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The axe had never sounded

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Book Series: Aboriginal History Monograph ISBN: 9781921313219 Year: Pages: 141 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_458827 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Archaeology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

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‘This book meets well the triple promise of the title – the inter-connections of place, people and heritage. John Mulvaney brings to this work a deep knowledge of the history, ethnography and archaeology of Tasmania. He presents a comprehensive account of the area’s history over the 200 years since French naval expeditions first charted its coastlines. The important records the French officers and scientists left of encounters with Aboriginal groups are discussed in detail, set in the wider ethnographic context and compared with those of later expeditions. ‘The topical issues of understanding the importance of Recherche Bay as a cultural landscape and its protection and future management inform the book. Readers will be challenged to consider the connections between people and place, and how these may constitute significant national heritage.’ Professor Isabel McBryde, AO, FRAI, FAHA, FSA The Australian National University

Keywords

archaeology --- history --- tasmania --- ethnography

Iteration:Again: 13 Public Art Projects across Tasmania

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ISBN: 9780615811147 Year: Pages: 176 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0037.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:44
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Iteration:Again documents and reflects upon a series of thirteen temporary public art commissions by twenty-one Australian and international artists that took place across Tasmania from September 18 to October 15, 2011. Produced by Contemporary Art Spaces Tasmania and David Cross, in conjunction with seven partner curators, Iteration:Again presents a compelling array of temporary artworks in largely unexpected places throughout Tasmania. Working to transform our experience of place for a moment in time, each commission seeks to address how temporary interventions or responses by artists to public sites, environments and buildings can serve to open up new ways of understanding Tasmania as a place with very complex cultural, social and spatial resonances. How it might be possible to introduce transformative elements that challenge the notion of a fixed or definitive artwork grounded in one location? By asking the artists to make four different chapters or ‘iterations’ over the course of a four-week period, David Cross challenged each practitioner to think through how change or processes of transition may function to make the art experience an unstable and contingent one. This idea of incorporating change into the work highlights a growing interest by artists in emphasizing art as a potentially theatrical or even fictive medium with the audience experiencing different moments or stages of encounter over a number of weeks. The idea provided for the possibility of narrative sequences, formal investigations, or temporal shifts that saw key additions or subtractions over time. Each commission sought to recast our understanding of public artwork from a discrete event or viewing experience, to a suite of experiences.

Australia's Fertility Transition

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ISBN: 9781760463366 Year: Pages: 318 DOI: 10.22459/AFT.2020 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Biology --- Public Health --- Sociology --- History --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-03-04 11:21:02
License: ANU Press

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"In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, most countries in Europe and English-speaking countries outside Europe experienced a fertility transition, where fertility fell from high levels to relatively low levels. England and the other English-speaking countries experienced this from the 1870s, while fertility in Australia began to fall in the 1880s. This book investigates the fertility transition in Tasmania, the second settled colony of Australia, using both statistical evidence and historical sources. The book examines detailed evidence from the 1904 New South Wales Royal Commission into the Fall in the Birth Rate, which the Commissioners regarded as applying not only to NSW, but to every state in Australia. Many theories have been proposed as to why fertility declined at this time: theories of economic and social development; economic theories; diffusion theories; the spread of secularisation; increased availability of artificial methods of contraception; and changes in the rates of infant and child mortality. The role of women in the fertility transition has generally been ignored. The investigation concludes that fertility declined in Tasmania in the late 19th century in a period of remarkable social and economic transformation, with industrialisation, urbanisation, improvements in transport and communication, increasing levels of education and opportunities for social mobility. One of the major social changes was in the status and role of women, who became the driving force behind the fertility decline."

"Me Write Myself"

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Book Series: Australian History ISBN: 9781925495638 9781925523867 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Monash University Publishing Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102633
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-19 11:21:02
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Exiles, lost souls, remnants of a dying race ... The fate of the First Nations peoples of Van Diemens Land is one of the most infamous chapters in Australian history. The men, women and children exiled to Flinders Island in the 1830s and 40s have often been written about, but never allowed to speak for themselves. This book aims to change that. Documents penned by the exiles during their 15 years at the settlement Wybalenna offer a compelling counter-narrative to traditional representations of a hopeless, dispossessed, illiterate people's final days. The exiles did not see themselves as prisoners, but as a Free People. Seen through their own writing, the community at Wybalenna was vibrant, complex and evolving. Rather than a depressed people simply waiting for death, their own words reveal a politically astute community engaged in a 15 year campaign for their own freedom. This book tells a compelling story that will profoundly affect understandings of Tasmanian and Australian history.

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