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Brain Reward & Stress Systems in Addiction

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194575 Year: Pages: 184 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-457-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychiatry --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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Addiction to drugs and alcohol is a dynamic and multi-faceted disease process in humans, with devastating health and financial consequences for the individual and society-at-large. In humans, drug and alcohol use disorders (i.e., abuse and dependence) are defined by clusters of behavioral symptoms that can be modeled to various degrees in animals. Hallmark behavioral symptoms associated with drug and alcohol dependence are compulsive drug use, loss of control during episodes of drug use, the emergence of a negative emotional state in the absence of the drug, and chronic relapse vulnerability during drug abstinence. The transition to drug dependence is defined by neuroadaptations in brain circuits that, in the absence of drugs, mediate a variety of critical behavioral and physiological processes including natural reward, positive and negative emotional states, nociception, and feeding. Chronic drug exposure during the transition to dependence spurs (1) within-systems changes in neural circuits that contribute to the acute rewarding effects of the drug and (2) recruitment of brain stress systems (neuroendocrine and extra-hypothalamic). There are substantial genetic contributions to the propensity to use and abuse drugs, and drug abuse is highly co-morbid with various other psychiatric conditions (e.g., anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder) that may precede or follow the development of drug use problems. Across drugs of abuse, there are overlapping and dissociable aspects of the behavioral and neural changes that define the transition to dependence. Even within a single drug, people abuse drugs for a variety of reasons. The picture is further complicated by the fact that humans often abuse more than one drug concurrently. Even in the face of these challenges, pre-clinical and clinical research is making exponential gains into understanding the neurobiology of drug addiction. With the advent of new technologies and their combination with traditional approaches, the field is able to ask and answer addiction-related research questions in increasingly sophisticated ways. Here, we hope to assemble a collection of articles that provide an up-to-the-moment snapshot of the prevailing empirical, theoretical and technical directions in the addiction research field. We encourage submissions from all investigators working to understand the neurobiology of addiction, especially as it pertains to reward and stress pathways in the brain.

Keywords

relapse --- reward --- stress --- pain --- alcohol --- Nicotine --- Heroin --- Methamphetamine

Teaching ‘Proper’ Drinking?

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ISBN: 9781760461577 Year: DOI: 10.22459/CAEPR39.12.2017 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Business and Management --- Ethnology --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-16 11:01:43
License: ANU Press

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"In Teaching ‘Proper’ Drinking?, the author brings together three fields of scholarship: socio-historical studies of alcohol, Australian Indigenous policy history and social enterprise studies. The case studies in the book offer the first detailed surveys of efforts to teach responsible drinking practices to Aboriginal people by installing canteens in remote communities, and of the purchase of public hotels by Indigenous groups in attempts both to control sales of alcohol and to create social enterprises by redistributing profits for the community good. Ethnographies of the hotels are examined through the analytical lens of the Swedish ‘Gothenburg’ system of municipal hotel ownership. The research reveals that the community governance of such social enterprises is not purely a matter of good administration or compliance with the relevant liquor legislation. Their administration is imbued with the additional challenges posed by political contestation, both within and beyond the communities concerned. ‘The idea that community or government ownership and management of a hotel or other drinking place would be a good way to control drinking and limit harm has been commonplace in many Anglophone and Nordic countries, but has been less recognised in Australia. Maggie Brady’s book brings together the hidden history of such ideas and initiatives in Australia … In an original and wide-ranging set of case studies, Brady shows that success in reducing harm has varied between communities, largely depending on whether motivations to raise revenue or to reduce harm are in control.’ — Professor Robin Room, Director, Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, La Trobe University"

Memory Systems of the Addicted Brain: The Underestimated Role of Drug-Induced Cognitive Biases in Addiction and Its Treatment

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454877 Year: Pages: 163 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-487-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Psychiatry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Drug addiction may be viewed as a form of learning during which strong associations linking actions to drug-seeking are expressed as persistent stimulus–response habits, thereby maintaining a vulnerability to relapse. Disrupting cue–drug memory could be an efficient strategy to reduce the strength of cues in motivating drug-taking behavior. Upon reactivation, these memories undergo a reconsolidation process that can be blocked pharmacologically, providing an opportunity to prevent the powerful control of drug cues on behavior. This conceptually elegant approach still calls for more experimental data. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that drug taking not only accelerates habit forming, but has long-lasting effects on interactions between memory systems eventually leading to a functional imbalance. The dorsal part of the striatum plays a critical role in habit/procedural learning, whereas the hippocampal memory system encodes relationships between events and their later flexible use. Both humans and rodents studies support the view that the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum interact in either a cooperative or competitive manner during learning, the prefrontal cortex being involved in the selection of an appropriate learning strategy. Chronic drug consumption biases normal interactions between these memory systems. For instance, drug-experienced rodents tend to use preferentially striatum-dependent learning strategies in navigational tasks. These persistent effects seem to occur at cellular, neurophysiological and behavioral levels to promote specific, striatal-dependent forms of learning, to the detriment of spatial/declarative, hippocampal-dependent and more flexible types of memory. Whether cue sensitive and response learners, in contrast to spatial learners, could be prone to drug addiction is an intriguing hypothesis which clearly deserves to be further explored. A loss of flexibility may be uncovered also by imposing changing rules on the subject, such as requiring an attentional shift between different perceptual features of a complex stimulus, as in the attentional set shifting task which was recently adapted to rodents. Working memory is at risk during transition phases, although it remains to be determined whether withdrawal-induced alterations are observed also during protracted abstinence. Drug-induced cognitive biases thus lead to cognitive rigidity which could play a critical, yet overlooked role in different phases of addiction (acquisition, extinction/withdrawal and relapse). They are also likely to preclude the clinical efficiency of treatments. Therefore, the aim of this research topic is to provide an overview of the current work investigating the long-term impact of drug use on learning and memory processes, how multiple memory systems modulate drug-seeking behavior, as well as how drug-induced cognitive biases could contribute to the persistence of addictive behaviors.

Pathways to Recovery and Desistance

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ISBN: 9781447349310 Year: Pages: 232 Language: English
Publisher: Policy Press
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-09-11 11:21:03
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Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. Putting forward a new recovery roadmap and new reform models for prisoners reintegration, Best provides an accessible guide for the implementation of community partnerships for people in recovery from substance abuse or rehabilitating from offending. Using case studies and a strengths-based approach the book emphasizes the importance of long-term recovery and the role that communities and peers play in the process.

Catalysis for Low Temperature Fuel Cells

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ISBN: 9783038426585 9783038426592 Year: Pages: 210 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-659-2 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Chemistry (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-24 13:49:23
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Today, the development of active and stable catalysts still represents a challenge to overcome in the research field of low temperature fuel cells. Operation at low temperatures demands the utilization of highly active catalysts to reduce the activation energy of the electrochemical reactions involved at the electrodes, and thus obtain practical performances and high efficiencies. At present, the most practical catalysts in low temperature fuel cells are highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles. However, these present several drawbacks such as high cost, limited earth resources, sensitivity to contaminants, low tolerance to the presence of alcohols and stability due to carbon support corrosion and Pt dissolution. In the search for alternative catalysts, researchers have looked at several strategies: increase of the utilization of Pt catalysts by means of novel structures (metal/support), alloying with non-platinum metals, new carbon and non-carbon supports, cheaper platinum-group-metals like Pd, non-platinum-group metals catalysts (Fe-N-C, Co-N-C, etc.), etc. This book is intended to cover the most recent progresses in advanced electro-catalysts from the synthesis and characterization to the evaluation of performance and degradation mechanisms, in order to gain insights towards the development of highly active fuel cells.

Brief Interventions for Risky Drinkers

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198870 Year: Pages: 83 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-887-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Psychiatry
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Alcohol is the sixth leading risk factor for disability and premature death all over the world, and one of the leading causes of premature mortality in western societies; it is a leading risk factor for death in young and middle-age males. Heavy drinking accounts for about two thirds of the burden of disease attributable to alcohol. In the early 1980s, screening and brief interventions (SBI) in primary health care settings were proposed as effective strategies to identify risky drinkers and to help them reduce their drinking. Since then, a growing body of evidence, including several meta-analysis and Cochrane reviews, has shown the efficacy and effectiveness of SBI in primary health settings. However, demonstrating the effectiveness of SBI has not been insufficient to facilitate its general implementation in the routines of primary health care physicians, and in fact the dissemination of SBI has proven to be a difficult business. Qualitative and quantitative research has identified most of the facilitators and barriers for its implementation, and publicly funded research has been earmarked to address the dissemination problems worldwide. Some examples are the World Health Organization Phase III and Phase IV studies on the identification and management of alcohol-related problems in primary care, EU funded projects (PHEPA, AMPHORA, ODHIN, BISTAIRS), the UK SIPS trials and the SBIRT developments sponsored by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in the USA. The efficacy and effectiveness of SBI in primary health is now well established, but there are still some questions that remain unsolved: which practitioners should deliver them; what length should they be; is there a need for booster sessions; is there added value of a motivational approach? These questions, together with other relevant aspects of SBI, need ongoing research. In recent years, SBIs have been tested in settings other than primary health care, including hospitals, accident and emergency rooms, criminal justice, colleges and universities, social services and pharmacies. In some of those areas, the evidence is scarce (for example, pharmacies) while in others it is very promising (for example, students and hospitals). New technologies have also offered the possibility of online tools, and, in the last few years, different digital-based applications have been tested successfully as new ways to deliver effective SBIs to larger amounts of people. Brief interventions have also spread to drugs other than alcohol. This book aims to be an update of the state-of-the art of brief advice. It is a compilation of articles published by some of the most relevant researchers in the field in Frontiers in Psychiatry between 2014 and 2016.

Experimental models of early exposure to alcohol: a way to unravel the neurobiology of mental retardation

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194728 Year: Pages: 104 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-472-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Pediatrics --- Psychiatry --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:33
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Excessive alcohol drinking represents a major social and public health problem for several countries. Alcohol abuse during pregnancy leads to a complex syndrome referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), chiefly characterized by mental retardation. The effects of early exposure to ethanol can be reproduced in laboratory animals and this helped to answer several key questions concerning the human pathology. The interest of experimental models of FASD is twofold. First, they increase our knowledge about the dose and modality of alcohol consumption able to induce damaging effects on the developing brain. Second, experimental models of FASD can provide useful hints to elucidate the basic mechanisms leading to the intellectual disability. In fact, experimental exposure to alcohol can be carried out during discrete, often very restricted, time windows. As a consequence, FASD models, though depending on the multifaceted interference of alcohol with several molecular pathways, can provide valuable information about which specific developmental periods and brain areas are critically involved in the genesis of mental retardation. Putting together data obtained through several experimental paradigms of alcohol exposure and those deriving from other genetic and non-genetic models, one can figure out to what extent different types of mental retardation share common pathogenetic mechanisms. The present Research Topic is aimed at establishing the state of the art of the current research on experimental FASD, focusing on differences and homologies with other types of intellectual disability. The ultimate goal is to find out a common roadmap in view of future therapeutical approaches.

Long-Term Consequences of Adolescent Drug Use: Evidence from Pre-Clinical and Clinical Models

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455300 Year: Pages: 201 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-530-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychiatry --- Medicine (General) --- Therapeutics --- Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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The purpose of this collection is to provide a forum to integrate pre-clinical and clinical investigations regarding the long-term consequences of adolescent exposure to drugs of abuse. Adolescence is characterized by numerous behavioral and biological changes, including substantial neurodevelopment. Behaviorally, adolescents are more likely to engage in risky activities and make impulsive decisions. As such, the majority of substance use begins in adolescence, and an earlier age of onset of use (<15 yr) is strongly associated with the risk for developing a substance use disorder later in life. Furthermore, adolescent drug use may negatively impact ongoing neurological development, which could lead to long-term cognitive and emotional deficits. A large number of clinical studies have investigated both the acute and long-term effects of adolescent drug use on functional outcomes. However, the clinical literature contains many conflicting findings, and is often hampered by the inability to know if functional differences existed prior to drug use. Moreover, in human populations it is often very difficult to control for the numerous types of drugs, doses, and combinations used, not to mention the many other environmental factors that may influence adult behavior. Therefore, an increase in the number of carefully controlled studies using relevant animal models has the potential to clarify which adolescent experiences, particularly what drugs used when, have long-term negative consequences. Despite the advantages of animal model systems in clarifying these issues, the majority of pre-clinical addiction research over the past 50+ years has been conducted in adult animals. Moreover, few addiction-related studies have investigated the long-term neurocognitive consequences of drug exposure at any age. In the past 10 years of so, however, the field of adolescent drug abuse research has burgeoned. To date, the majority of this research has focused on adolescent alcohol exposure using a variety of animal models. The results have given the field important insight into why adolescents are more likely to drink alcohol to excess relative to adults, and the danger of adolescent alcohol use (e.g., in leading to a persistence of excessive drinking in adulthood). More recently, research regarding the effects of adolescent exposure to other drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine, and cannabinoids has expanded. Therefore, we are at unique point in time, when emerging results from carefully controlled pre-clinical studies can inform the sometimes confusing clinical literature. In addition, we expect an influx of prospective clinical studies in response to a cross-institute initiative at NIH, known as the ABCD grant. Several institutes are enrolling children prior to adolescence (and the initiation of drug use), in order to control for pre-existing neurobiological and neurobehavioral differences and to monitor the age of initiation and amount of drug used more carefully than is possible using retrospective designs.

Neuroglia Molecular Mechanisms in Psychiatric Disorders

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889456987 Year: Pages: 154 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-698-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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Neuropsychiatric disorders have long been considered as specific dysfunctions of neuronal functions. Studies of the recent decade, however, have challenged this simplistic view, highlighting the important role played by neuroglial cells in the onset and/or progression of neuropsychiatric diseases. In the central nervous system (CNS) non-excitable neuroglia are represented by cells of ectodermal origin (astrocytes, mainly responsible for CNS homeostasis and oligodendrocytes that provide myelination and support for axons) and mesodermal origin (microglial cells that are scions of foetal macrophages entering the neural tube early in development; these cells provide for CNS defence and contribute to shaping neuronal networks). Pathological changes of neuroglia are complex; these changes are classified into reactive gliosis (astrogliosis, activation of microglia and hypertrophy of oligodendroglial precursors), gliodegeneration with loss of function and glial pathological remodelling. Combination of these processes defines the evolution of neurological diseases in general and neuropsychiatric disorders in particular.In this research topic we addressed the contribution of neuroglia to major neuropsychiatric pathologies including major depression, schizophrenia, and addictive disorders.

Zurück in den Alltag – Mütter nach Behandlung ihrer Alkoholabhängigkeit

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ISBN: 9783863882921 9783863887285 Year: Pages: 156 DOI: 10.3224/863887285 Language: German
Publisher: Verlag Barbara Budrich
Subject: Gender Studies
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-22 11:21:07
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What challenges do mothers face after treating alcohol dependence? The study conducted by the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in cooperation with the Forel Clinic focuses on mothers who have undergone in-patient or day-care treatment. The results of the qualitative study provide an insight into the lives of these mothers returning to their everyday lives.

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