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Transfer Cells

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194742 Year: Pages: 126 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-474-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:33
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Transfer cells are anatomically specialized cells optimized to support high levels of nutrient transport in plants. These cells trans-differentiate from existing cell types by developing extensive and localized wall ingrowth labyrinths to amplify plasma membrane surface area which in turn supports high densities of membrane transporters. Unsurprisingly, therefore, transfer cells are found at key anatomical sites for nutrient acquisition, distribution and exchange. Transfer cells are involved in delivery of nutrients between generations and in the development of reproductive organs and also facilitate the exchange of nutrients that characterize symbiotic associations. Transfer cells occur across all taxonomic groups in higher plants and also in algae and fungi. Deposition of wall ingrowth-like structures are also seen in “syncytia” and “giant cells” which function as feeding sites for cyst and root-knot nematodes, respectively, following their infection of roots. Consequently, the formation of highly localized wall ingrowth structures in diverse cell types appears to be an ancient anatomical adaption to facilitate enhanced rates of apoplasmic transport of nutrients in plants. In some systems a role for transfer cells in the formation of an anti-pathogen protective barrier at these symplastic discontinuities has been inferred. Remarkably, the extent of cell wall ingrowth development at a particular site can show high plasticity, suggesting that transfer cell differentiation might be a dynamic process adapted to the transport requirements of each physiological condition. Recent studies exploiting different experimental systems to investigate transfer cell biology have identified signaling pathways inducing transfer cell development and genes/gene networks that define transfer cell identity and/or are involved in building the wall ingrowth labyrinths themselves. Further studies have defined the structure and composition of wall ingrowths in different systems, leading in many instances to the conclusion that this process may involve previously uncharacterized mechanisms for localized wall deposition in plants. Since transfer cells play important roles in plant development and productivity, the latter being relevant to crop yield, especially so in major agricultural species such as wheat, barley, soybean and maize, understanding the molecular and cellular events leading to wall ingrowth deposition holds exciting promise to develop new strategies to improve plant performance, a key imperative in addressing global food security. This Research Topic presents a timely and comprehensive treatise on transfer cell biology to help define critical questions for future research and thereby generating a deeper understanding of these fascinating and important cells in plant biology.

The Role of MicroRNAs in Plants

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ISBN: 9783039287307 / 9783039287314 Year: Pages: 174 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-731-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Nutrition and Food Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Discovered in plants at the turn of the century, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be fundamental to many aspects of plant biology. These small (20–24 nt) regulatory RNAs are derived via processing from longer imperfect double-stranded RNAs. They are then incorporated into silencing complexes, which they guide to (m)RNAs of high sequence complementarity, resulting in gene silencing outcomes, either via RNA degradation and/or translational inhibition. Some miRNAs are ancient, being present in all species of land plants and controlling fundamental processes such as phase change, organ polarity, flowering, and leaf and root development. However, there are many more miRNAs that are much less conserved and with less understood functions. This Special Issue contains seven research papers that span from understanding the function of a single miRNA family to examining how the miRNA profiles alter during abiotic stress or nutrient deficiency. The possibility of circular RNAs in plants acting as miRNA decoys to inhibit miRNA function is investigated, as was the hierarchical roles of miRNA biogenesis factors in the maintenance of phosphate homeostasis. Three reviews cover the potential of miRNAs for agronomic improvement of maize, the role of miRNA-triggered secondary small RNAs in plants, and the potential function of an ancient plant miRNA.

Plant Proteomic Research 2.0

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ISBN: 9783039210626 9783039210633 Year: Pages: 594 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-063-3 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Plant Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:07
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Advancements in high-throughput “Omics” techniques have revolutionized plant molecular biology research. Proteomics offers one of the best options for the functional analysis of translated regions of the genome, generating a wealth of detailed information regarding the intrinsic mechanisms of plant stress responses. Various proteomic approaches are being exploited extensively for elucidating master regulator proteins which play key roles in stress perception and signaling, and these approaches largely involve gel-based and gel-free techniques, including both label-based and label-free protein quantification. Furthermore, post-translational modifications, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions provide deeper insight into protein molecular function. Their diverse applications contribute to the revelation of new insights into plant molecular responses to various biotic and abiotic stressors.

Keywords

Phalaenopsis --- petal --- pollination --- senescence --- 2-DE --- ROS --- Medicago sativa --- leaf cell wall proteome --- cadmium --- quantitative proteomics --- 2D DIGE --- chloroplast --- elevated CO2 --- heat stress --- nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase --- (phospho)-proteomics --- photosynthesis --- protein phosphorylation --- 14-3-3 proteins --- Oryza sativa L. --- starch --- sucrose --- N utilization efficiency --- proteomics --- 2D --- protein phosphatase --- rice isogenic line --- SnRK1 --- 14-3-3 --- lettuce --- bolting --- proteome --- high temperature --- iTRAQ --- proteome profiling --- iTRAQ --- differentially abundant proteins (DAPs) --- drought stress --- physiological responses --- Zea mays L. --- GS3 --- ? subunit --- heterotrimeric G protein --- mass spectrometric analysis --- RGG3 --- rice --- western blotting --- Dn1-1 --- ?-subunit --- heterotrimeric G protein --- mass spectrometry analysis --- RGG4 --- rice --- western blotting --- Clematis terniflora DC. --- polyphenol oxidase --- virus induced gene silencing --- photosynthesis --- glycolysis --- Camellia sinensis --- chlorotic mutation --- chlorophyll deficiency --- weakening of carbon metabolism --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- degradome --- wheat --- cultivar --- protease --- papain-like cysteine protease (PLCP) --- subtilase --- metacaspase --- caspase-like --- wheat leaf rust --- Puccinia recondita --- Stagonospora nodorum --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- somatic embryogenesis --- pyruvate biosynthesis --- Zea mays --- chlorophylls --- LC-MS-based proteomics --- pea (Pisum sativum L.) --- proteome functional annotation --- proteome map --- seeds --- seed proteomics --- late blight disease --- potato proteomics --- Phytophthora infestans --- Sarpo Mira --- early and late disease stages --- Simmondsia chinensis --- cold stress --- proteomics --- leaf --- iTRAQ --- Ricinus communis L. --- cold stress --- seed imbibition --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- Morus --- organ --- gel-free/label-free proteomics --- flavonoid --- antioxidant activity --- phosphoproteome --- barley --- seed dormancy --- germination --- imbibition --- after-ripening --- sugarcane --- Sporisorium scitamineum --- smut --- proteomics --- RT-qPCR --- ISR --- holm oak --- Quercus ilex --- 2-DE proteomics --- shotgun proteomics --- non-orthodox seed --- population variability --- stresses responses --- ammonium --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- carbon metabolism --- nitrogen metabolism --- nitrate --- proteomics --- root --- secondary metabolism --- proteomics --- wheat --- silver nanoparticles --- plant pathogenesis responses --- data-independent acquisition --- quantitative proteomics --- Pseudomonas syringae --- sweet potato plants infected by SPFMV --- SPV2 and SPVG --- sweet potato plants non-infected by SPFMV --- SPV2 and SPVG --- co-infection --- transcriptome profiling --- gene ontology --- pathway analysis --- lesion mimic mutant --- leaf spot --- phenylpropanoid biosynthesis --- proteomics --- isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) --- rice --- affinity chromatography --- ergosterol --- fungal perception --- innate immunity --- pattern recognition receptors --- plasma membrane --- proteomics --- proteomics --- maize --- plant-derived smoke --- shoot --- Solanum tuberosum --- patatin --- seed storage proteins --- vegetative storage proteins --- tuber phosphoproteome --- targeted two-dimensional electrophoresis --- B. acuminata petals --- MALDI-TOF/TOF --- GC-TOF-MS --- qRT-PCR --- differential proteins --- n/a

Fertilizer Application on Crop Yield

Author:
ISBN: 9783038976547 Year: Pages: 252 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-655-4 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Agriculture (General) --- Biology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 10:34:31
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Abstract

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue Fertilizer Application on Crop Yield that was published in Agronomy

Keywords

soil organic matter --- soil biota --- soil acidity --- soil erosion --- fertilizer management --- site-specific nutrient management --- balanced use of fertilizers --- integrated nutrient management --- agronomic response --- calcium --- Copper --- NPK amendments --- Value Cost Ratio --- Zinc --- nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) --- nitrate assimilation --- nitrate reductase activity --- maize --- nitrate --- ammonia --- NADH --- NADH-dehydrogenase --- Complex I --- site-specific K management --- soil K supply --- maize yield response to K --- maize crop manager --- nutrient expert for maize --- durum wheat --- mineral N --- organic N --- S fertilization --- grain quality --- grain yield --- phosphorous --- potassium --- corn–soybean rotation --- management --- production system --- organic farming --- conventional farming --- organic nutrients --- chemical fertilizers --- global food demand --- agroforestry system --- evergreen agriculture --- biofertilizer --- Bacillus pumilus --- growth promotion --- N fertilizer --- rice --- yield --- green manure --- nitrogen uptake --- Orychophragmus violaceus L. --- soil nitrogen pools --- grain yield --- Zea mays L. --- hybrid rice --- K use efficiency --- potassium --- saline tract --- soil N supply --- soil N mineralization --- N fertilization --- potentially mineralizable N --- humid Mediterranean climate --- conservation agriculture --- NUE --- nitrogen recovery efficiency --- nitrogen physiological recovery --- wheat yields --- Agrotain® urea --- rice-wheat system --- organic farming --- forage legume --- long-term productivity --- soil health --- economics --- integrated nutrient management --- rice --- wheat --- yield --- net returns --- soil health --- sustainability

Jasmonic Acid Pathway in Plants

Author:
ISBN: 9783039284887 / 9783039284894 Year: Pages: 346 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-489-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Plant Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivative, an amino acid conjugate of JA (jasmonoyl isoleucine, JA-Ile), are signaling compounds involved in the regulation of defense and development in plants. The number of articles studying on JA has dramatically increased since the 1990s. JA is recognized as a stress hormone that regulates the plant response to biotic stresses such as herbivore and pathogen attacks, as well as abiotic stresses such as wounding and ultraviolet radiation. Recent studies have remarkably progressed the understanding of the importance of JA in the life cycle of plants. JA is directly involved in many physiological processes, including stamen growth, senescence, and root growth. JA regulates production of various metabolites such as phytoalexins and terpenoids. Many regulatory proteins involved in JA signaling have been identified by screening for Arabidopsis mutants. However, much more remains to be learned about JA signaling in other plant species. This Special Issue, “Jasmonic Acid Pathway in Plants”, contains 5 review and 15 research articles published by field experts. These articles will help with understanding the crucial roles of JA in its response to the several environmental stresses and development in plants.

Keywords

albino --- aroma --- Camellia sinensis --- chloroplast --- jasmonic acid --- light-sensitive --- stress --- tea --- volatile --- Panax ginseng --- gene expression --- ginsenoside --- methyl jasmonate --- MYB transcription factor --- dammarenediol synthase --- jasmonic acid --- signaling pathway --- environmental response --- biological function --- MeJA --- priming --- rice --- proteomics --- ROS --- chlorophyll fluorescence imaging --- MAP kinase --- jasmonate --- rice bacterial blight --- salicylic acid --- grain development --- Prunus avium --- Tuscan varieties --- jasmonic acid --- lipoxygenase --- bioinformatics --- gene expression --- heterotrimeric G proteins --- AtRGS1 --- jasmonates --- endocytosis --- diffusion dynamics --- Chinese flowering cabbage --- leaf senescence --- JA --- transcriptional activation --- adventitious rooting --- auxin --- ectopic metaxylem --- ectopic protoxylem --- ethylene --- hypocotyl --- jasmonates --- nitric oxide --- xylogenesis --- transcriptional regulators --- plant development --- jasmonic acid signaling --- gene expression --- Jasmonate-ZIM domain --- JAZ repressors --- Jas domain --- TIFY --- degron --- phylogenetic analysis --- ancestral sequences --- circadian clock --- jasmonic acid --- crosstalk --- jasmonic acid --- fatty acid desaturase --- multiseeded --- msd --- grain number --- MutMap --- sorghum --- Ralstonia solanacearum --- type III effector --- jasmonic acid --- salicylic acid --- Nicotiana plants --- PatJAZ6 --- jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway --- Pogostemon cablin --- patchouli alcohol --- biosynthesis --- jasmonate --- salt response --- Zea mays --- ROS --- proline --- ABA biosynthesis --- jasmonic acid --- crosstalk --- gibberellic acid --- cytokinin --- auxin --- jasmonic acid --- opr3 --- stress defense --- quantitative proteomics --- abiotic stresses --- jasmonates --- JA-Ile --- JAZ repressors --- transcription factor --- signaling --- antioxidant enzyme activity --- elicitor --- methyl jasmonate --- secondary metabolite --- signal molecules --- n/a

Plant Protein and Proteome Altlas--Integrated Omics Analyses of Plants under Abiotic Stresses

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9783039219605 / 9783039219612 Year: Pages: 558 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-961-2 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Integrative omics of plants in response to stress conditions play more crucial roles in the post-genomic era. High-quality genomic data provide more deeper understanding of how plants to survive under environmental stresses. This book is focused on concluding the recent progress in the Protein and Proteome Atlas in plants under different stresses. It covers various aspects of plant protein ranging from agricultural proteomics, structure and function of proteins, and approaches for protein identification and quantification.

Keywords

proteomic --- postharvest freshness --- ATP synthase --- ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit (chloroplast) --- chlorophyll fluorescence parameters --- photosynthetic parameters --- drought stress --- Triticum aestivum L. --- comparative proteomic analysis --- iTRAQ --- VIGS --- Jatropha curcas --- phosphoproteomics --- seedling --- chilling stress --- regulated mechanism --- Alternanthera philoxeroides --- proteomic --- stem --- potassium --- stress --- Salinity stress --- Dunaliella salina --- isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation --- differentially abundant proteins --- proteomics --- arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi --- salt stress --- E. angustifolia --- proteomics --- wheat --- root --- wood vinegar --- drought stress --- ROS --- ABA --- proteome --- maize --- AGPase --- phosphorylation --- brittle-2 --- phos-tagTM --- MIPS --- exon-intron structure diversity --- Gossypium hirsutum --- loss-of-function mutant --- root cell elongation --- CHA-SQ-1 --- cytomorphology --- pollen abortion --- proteomics --- wheat --- cotton --- somatic embryogenesis --- transdifferentiation --- quantitative proteomics --- regulation and metabolism --- molecular basis --- concerted network --- maize --- phosphoproteomics --- salt tolerance --- label-free quantification --- root and shoot --- sugar beet --- salt stress --- S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase --- ROS --- antioxidant enzyme --- cotton --- somatic embryogenesis --- transdifferentiation --- widely targeted metabolomics --- purine metabolism --- flavonoid biosynthesis --- molecular and biochemical basis --- transcript-metabolite network --- leaf sheath --- maturation --- transcriptional dynamics --- transcriptome --- abiotic stress --- silicate limitation --- diatom --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- photosynthesis --- carbon fixation --- natural rubber biosynthesis --- mass spectrometry --- rubber grass --- rubber latex --- shotgun proteomics --- Taraxacum kok-saghyz --- two-dimensional gel electrophoresis --- visual proteome map --- proteomics --- wheat --- drought --- leaf --- iTRAQ --- micro-exons --- constitutive splicing --- alternative splicing --- ancient genes --- domain --- radish --- heat stress --- transcriptome sequencing --- lncRNA --- miRNA --- physiological response --- Millettia pinnata --- woody oilseed plants --- seed development --- miRNA --- nitrogen fertilizer --- rice --- proteome --- cultivars --- nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) --- Nelumbo nucifera --- phylogeny --- genomics --- molecular mechanisms --- model plant --- proteomes --- iTRAQ --- filling kernel --- drought stress --- heat shock proteins --- Zea mays L. --- wucai --- low-temperature stress --- high-temperature stress --- proteomics --- redox homeostasis --- GLU1 --- glutathione --- heat response --- heat-sensitive spinach variety --- proteomics --- ROS scavenging --- inositol --- phosphatidylinositol --- phosphatase --- stress --- signaling pathway --- integrated omics --- plants under stress --- post-genomics era --- proteome atlas --- quantitative proteomics

Plant Genetics and Molecular Breeding

Author:
ISBN: 9783039211753 9783039211760 Year: Pages: 628 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-176-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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The development of new plant varieties is a long and tedious process involving the generation of large seedling populations for the selection of the best individuals. While the ability of breeders to generate large populations is almost unlimited, the selection of these seedlings is the main factor limiting the generation of new cultivars. Molecular studies for the development of marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategies are particularly useful when the evaluation of the character is expensive, time-consuming, or with long juvenile periods. The papers published in the Special Issue “Plant Genetics and Molecular Breeding” report highly novel results and testable new models for the integrative analysis of genetic (phenotyping and transmission of agronomic characters), physiology (flowering, ripening, organ development), genomic (DNA regions responsible for the different agronomic characters), transcriptomic (gene expression analysis of the characters), proteomic (proteins and enzymes involved in the expression of the characters), metabolomic (secondary metabolites), and epigenetic (DNA methylation and histone modifications) approaches for the development of new MAS strategies. These molecular approaches together with an increasingly accurate phenotyping will facilitate the breeding of new climate-resilient varieties resistant to abiotic and biotic stress, with suitable productivity and quality, to extend the adaptation and viability of the current varieties.

Keywords

sugarcane --- cry2A gene --- particle bombardment --- stem borer --- resistance --- NPK fertilizers --- agronomic traits --- molecular markers --- quantitative trait loci --- common wild rice --- Promoter --- Green tissue-specific expression --- light-induced --- transgenic chrysanthemum --- WRKY transcription factor --- salt stress --- gene expression --- DgWRKY2 --- Cucumis sativus L. --- RNA-Seq --- DEGs --- sucrose --- ABA --- drought stress --- Aechmea fasciata --- squamosa promoter binding protein-like --- flowering time --- plant architecture --- bromeliad --- Oryza sativa --- endosperm development --- rice quality --- WB1 --- the modified MutMap method --- abiotic stress --- Cicer arietinum --- candidate genes --- genetics --- heat-stress --- molecular breeding --- metallothionein --- Brassica --- Brassica napus --- As3+ stress --- broccoli --- cytoplasmic male sterile --- bud abortion --- gene expression --- transcriptome --- RNA-Seq --- sesame --- genome-wide association study --- yield --- QTL --- candidate gene --- cabbage --- yellow-green-leaf mutant --- recombination-suppressed region --- bulk segregant RNA-seq --- differentially expressed genes --- marker–trait association --- haplotype block --- genes --- root traits --- D-genome --- genotyping-by-sequencing --- single nucleotide polymorphism --- durum wheat --- bread wheat --- complex traits --- Brassica oleracea --- Ogura-CMS --- iTRAQ --- transcriptome --- pollen development --- rice --- OsCDPK1 --- seed development, starch biosynthesis --- endosperm appearance --- Chimonanthus praecox --- nectary --- floral scent --- gene expression --- Prunus --- flowering --- bisulfite sequencing --- genomics --- epigenetics --- breeding --- AP2/ERF genes --- Bryum argenteum --- transcriptome --- gene expression --- stress tolerance --- SmJMT --- transgenic --- Salvia miltiorrhiza --- overexpression --- transcriptome --- phenolic acids --- Idesia polycarpa var --- glycine --- FAD2 --- linoleic acid --- oleic acid --- anther wall --- tapetum --- pollen accumulation --- OsGPAT3 --- rice --- cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) --- phytohormones --- differentially expressed genes --- pollen development --- Brassica napus --- Rosa rugosa --- RrGT2 gene --- Clone --- VIGS --- Overexpression --- Tobacco --- Flower color --- Anthocyanin --- sugarcane --- WRKY --- subcellular localization --- gene expression pattern --- protein-protein interaction --- transient overexpression --- soybean --- branching --- genome-wide association study (GWAS) --- near-isogenic line (NIL) --- BRANCHED1 (BRC1) --- TCP transcription factor --- Zea mays L. --- MADS transcription factor --- ZmES22 --- starch --- flowering time --- gene-by-gene interaction --- Hd1 --- Ghd7 --- rice --- yield trait --- Oryza sativa L. --- leaf shape --- yield trait --- molecular breeding --- hybrid rice --- nutrient use efficiency --- quantitative trait loci (QTLs), molecular markers --- agronomic efficiency --- partial factor productivity --- P. suffruticosa --- R2R3-MYB --- overexpression --- anthocyanin --- transcriptional regulation --- ethylene-responsive factor --- Actinidia deliciosa --- AdRAP2.3 --- gene expression --- waterlogging stress --- regulation --- Chrysanthemum morifolium --- WUS --- CYC2 --- gynomonoecy --- reproductive organ --- flower symmetry --- Hs1pro-1 --- cZR3 --- gene pyramiding --- Heterodera schachtii --- resistance --- tomato --- Elongated Internode (EI) --- QTL --- GA2ox7 --- n/a

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