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Protein Solubility and Aggregation in Bacteria

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199761 Year: Pages: 127 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-976-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Abstract

Proteins suffer many conformational changes and interactions through their life, from their synthesis at ribosomes to their controlled degradation. Only folded and soluble proteins are functional. Thus, protein folding and solubility are controlled genetically, transcriptionally, and at the protein sequence level. In addition, a well-conserved cellular machinery assists the folding of polypeptides to avoid misfolding and ensure the attainment of soluble and functional structures. When these redundant protective strategies are overcome, misfolded proteins are recruited into aggregates. Recombinant protein production is an essential tool for the biotechnology industry and also supports expanding areas of basic and biomedical research, including structural genomics and proteomics. Although bacteria still represent a convenient production system, many recombinant polypeptides produced in prokaryotic hosts undergo irregular or incomplete folding processes that usually result in their accumulation as insoluble aggregates, narrowing thus the spectrum of protein-based drugs that are available in the biotechnology market. In fact, the solubility of bacterially produced proteins is of major concern in production processes, and many orthogonal strategies have been exploited to try to increase soluble protein yields. Importantly, contrary to the usual assumption that the bacterial aggregates formed during protein production are totally inactive, the presence of a fraction of molecules in a native-like structure in these assemblies endorse them with a certain degree of biological activity, a property that is allowing the use of bacteria as factories to produce new functional materials and catalysts. The protein embedded in intracellular bacterial deposits might display different conformations, but they are usually enriched in beta-sheet-rich assemblies resembling the amyloid fibrils characteristic of several human neurodegenerative diseases. This makes bacterial cells simple, but biologically relevant model systems to address the mechanisms behind amyloid formation and the cellular impact of protein aggregates. Interestingly, bacteria also exploit the structural principles behind amyloid formation for functional purposes such as adhesion or cytotoxicity. In the present research topic we collect papers addressing all the issues mentioned above from both the experimental and computational point of view.

G-quadruplex and Microorganisms

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ISBN: 9783039212439 9783039212446 Year: Pages: 208 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-244-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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G-quadruplexes (G4s) are nucleic acids secondary structures that form in DNA or RNA guanine (G)-rich strands. In recent years, the presence of G4s in microorganisms has attracted increasing interest. In prokaryotes, G4 sequences have been reported in several human pathogens. Bacterial enzymes able to process G4s have been identified. In viruses, G4s have been suggested to be involved in key steps of the viral life cycle: They have been associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), human papilloma virus, swine pseudorabies virus, and other viruses’ genomes. New evidence shows the presence of G4s in parasitic protozoa, such as the causative agent of malaria. G4 binding proteins and mRNA G4s have been implicated in the regulation of microorganisms’ genome replication and translation. G4 ligands have been developed and tested both as tools to study the complexity of G4-mediated mechanisms in the viral life cycle and as therapeutic agents. Moreover, new techniques to study G4 folding and their interactions with proteins have been developed. This Special Issue will focus on G4s present in microorganisms, addressing all the above aspects.

Nucleic Acid Architectures for Therapeutics, Diagnostics, Devices and Materials

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ISBN: 9783039212590 9783039212606 Year: Pages: 186 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-260-6 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) and their chemical analogs have been utilized as building materials due to their biocompatibility and programmability. RNA, which naturally possesses a wide range of different functions, is now being widely investigated for its role as a responsive biomaterial which dynamically reacts to changes in the surrounding environment. It is now evident that artificially designed self-assembling RNAs, that can form programmable nanoparticles and supra-assemblies, will play an increasingly important part in a diverse range of applications, such as macromolecular therapies, drug delivery systems, biosensing, tissue engineering, programmable scaffolds for material organization, logic gates, and soft actuators, to name but a few. The current exciting Special Issue comprises research highlights, short communications, research articles, and reviews that all bring together the leading scientists who are exploring a wide range of the fundamental properties of RNA and DNA nanoassemblies suitable for biomedical applications.

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