 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-441-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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DNA damage response (DDR) is a term that includes a variety of highly sophisticated mechanisms that cells have evolved in safeguarding the genome from the deleterious consequences of DNA damage. It is estimated that every single cell receives tens of thousands of DNA lesions per day. Failure of DDR to properly respond to DNA damage leads to stem cell dysfunction, accelerated ageing, various degenerative diseases or cancer. The sole function of DDR is to recognize diverse DNA lesions, signal their presence, activate cell cycle arrest and finally recruit specific DNA repair proteins to fix the DNA damage and thus prevent genomic instability. DDR is composed of hundreds of spatiotemporally regulated and interconnected proteins, which are able to promptly respond to various DNA lesions. So it is not surprising that mutations in genes encoding various DDR proteins cause embryonic lethality, malignancies, neurodegenerative diseases and premature ageing. The importance of DDR for cell survival and genome stability is unquestionable, but how the sophisticated network of hundreds of different DDR proteins is spatiotemporally coordinated is far from being understood. In the last ten years ubiquitin (ubiquitination) and the ubiquitin-relative SUMO (sumoylation) have emerged as essential posttranslational modifications that regulate DDR. Beside a plethora of ubiqutin and sumo E1-activating enzymes, E2-conjugating enzymes, E3-ligases and ubiquitin/sumo proteases involved in ubiquitination and sumoylation, the complexity of ubiqutin and sumo systems is additionally increased by the fact that both ubiquitin and sumo can form a variety of different chains on substrates which govern the substrate fate, such as its interaction with other proteins, changing its enzymatic activity or promoting substrate degradation. The importance of ubiquitin/SUMO systems in the orchestration of DDR is best illustrated in patients with mutations in E3-ubiquitin ligases BRCA1 or RNF168. BRCA1 is essential for proper function of DDR and its mutations lead to triple-negative breast and ovarian cancers. RNF168 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which creates the ubiquitin docking platform for recruitment of different DNA damage signalling and repair proteins at sites of DNA lesion, and its mutations cause RIDDLE syndrome characterized by radiosensitivity, immunodeficiency and learning disability. In addition, recently discovered the ubiquitin receptor protein SPRTN is part of the DNA replication machinery and its mutations cause early-onset hepatocellular carcinoma and premature ageing in humans. Despite more than 700 different enzymes directly involved in ubiquitination and sumoylation processes only few of them are known to play a role in DDR. Therefore, we feel that the role of ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-related SUMO in DDR is far from being understood, and that this is the emerging field that will hugely expand in the next decade due to the rapid development of a new generation of technologies, which will allow us a more robust and precise analyses of human genome, transcriptome and proteome. In this Research Topic we provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of ubiquitin and SUMO pathways in all aspects of DDR, from DNA replication to different DNA repair pathways, and demonstrate how alterations in these pathways cause genomic instability that is linked to degenerative diseases, cancer and pathological ageing.

Mobile Genetic Elements in Cellular Differentiation, Genome Stability, and Cancer

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453894 Year: Pages: 123 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-389-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Biology --- Science (General) --- Chemistry (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-22 11:50:10
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The human genome, as with the genome of most organisms, is comprised of various types of mobile genetic element derived repeats. Mobile genetic elements that mobilize by an RNA intermediate, include both autonomous and non-autonomous retrotransposons, and mobilize by a “copy and paste” mechanism that relies of the presence of a functional reverse transcriptase activity. The extent to which these different types of elements are actively mobilizing varies among organisms, as revealed with the advent of Next Generation DNA sequencing (NGS).To understand the normal and aberrant mechanisms that impact the mobility of these elements requires a more extensive understanding of how these elements interact with molecular pathways of the cell, including DNA repair, recombination and chromatin. In addition, epigenetic based-mechanisms can also influence the mobility of these elements, likely by transcriptional activation or repression in certain cell types. Studies regarding how mobile genetic elements interface and evolve with these pathways will rely on genomic studies from various model organisms. In addition, the mechanistic details of how these elements are regulated will continue to be elucidated with the use of genetic, biochemical, molecular, cellular, and bioinformatic approaches. Remarkably, the current understanding regarding the biology of these elements in the human genome, suggests these elements may impact developmental biology, including cellular differentiation, neuronal development, and immune function. Thus, aberrant changes in these molecular pathways may also impact disease, including neuronal degeneration, autoimmunity, and cancer.

Mechanisms of Mitotic Chromosome Segregation

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ISBN: 9783038424031 9783038424024 Year: Pages: VIII, 332 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-05-10 09:52:09
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This book describes current knowledge about the mechanisms by which cells segregate their already duplicated chromosomes in preparation for cell division. Experts in the field treat several important aspects of this subject: (1) the history of research on mitotic mechanisms, to serve as a background; (2) assembly of the mitotic spindle; (3) Kinetochore assembly and function; (4) the mechanisms of chromosome congression to the metaphase plate; (5) the spindle assembly checkpoint; (6) mechanisms to avoid and correct erroneous chromosome attachments to the spindle; (7) a molecular perspective on spindle assembly in land plants; (8) chromosome segregation in anaphase A; (9) spindle elongation in anaphase B; and (10) the consequences of errors in chromosome segregation. Each chapter provides the reader with a comprehensive and accurate picture of current research in a form that is both readable and authoritative. The volume is suitable for scholars in this and related fields and for teaching at an advanced level.

G-quadruplex and Microorganisms

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ISBN: 9783039212439 9783039212446 Year: Pages: 208 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-244-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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G-quadruplexes (G4s) are nucleic acids secondary structures that form in DNA or RNA guanine (G)-rich strands. In recent years, the presence of G4s in microorganisms has attracted increasing interest. In prokaryotes, G4 sequences have been reported in several human pathogens. Bacterial enzymes able to process G4s have been identified. In viruses, G4s have been suggested to be involved in key steps of the viral life cycle: They have been associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), human papilloma virus, swine pseudorabies virus, and other viruses’ genomes. New evidence shows the presence of G4s in parasitic protozoa, such as the causative agent of malaria. G4 binding proteins and mRNA G4s have been implicated in the regulation of microorganisms’ genome replication and translation. G4 ligands have been developed and tested both as tools to study the complexity of G4-mediated mechanisms in the viral life cycle and as therapeutic agents. Moreover, new techniques to study G4 folding and their interactions with proteins have been developed. This Special Issue will focus on G4s present in microorganisms, addressing all the above aspects.

Molecular Advances in Wheat and Barley

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ISBN: 9783039213719 9783039213726 Year: Pages: 290 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-372-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Allohexaploid bread wheat and diploid barley are two of the most cultivated crops in the world. This book reports novel research and reviews concerning the use of modern technologies to understand the molecular bases for wheat and barley improvement. The contributions published in this book illustrate research advances in wheat and barley knowledge using modern molecular techniques. These molecular approaches cover genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and phenomic levels, together with new tools for gene identification and the development of novel molecular markers. Overall, the contributions for this book lead to a further understanding of regulatory systems in order to improve wheat and barley performance.

Keywords

Triticum durum --- Aegilops tauschii --- Triticum aestivum --- marker-trait associations --- genes --- bread wheat --- genetic biofortification --- favorable alleles --- allohexaploid --- homoeolog --- hybrid necrosis --- molecular marker --- wheat --- wheat --- rye --- 6R --- small segment translocation --- powdery mildew --- transgenic wheat --- 12-oxophytodienoate reductase --- jasmonates --- freezing tolerance --- HIGS --- transgene --- wheat --- barley --- cereal cyst nematodes --- wheat --- barely --- breeding --- biotechnology --- resistance --- Triticum aestivum --- Landrace --- Powdery mildew --- Bulked segregant analysis-RNA-Seq (BSR-Seq) --- Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) --- Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP) --- Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici --- protein two-dimensional electrophoresis --- mass spectrometry --- Pm40 --- Barley --- Grain development --- Transcriptional dynamics --- RNA editing --- RNA-seq --- durum wheat --- Tunisian landraces --- center of diversity --- genetic diversity --- population structure --- DArTseq technology --- chromatin --- 3D-FISH --- nucleus --- introgression --- rye --- hybrid --- wheat --- genome stability --- wheat --- Thinopyrum --- chromosome --- ND-FISH --- oligo probe --- barley --- wheat --- protease --- germination --- grain --- abiotic stress --- antioxidant enzymes --- aquaporin --- TdPIP2 --- 1 --- histochemical analysis --- transgenic wheat --- transpiration --- wheat --- Aegilops tauschii --- Lr42 --- disease resistance --- molecular mapping --- KASP markers --- marker-assisted selection --- phytase --- wheat --- barley --- purple acid phosphatase phytase --- PAPhy --- mature grain phytase activity (MGPA) --- genome assembly --- bread wheat --- barley --- optical mapping --- BAC --- ribosomal DNA --- cereals --- CRISPR --- crops --- genetic engineering --- genome editing --- plant --- Triticeae --- n/a

DNA Replication Stress

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ISBN: 9783039213894 9783039213900 Year: Pages: 368 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-390-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 16:10:12
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This Special Issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS) is dedicated to the mechanisms mediated at the molecular and cellular levels in response to adverse genomic perturbations and DNA replication stress. The relevant proteins and processes play paramount roles in nucleic acid transactions to maintain genomic stability and cellular homeostasis. A total of 18 articles are presented which encompass a broad range of highly relevant topics in genome biology. These include replication fork dynamics, DNA repair processes, DNA damage signaling and cell cycle control, cancer biology, epigenetics, cellular senescence, neurodegeneration, and aging. As Guest Editor for this IJMS Special Issue, I am very pleased to offer this collection of riveting articles centered on the theme of DNA replication stress. The blend of articles builds upon a theme that DNA damage has profound consequences for genomic stability and cellular homeostasis that affect tissue function, disease, cancer, and aging at multiple levels and through unique mechanisms. I thank the authors for their excellent contributions, which provide new insight into this fascinating and highly relevant area of genome biology.

Keywords

barley --- chromosome --- DNA replication pattern --- EdU --- mutagens --- DNA replication --- DNA damage --- DNA repair --- genome integrity --- A549 cells --- H1299 cells --- heterogeneity --- DNA damage response --- 8-chloro-adenosine --- DNA replication --- S phase --- origin firing --- TopBP1 --- ATR --- DNA fiber assay --- APE2 --- ATR-Chk1 DDR pathway --- Genome integrity --- SSB end resection --- SSB repair --- SSB signaling --- DNA replication stress --- genome stability --- ubiquitin --- replication fork restart --- translesion synthesis --- template-switching --- homologous recombination --- Fanconi Anemia --- G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) --- aging --- DNA damage --- ?-arrestin --- G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) --- interactome --- G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2 (GIT2) --- ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) --- clock proteins --- energy metabolism --- neurodegeneration --- cellular senescence --- ageing --- Alzheimer’s disease --- multiple sclerosis --- Parkinson’s disease --- lipofuscin --- SenTraGorTM (GL13) --- senolytics --- DNA replication --- DNA repair --- DNA damage response --- DNA translocation --- DNA helicase --- superfamily 2 ATPase --- replication restart --- fork reversal --- fork regression --- chromatin remodeler --- C9orf72 --- ALS --- motor neuron disease --- R loops, nucleolar stress --- neurodegeneration --- Difficult-to-Replicate Sequences --- replication stress --- non-B DNA --- Polymerase eta --- Polymerase kappa --- genome instability --- common fragile sites --- Microsatellites --- cancer --- DNA double-strand repair --- premature aging --- post-translational modification --- protein stability --- replication stress --- Werner Syndrome --- Werner Syndrome Protein --- dormant origins --- replicative stress --- replication timing --- DNA damage --- genome instability --- cancer --- Thermococcus eurythermalis --- endonuclease IV --- AP site analogue --- spacer --- DNA repair --- DNA repair --- double strand break repair --- exonuclease 1 --- EXO1 --- mismatch repair --- MMR --- NER --- nucleotide excision repair --- strand displacements --- TLS --- translesion DNA synthesis --- POL? --- mutation frequency --- mutations spectra --- SupF --- mutagenicity --- oxidative stress --- DNA damage --- DNA repair --- replication --- 8-oxoG --- epigenetic --- gene expression --- helicase --- cell cycle checkpoints --- genomic instability --- G2-arrest --- cell death --- repair of DNA damage --- adaptation --- n/a

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