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Obesity and Diabetes: Energy Regulation by Free Fatty Acid Receptors

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197477 Year: Pages: 45 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-747-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Internal medicine --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Food intake regulates energy balance and its dysregulation leads to metabolic disorder, such as obesity and diabetes. During feeding, free fatty acids (FFAs) are not only essential nutrients but also act as signaling molecules in various cellular processes. Recently, several orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that act as FFA receptors (FFARs) have been identified; GPR40/FFAR1, GPR119, and GPR120 are activated by medium- and long-chain FFAs. GPR84 is activated by medium-chain FFAs. GPR41/FFAR3 and GPR43/FFAR2 are activated by short-chain FFAs. These FFARs have come to be regarded as new drug targets for metabolic disorder such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, because a number of pharmacological and physiological studies have shown that these receptors are primarily involved in the energy metabolism in various tissues; insulin secretion, gastrointestinal hormone secretion, adipokine secretion, regulation of inflammation, regulation of autonomic nervous system, relation to gut microbiota, and so on. This Research Topic provides a comprehensive overview of the energy regulation by free fatty acid receptors and a new prospect for treatment of metabolic disorder such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Biomimetic Radical Chemistry and Applications

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ISBN: 9783039283927 9783039283934 Year: Pages: 300 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-393-4 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:09
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The enormous importance of free radical chemistry for a variety of biological events, including ageing and inflammation, has attracted a strong interest in understanding the related mechanistic steps at the molecular level. Modelling the free radical chemical reactivity of biological systems is an important research area. When studying free-radical-based chemical mechanisms, biomimetic chemistry and the design of established biomimetic models come into play to perform experiments in a controlled environment that is suitably designed to be in strict connection with cellular conditions. This Special Issue gives the reader a wide overview of biomimetic radical chemistry, where molecular mechanisms have been defined and molecular libraries of products are developed to also be used as traces for the discovery of some relevant biological processes. Several subjects are presented, with 12 articles and 6 reviews written by specialists in the fields of DNA, proteins, lipids, biotechnological applications, and bioinspired synthesis, having “free radicals” as a common denominator.

Keywords

type 2 diabetes --- glycogen phosphorylase --- anomeric spironucleosides --- 1,6-dioxa-4-azaspiro[4.5]decane --- [1,5]-radical translocation --- DNA --- guanine quadruplexes --- radicals --- electron holes --- oxidative damage --- photo-ionization --- time-resolved spectroscopy --- inhomogeneous reactions --- radiosensitizers --- stationary radiolysis --- pulse radiolysis --- modified nucleosides --- cellular response --- liposomal somatostatin --- retarded delivery --- free radicals --- isomerization --- trans lipid --- peroxidation --- photolysis --- laser flash photolysis --- ?-radiolysis --- singlet oxygen --- nucleosides --- free radicals --- reaction mechanism --- catalase activity --- iron(IV)-oxo --- hydrogen peroxide --- oxidation --- kinetic studies --- gold nanoparticles --- albumin --- EPR spectroscopy --- Raman spectroscopy --- circular dichroism --- beta cells --- diabetes --- confocal microscopy --- lipidomics --- membrane fluidity maps --- cell micropolarity maps --- DNA damage --- 5?,8-cyclopurines --- 8-oxo-dG --- free radicals --- pulse radiolysis --- gamma radiolysis --- Fenton reaction --- oligonucleotides --- oxidative DNA damage --- DNA replication stress --- replication fork stalling --- genomic and epigenomic instability --- DNA methylation --- histone modifications --- miRNAs --- iron porphyrin --- heme --- ATRPase --- iron-mediated ATRP --- bio-mimicking catalyst --- biomimetic radical reaction --- bioinspired chemical catalysis --- protein labeling --- DNA oxidation --- DNA hole transfer --- DNA --- quantum dynamics --- electron transfer --- charge transfer --- radical reaction --- azidoalkylation --- carboazidation --- sulfones --- azides --- Julia–Kocienski olefination --- DNA damage --- copper --- chemical nuclease --- intercalation --- free radical oxidation --- protein stability --- therapeutic proteins --- thiyl radicals --- oxidation --- fragmentation --- cross-link --- 2-thiouracil --- radiosensitizers --- ?OH and ?N3 radicals --- 2c-3e S?S-bonded intermediates --- pulse radiolysis --- TD-DFT methods --- thiobases --- nucleobase derivatives --- reactive aldehydes --- hydroxynonenal --- oxononenal --- free fatty acids --- mitochondrial uncoupling protein --- lipid bilayer membranes

Adipokines 2.0

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ISBN: 9783039285860 / 9783039285877 Year: Pages: 406 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-587-7 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Therapeutics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Once viewed solely as fat storage cells, adipocytes and their adipokines have now been proven to be central for human health. Understanding that overweight and obesity may increase the risk for various diseases requires detailed characterization of adipokine function. Weight gain, weight regain, and fasting affect adipocyte health and accordingly their secretome. Different adipose tissue deposits exist and they vary in cellular composition and function. The evidence is strong of a role of adipokines in cancer, reproductive function, neurological diseases, cardiovascular diseases ,and rheumatoid arthritis. Adipokines are considered useful biomarkers for adipose tissue and metabolic health, and may be used as diagnostic tools in rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, or sepsis. This book contains 10 original articles and 9 review articles focusing on these bioactive peptides. Several articles deal with chemerin, an adipokine discovered more than 20 years ago. Data so far have resulted in promising insights related to its biological function. We are only beginning to understand the multiple roles of chemerin, the mechanisms regulating its activity, and the signaling pathways used by this chemokine. Adipokine receptor agonists and antagonists may result in the formulation of novel drugs and ultimately may lead to new therapeutic targets to be used in clinical practice.

Keywords

adipokines --- secreted frizzled-related protein 5 --- leptin --- ghrelin --- excessive gestational weight gain --- neonatal anthropometry --- obesity --- proteolysis --- Tango bioassay --- biologic activity --- chemerin receptors --- excessive gestational weight gain --- neonatal anthropometry --- leptin --- ghrelin --- Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease --- fatty liver --- free fatty acids --- label-free proteomic profiling --- adipokine --- obesity --- visceral fat --- sick fat --- annexins --- adipose tissue --- adiponectin --- cholesterol --- glucose homeostasis --- inflammation --- insulin --- lipid metabolism --- obesity --- triglycerides --- adipokine --- chemerin --- leukocyte --- cancer --- adipokines --- PCOS --- polycystic ovary morphology --- follicular fluid --- human granulosa cells --- chemerin --- chemerin receptors --- hypothalamus --- oestrous cycle --- early pregnancy --- pig --- alpha-fetoprotein --- liver steatosis --- hypertension --- adipokines --- SGBS adipocytes --- glucose restriction --- in vitro fat regain --- weight regain --- complement factors --- cathepsins --- extracellular remodeling --- adipokine --- rheumatic diseases --- inflammation --- osteoarthritis --- rheumatoid arthritis --- ovary --- testis --- adipose tissue --- polycystic ovary syndrome --- preeclempsia --- gestational diabetes --- testicular pathologies --- rheumatoid arthritis --- tocilizumab --- lipids --- adipokines --- adiponectin --- resistin --- leptin --- cancer --- obesity --- adipokine --- chemerin --- chemokine-like receptor 1 --- G protein-coupled receptor 1 --- C-C chemokine receptor-like 2 --- critical illness --- sepsis --- adipokines --- biomarker --- prognosis --- ICU --- adipokine --- adipose-brain axis --- brain health --- neurodegeneration --- depression --- energy metabolism --- inflammation --- hypothalamus --- microglia --- adiponectin --- adipokine --- myokine --- fitness --- metabolically healthy obese --- early-life programming --- epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) --- prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) --- EP3 receptor --- EP4 receptor --- exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 2 (EPAC2) --- stimulating growth factor 2 (ST2) --- interleukin(IL)-33 --- Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) --- fat mass --- n/a

Biomass Processing for Biofuels, Bioenergy and Chemicals

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783039289097 / 9783039289103 Year: Pages: 428 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-910-3 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Biomass can be used to produce renewable electricity, thermal energy, transportation fuels (biofuels), and high-value functional chemicals. As an energy source, biomass can be used either directly via combustion to produce heat or indirectly after it is converted to one of many forms of bioenergy and biofuel via thermochemical or biochemical pathways. The conversion of biomass can be achieved using various advanced methods, which are broadly classified into thermochemical conversion, biochemical conversion, electrochemical conversion, and so on. Advanced development technologies and processes are able to convert biomass into alternative energy sources in solid (e.g., charcoal, biochar, and RDF), liquid (biodiesel, algae biofuel, bioethanol, and pyrolysis and liquefaction bio-oils), and gaseous (e.g., biogas, syngas, and biohydrogen) forms. Because of the merits of biomass energy for environmental sustainability, biofuel and bioenergy technologies play a crucial role in renewable energy development and the replacement of chemicals by highly functional biomass. This book provides a comprehensive overview and in-depth technical research addressing recent progress in biomass conversion processes. It also covers studies on advanced techniques and methods for bioenergy and biofuel production.

Keywords

lignocellulose --- pretreatment --- hardwood --- extrusion --- enzymatic digestibility --- bioethanol --- renewable energy --- biofuel --- environment --- technology development --- co-combustion --- sewage sludge --- thermogravimetric analysis --- Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy --- synergistic effect --- single-pellet combustion --- biodiesel --- fatty acid methyl ester --- free fatty acids --- oxidation stability --- antioxidant --- hydrogen --- coffee mucilage --- organic wastes --- dark fermentation --- anaerobic digestion --- biodiesel --- bio-jet fuel --- triacylglycerides --- Fatty Acid Methyl Ester --- lipids --- hydrodeoxygenation --- drop-in fuel --- rubber seed oil --- biodiesel production --- nanomagnetic catalyst --- subcritical methanol --- FAME yield --- Box-Behnken design --- GCI --- biodiesel --- diesel --- combustion --- emission --- renewable energy --- microwave --- free fatty acid --- crude oil --- renewable energy --- biomass --- waste --- black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) --- instar --- lipid --- fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) --- fermentation --- Rancimat method --- butylated hydroxyanisole --- tert-butylhydroquinone --- fatty acid methyl esters --- viscosity --- response surface --- anaerobic treatment --- biogas --- kinetic study --- potato peels --- cow manure --- thermophilic --- mesophilic --- palm oil mill effluent --- acclimatization --- direct carbon fuel cell --- biochar --- pyrolysis --- power density --- pre-treatment --- post-treatment --- combustion characteristics --- injection strategies --- compression ratio --- intake temperature --- torrefaction --- vacuum --- biomass pretreatment --- bioenergy --- energy yield --- biochar --- rice straw --- rice husk --- power generation --- gasification --- alternative fuel --- Rhus typhina biodiesel --- non-edible oil --- base-catalyzed transesterification --- Physico-chemical properties --- concentration polarization --- draw solution --- feed solution --- forward osmosis --- pressure-retarded osmosis --- operating conditions --- membrane fouling --- osmotic membrane --- bioenergy --- biofuel --- nanotechnology --- nano-catalysts --- nano-additives --- crude glycerol --- glycerol carbonate --- dimethyl carbonate --- microwave irradiation --- reaction kinetics

Dietary Intake and Type 2 Diabetes

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ISBN: 9783039217045 9783039217052 Year: Pages: 322 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-705-2 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Nutrition and Food Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-07 09:08:26
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Abstract

The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and worldwide, partly due to changes in lifestyle which predispose individuals to overweight and obesity. It is estimated that about 90% of the currently diagnosed adults have type 2 diabetes, and based on the World Health Organisation (WHO) report, about 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014 compared with 108 million in 1980; this condition caused about 1.5 million deaths in 2012. In the United States of America, it is estimated that about 30.3 million adults are living with diabetes, with a further 1.5 million new diabetes cases diagnosed every year, representing an increasing prevalence of this condition. Diabetes represents a major public health challenge, despite advances in technology and the pharmaceutical industry. These problems may be in the form of acute or long-term complications. Therefore, in order to attenuate the problems of diabetes, management strategies usually include lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity and dietary interventions. Studies which evaluate the role of nutrition in the management of type 2 diabetes often involve human and animal models as these approaches enable us to have a broader and more in-depth understanding of the condition. In some cases, diabetes may co-exist with other conditions, such as stroke, and these may present unique challenges with regard to nutritional interventions. This Special Issue aims to evaluate the risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes and the role of the diet in the management of people with this condition. This evidence is drawn from both human and animal studies.

Keywords

aronia --- ginseng --- mushroom --- pancreatectomy --- type 2 diabetes --- gut microbiome --- insulin secretion --- energy restricted diet --- low energy diet --- carbohydrate restricted diet --- low carbohydrate diet --- diabetes --- Japanese --- tempeh --- lactic acid bacteria --- short chain fatty acids --- metabolic syndrome --- high fat diet --- feces --- type 2 diabetes mellitus --- peanut --- almond --- glycemic control --- body mass index --- lipids --- interleukin-6 --- muscle --- insulin resistance --- free fatty acids (FFA) --- diabetes --- rosemary extract --- AMPK --- prediabetes --- type 2 diabetes --- total body fat --- total body lean --- appendicular fat --- appendicular lean --- body composition --- cohort study --- micronutrients --- trace elements --- food --- glycated hemoglobin A --- hyperglycemia --- dietary pattern --- triglyceride --- high-density lipoprotein cholesterol --- type 2 diabetes --- type 2 diabetes mellitus --- nutrition --- DASH --- diet quality --- diabetes management --- dietary intake --- longitudinal analysis --- lifestyle management --- carbohydrate counting --- protein and fat counting --- insulin dosage --- glucose monitoring --- diabetes mellitus --- type 1 diabetes --- type 2 diabetes --- Hedychium coronarium --- type 2 diabetes --- aldosterone --- streptozotocin --- metabolic syndrome --- folk medicine --- calcium intake --- dairy products --- vitamin D --- type 2 diabetes --- diabetes --- diabetes reversal --- bariatric surgery --- very-low-calorie --- low-carbohydrate --- zinc intake --- zinc status --- trace elements --- type 2 diabetes mellitus --- systematic review --- meta-analysis --- epidemiology --- PUFA --- polyunsaturated fatty acids --- glycemic control --- nuts --- fish --- fish oil --- vegetable oil --- type 2 diabetes --- vitamin D deficiency --- 25-OH-D --- women --- cardiovascular risk factors --- T2DM --- obesity --- glycaemic index --- incretins --- subjective appetite --- isomaltulose --- sucromalt --- nutritional supplement --- type 2 diabetes --- gestational diabetes --- glycemic index --- randomised controlled trial --- lipid profile --- inflammatory parameters --- diabetes specific formula --- standard formula --- type 2 diabetes --- enteral nutrition --- enteral tube feeding --- lipids --- fasting blood glucose --- glycated haemoglobin --- type 2 diabetes --- dietary intake --- glycaemic control --- dietary management approaches --- micronutrients --- macronutrients --- nutrition --- chronic conditions --- lipid parameters

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