Search results: Found 5

Listing 1 - 5 of 5
Sort by
Recent Progress in Understanding the Mechanism and Consequences of Retrotransposon Movement

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783038425403 9783038425410 Year: Pages: VIII, 194 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-12-27 09:08:55
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Retrotransposons are present in essentially all eukaryotic genomes and come in two basic flavors: those that are bracketed by long terminal repeats (LTRs) and share a common ancestor with retroviruses, and non-LTR retrotransposons that have a distinct lineage and remain transpositionally active in humans. Both types of retrotransposons replicate through an RNA intermediate, stably integrate into the host genome and have accumulated to a very high copy number in mammals and certain plant species. Autonomous elements produce transcripts capable of undergoing reverse transcription, and minimally encode proteins with reverse transcriptase, integrase/endonucleolytic, and nucleic acid chaperone activities. Retrotransposons are currently distinguished from viruses, since the process of retrotransposition is not infectious. However, this boundary may prove to be provisional as we learn more about these mobile genetic elements. The goal of this Special Issue of Viruses is to highlight progress in understanding the mechanism and consequences of retrotransposon movement. Several active research areas may be covered in reviews and research articles, including the roles of cellular modulators and defense systems, retrotransposon expression and replication, retrotransposon-induced mutations and their association with human diseases, and how these widely disseminated elements mold eukaryotic genomes.

G-quadruplex and Microorganisms

Author:
ISBN: 9783039212439 9783039212446 Year: Pages: 208 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-244-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

G-quadruplexes (G4s) are nucleic acids secondary structures that form in DNA or RNA guanine (G)-rich strands. In recent years, the presence of G4s in microorganisms has attracted increasing interest. In prokaryotes, G4 sequences have been reported in several human pathogens. Bacterial enzymes able to process G4s have been identified. In viruses, G4s have been suggested to be involved in key steps of the viral life cycle: They have been associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), human papilloma virus, swine pseudorabies virus, and other viruses’ genomes. New evidence shows the presence of G4s in parasitic protozoa, such as the causative agent of malaria. G4 binding proteins and mRNA G4s have been implicated in the regulation of microorganisms’ genome replication and translation. G4 ligands have been developed and tested both as tools to study the complexity of G4-mediated mechanisms in the viral life cycle and as therapeutic agents. Moreover, new techniques to study G4 folding and their interactions with proteins have been developed. This Special Issue will focus on G4s present in microorganisms, addressing all the above aspects.

Repetitive DNA Sequences

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9783039283668 9783039283675 Year: Pages: 206 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-367-5 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:08
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Repetitive DNA is ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes, and, in many species, comprises the bulk of the genome. Repeats include transposable elements that can self-mobilize and disperse around the genome, and tandemly-repeated satellite DNAs that increase in copy number due to replication slippage and unequal crossing over. Despite their abundance, repetitive DNA is often ignored in genomic studies due to technical challenges in their identification, assembly, and quantification. New technologies and methods are now providing the unprecedented power to analyze repetitive DNAs across diverse taxa. Repetitive DNA is of particular interest because it can represent distinct modes of genome evolution. Some repetitive DNA forms essential genome structures, such as telomeres and centromeres, which are required for proper chromosome maintenance and segregation, whereas others form piRNA clusters that regulate transposable elements; thus, these elements are expected to evolve under purifying selection. In contrast, other repeats evolve selfishly and produce genetic conflicts with their host species that drive adaptive evolution of host defense systems. However, the majority of repeats likely accumulate in eukaryotes in the absence of selection due to mechanisms of transposition and unequal crossing over. Even these neutral repeats may indirectly influence genome evolution as they reach high abundance. In this Special Issue, the contributing authors explore these questions from a range of perspectives.

Evolution, Composition and Regulation of Supernumerary B Chromosomes

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9783038977865 9783038977872 Year: Pages: 254 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-787-2 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:28
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Supernumerary B chromosomes (Bs) are dispensable genetic elements found in thousands of species of plants and animals, and some fungi. Since their discovery more than a century ago, they have been a source of puzzlement, as they only occur in some members of a population and are absent from others. When they do occur, they are often harmful, and in the absence of “selfishness”, based on mechanisms of mitotic and meiotic drive, there appears to be no obvious reason for their existence. Cytogeneticists have long wrestled with questions about the biological existence of these enigmatic elements, including their lack of any adaptive properties, apparent absence of functional genes, their origin, sequence organization, and co-evolution as nuclear parasites. Emerging new technologies are now enabling researchers to step up a gear, to look enthusiastically beyond the previous limits of the horizon, and to uncover the secrets of these “silent” chromosomes. This book provides a comprehensive guide to theoretical advancements in the field of B chromosome research in both animal and plant systems.

Keywords

repetitive elements --- RNA-Seq --- genomics --- evolution --- cytogenetics --- supernumerary elements --- extra chromosomes --- B chromosomes --- transmission --- drive --- host/parasite interaction --- supernumerary chromosomes --- karyotype evolution --- genome instability --- supernumerary chromosomes --- heterochromatin --- parent-of-origin effects --- paternal X chromosome --- maternal X chromosome --- controlling element --- teleost --- population analysis --- whole genome resequencing --- DNA copy number variation --- ribosomal DNA --- B chromosomes --- FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridisation) --- GISH (genomic in situ hybridisation) --- Prospero autumnale complex --- supernumerary chromosomal segments (SCS) evolution --- tandem repeats --- Drosophila --- supernumerary --- satellite DNA --- sSMC --- B chromosomes --- dot-like (micro) Bs --- karyotypic characteristics --- ?s --- B morphotypes --- Apodemus peninsulae --- maize B chromosome --- centromere --- inactivation --- reactivation --- de novo centromere formation --- epigenetics --- supernumerary chromosomes --- additional chromosomes --- chromosome polymorphism --- evolution --- B chromosomes --- karyotypes --- genome evolution --- interphase nucleus --- mammals --- genes --- repetitive DNA --- transcription of heterochromatin --- B chromosomes --- grasshoppers --- DNA composition --- repeat clusters --- euchromatin degradation --- microdissected DNA probes --- B chromosome --- satellite DNA --- mobile element --- organelle DNA --- chromosome evolution --- fluorescent in situ hybridization --- Orthoptera --- satellite DNA --- supernumerary chromosome --- RepeatExplorer --- supernumerary chromosomes --- B chromosomes --- next-generation sequencing --- coverage ratio analysis --- n/a --- B chromosome --- transmission --- origin --- drive --- n/a

Virus Bioinformatics

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9783039218820 9783039218837 Year: Pages: 330 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-883-7 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:08
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Virus bioinformatics is evolving and succeeding as an area of research in its own right, representing the interface of virology and computer science. Bioinformatic approaches to investigate viral infections and outbreaks have become central to virology research, and have been successfully used to detect, control, and treat infections of humans and animals. As part of the Third Annual Meeting of the European Virus Bioinformatics Center (EVBC), we have published this Special Issue on Virus Bioinformatics.

Keywords

bioinformatics --- virus --- comparative genomics --- software --- Base-By-Base --- BBB --- poxvirus --- ASFV --- MSA --- foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) --- bovine soft palate --- nasopharynx --- transcriptomics --- proteomics --- bioinformatics --- virus-host interaction --- innate immune system --- interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) --- cellular immunity --- codon frequency distribution --- HPV58 --- minor capsid protein --- TLR agonist --- prophylaxis --- virus --- infection --- fluorescent reporter protein --- image quantification --- Hepatitis C virus --- Yellow Fever Virus --- polyomavirus --- Coxsackievirus B4 --- bivalve --- virome --- RNA-seq --- RNA viruses --- sncRNA --- ADAR --- RNAi --- Marek’s disease virus (MDV) --- RNA-seq --- transcriptome --- splicing --- polycistronic viral transcripts --- primary B cells --- RB1B --- CVI988/Rispens --- ICP0 --- DNA replication --- ori --- mitochondria --- Rickettsia --- gram-positive bacteria --- APMV --- Mimivirus --- giant virus --- eukaryogenesis --- flavivirus --- non-coding RNA --- secondary structure --- endogenous viral elements --- bioinformatics --- horizontal gene transfer --- virus-to-host gene transfer --- HMM --- tobacco mosaic virus --- Drosophila --- capsid protein --- deep sequencing --- virus genomics --- hepatitis C virus --- variant calling --- sequence interpretation --- drug resistance --- bioinformatics --- alignment --- assembly --- taxonomic classification --- time series --- data transformation --- DWT --- DFT --- PAA --- data compression --- compressive genomics --- RNAseq --- honey bees --- deformed wing virus --- quasispecies --- apiary pests --- recombination --- mRNA structure --- structure database --- secondary structure --- viral mRNA --- subVOG --- structurally related --- RNA structure --- structurally homogenous --- structurally related --- mRNA families --- Amebae viruses --- viral evolution --- protein domains --- mimivirus --- dsdna viruses --- translation machinery --- pandoravirus --- NCLDV --- virology --- virus bioinformatics --- software --- systems virology --- metagenomics --- virome --- viral taxonomy --- virus classification --- genome evolution --- bacteriophage --- virosphere --- chemical organization theory --- influenza A --- virus dynamics modeling --- complex networks analysis --- viral metagenome --- groundwater --- aquifer --- AquaDiva --- sequencing library preparation --- virus proteomics --- mass spectrometry --- virus diagnostics --- data analysis --- targeted proteomics --- peptide selection --- parallel reaction monitoring

Listing 1 - 5 of 5
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (5)


License

CC by-nc-nd (5)


Language

english (5)


Year
From To Submit

2020 (2)

2019 (2)

2017 (1)