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Allegorische Andachtsbücher in Antwerpen - Jan Davids Texte und Theodoor Galles Illustrationen in den jesuitischen Buchprojekten der Plantiniana

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ISBN: 9783863952341 Year: DOI: 10.17875/gup2015-841 Language: German
Publisher: Universitätsverlag Göttingen
Subject: Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2016-06-21 11:02:16
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Die bei Plantin-Moretus um 1600 in Antwerpen gedruckten, von Jan David SJ verfassten und durch Theodoor Galle aufwendig illustrierten Andachtsbücher werden erstmals vollständig und systematisch, unter Berücksichtigung der Texte und zugehöriger Bilder, vorgestellt und untersucht. Deren komplexe Kupfersticherfi ndungen sind nicht - wie bislang angenommen - Emblemvarianten, sondern stellen ein gänzlich anders funktionierendes System der Text- und Bild-Synthese dar. Der jeweiligen Andachts-, Erbauungs- oder Lehrfunktion entsprechend verbildlichen die Kupferstiche Allegorisierungen moralischer und religiöser Didaxe, bildinterne Lettern und beigefügte Erläuterungen erschließen Inhalte und stellen den Bezug zu den verbildlichten Texten her. Analyse der unterschiedlichen Text-Bild-Verschränkungen in den vier Büchern, Herleitung der Buchstabenverweissysteme, buchgeschichtliche Einordnung, Entstehungsumstände, Konzeptionsgeschichte, funktionale Bestimmungen und Rezeptionen der Bücher und Bilder werden umfassend geklärt. Neben Veridicus Christianus (1601), Occasio Arrepta Neglecta (1605), Paradisus Sponsi et Sponsae (1607) und Duodecim Specula (1610) wurde auch das umfangreiche und viel rezipierte, von Boetius a Bolswert illustrierte Via Vitae Aeternae (1620) des Antoine Sucquet SJ ausführlich behandelt.

Piety in Pieces

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ISBN: 9781783742356 Year: Pages: 412 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0094 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-22 11:01:37
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"Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence. Made by highly specialised craftspeople (scribes, illuminators, book binders) with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials (parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants), books were expensive and built to last. They usually outlived their owners. Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts. These activities accelerated in the fifteenth century. Most manuscripts made before 1390 were bespoke and made for a particular client, but those made after 1390 (especially books of hours) were increasingly made for an open market, in which the producer was not in direct contact with the buyer. Increased efficiency led to more generic products, which owners were motivated to personalise. It also led to more blank parchment in the book, for example, the backs of inserted miniatures and the blanks ends of textual components. Book buyers of the late fourteenth and throughout the fifteenth century still held onto the old connotations of manuscripts—that they were custom-made luxury items—even when the production had become impersonal. Owners consequently purchased books made for an open market and then personalised them, filling in the blank spaces, and even adding more components later. This would give them an affordable product, but one that still smacked of luxury and met their individual needs. They kept older books in circulation by amending them, attached items to generic books to make them more relevant and valuable, and added new prayers with escalating indulgences as the culture of salvation shifted. Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire. Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation? "

Piety in Pieces : How Medieval Readers Customized their Manuscripts

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ISBN: 9782821883970 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-06 13:15:39
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Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence. Made by highly specialised craftspeople (scribes, illuminators, book binders) with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials (parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants), books were expensive and built to last. They usually outlived their owners. Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts. These activities accelerated in the fifteenth century. Most manuscripts made before 1390 were bespoke and made for a particular client, but those made after 1390 (especially books of hours) were increasingly made for an open market, in which the producer was not in direct contact with the buyer. Increased efficiency led to more generic products, which owners were motivated to personalise. It also led to more blank parchment in the book, for example, the backs of inserted miniatures and the blanks ends of textual components. Book buyers of the late fourteenth and throughout the fifteenth century still held onto the old connotations of manuscripts-that they were custom-made luxury items-even when the production had become impersonal. Owners consequently purchased books made for an open market and then personalised them, filling in the blank spaces, and even adding more components later. This would give them an affordable product, but one that still smacked of luxury and met their individual needs. They kept older books in circulation by amending them, attached items to generic books to make them more relevant and valuable, and added new prayers with escalating indulgences as the culture of salvation shifted. Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire. Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation?

Domestic Devotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

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ISBN: 9783039289134 / 9783039289141 Year: Pages: 448 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-914-1 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Domestic devotion has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years, with the publication of a number of significant studies on the early modern period in particular. This Special Issue aims to build on these works and to expand their range, both geographically and chronologically. This collection focuses on lived religion and the devotional practices found in the domestic settings of late medieval and early modern Europe. More particularly, it investigates the degree to which the experience of personal or familial religious practice in the domestic realm intersected with the more public expression of faith in liturgical or communal settings. Its broad geographical range (spanning northern, southern, central and eastern Europe) includes practices related to Christianity, Judaism and Islam. This Special Issue will be of interest to historians, art historians, medievalists, early modernists, historians of religion, anthropologists and theologians, as well as those interested in the history of material religious culture. It also offers important insights into research areas such as gender studies, histories of the emotions and histories of the senses.

Musikalische Repertoires in Zentraleuropa (1420-1450)

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ISBN: 9783205795629 Year: Pages: 422 DOI: 10.26530/oapen_512255 Language: English
Publisher: Böhlau Grant: Austrian Science Fund - PUB 160
Subject: Music
Added to DOAB on : 2014-12-04 09:02:39
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With famous music manuscripts such as the St Emmeram codex or the Trent codices and the rise of a musical elite with singer-composers around Dufay and Binchois, the years around 1430 belong to a crucial period in late-medieval music history. The present volume comprises 13 case studies on polyphonic as well as monophonic repertories with a particular focus on the city of Vienna. For the first time, the ‘simultaneity’ of ‘non-simultaneous’ phenomena is scrutinized for Central Europe and for the cultural exchange with neighbouring territories of the Holy Roman Empire, of England, Bohemia and Northern Italy.Due to its specific urban profile and the geographical position, late-medieval Vienna offers an excellent starting point for the study of musical repertories in Central Europe and their appropriation as cultural practice in the first half of the fifteenth century. The ‘simultaneity’ of ‘non-simultaneous’ phenomena is closely connected to the coexistence of different patterns of music patronage within court and nobility, the university, a variety of ecclesiastical institutions (among them the collegiate church of All Saints, later St Stephen’s Cathedral), and diverse strands of upper- and middle-class citizens on the one hand, cultural exchange with neighbouring territories of the Holy Roman Empire, of England, Bohemia and Northern Italy on the other. Manifold strands of polyphonic and monophonic repertories (both sacred and profane), compositional techniques, regionally bound stylistic peculiarities, strategems of music patronage, institutional (or even personal) collectionism, furthermore aspects of music iconography and the role of music within the history of ideas are scrutinized in thirteen chapters, which are conceived as case-studies, plus a detailed thematical introduction. In sum, this is an invaluable contribution to a better understanding of a crucial period of late-medieval music history.

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