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Vascular Inflammation in Systemic Autoimmunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450909 Year: Pages: 148 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-090-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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Abstract

Plasticity and dynamism characterize the immune system as a tissue-integrating network with defensive functions. Blood and lymphatic vessel trees constitute the most evident and intuitive physical platform for the development of the net of interactions between immune cells, body tissues and foreign agents. Moreover vessel repair and immune patrolling are intimately linked physiological functions with common evolutionary roots. Not surprisingly variable degrees of vascular inflammation are often detectable in the setting of systemic inflammation and autoimmunity, whereas research in the field of cardiovascular pathology is progressively converging towards the identification of a common inflammatory background. The definition of the role of vascular inflammation in causing, sustaining and/or predicting the development of systemic autoimmunity constitute a challenging, unexplored frontier towards the development of a new generation of treatments and a better patient care.

A living history of immunology

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196982 Year: Pages: 62 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-698-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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In the highly competitive world of biomedical science, often the rush to publish and to be recognized as "first" with a new discovery, concept or method, is lost in the hurly-burly of the moment, as "the maddening crowd" moves on to the next "new thing". One of the great things about immunology today is that it has only become mature as a science within the last half-century, and especially within the past 35 years as a consequence of the revolution of molecular immunology, which has taken place only since 1980. Consequently, most of those who have contributed to our new understanding of how the immune system functions are still alive and well, and still contributing. Thus, "A Living History of Immunology" collates many stories from the investigators who actually performed the experiments that have established the frontiers of immunology. Accordingly, this volume combats "revisionist science", by those who want to alter history by telling the stories a different way than actually happened. In this regard, one of the good things about science vs. other disciplines is that we have the written record of what was done, when it was done and by whom. Even so, we do not have the complete story or narrative of how and why experiments were done, and what made the differences that led to success. This volume captures and chronicles some of these stories from the past fifty years in immunology.

Immune Checkpoint Molecules and Cancer Immunotherapy

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889457328 Year: Pages: 197 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-732-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Oncology --- Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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For the faultless function of the immune system, tight regulation of immune cell activation, immuno-suppression and the strength and efficiency of the immune response is essential. Immune checkpoint (ICP) molecules can amplify or dampen signals that lead to the modulation of specific immune activities. Under physiological conditions, immune checkpoints are essential to prevent autoimmune manifestations and to preserve self-tolerance. They help modulate immune responses by either promoting or inhibiting T-cell activation. However, in the context of cancer, malignant cells can dysregulate the expression of immune checkpoint proteins on immune cells in order to suppress anti-tumor immune responses and to gain immune resistance. Moreover, tumor cells themselves can also express some checkpoints proteins, thereby enabling these cells to externally orchestrate immune regulatory mechanisms. Several recent studies have confirmed that the expression of immune checkpoints could be an important prognostic parameter for cancer development and for patient outcome. Therefore, cancer immunotherapy based on the modulation of immune checkpoint molecules alone, or in combination with conventional tumor therapy (chemo- or/and radiotherapy), is now in focus as a means of developing new therapeutic strategies for different types of cancer. The two well-known molecules – CTLA4 and PD-1 - serve as important examples of such checkpoint proteins of important therapeutic potential. Thus far, inhibitors of CTLA4 and PD-1 have been approved to treat only a limited number of malignancies (e.g. malignant Melanoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer). Many others are currently under investigation and the list of immune checkpoint molecules for potential therapeutic targeting is still growing. However, the clinical response to inhibitors of checkpoint molecules is not sufficient in all cases. Therefore, further studies are needed to improve our knowledge of such immunomodulatory proteins and their associated signaling pathways. Several key signaling pathways which are involved in the regulation of expression of checkpoint molecules in immune cells and in cancer cells have already been identified including MAPK, PI3K, NF-kB, JAKs and STATs. These (and future discovered) signaling pathways could give rise to the development of new strategies for modulating the expression of ICPs and thereby, improving anti-cancer immune responses. The main aim of the Research Topic is to collect novel findings from scientists involved in basic research on immune checkpoints as well as in translational studies investigating the use of checkpoint inhibtors in immunotherapy in experimental settings. We welcome the submission of Review, Mini-Review and Original Research articles that cover the following topics: 1. Molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ICP expression in immune and/or cancer cells.2. Characterization of signaling pathways downstream ICP molecules.3. Cellular responses to ICP blockade.4. Identification of new compounds interfering with ICP expression and/or signaling.5. ICP-mediated interactions between cancer cells and immune cells. 6. Functional links between ICP and cytokines/chemokines.7. Molecular mechanisms of ICP inhibition in the context of experimental cancer immunotherapy.

Polyamine Metabolism in Disease and Polyamine-Targeted Therapies

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ISBN: 9783039211524 / 9783039211531 Year: Pages: 240 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-153-1 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Abstract

Polyamines are ubiquitous polycations essential for all cellular life. The most common polyamines in eukaryotes, spermine, spermidine, and putrescine, exist in millimolar intracellular concentrations that are tightly regulated through biosynthesis, catabolism, and transport. Polyamines interact with, and regulate, negatively charged macromolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and ion channels. Accordingly, alterations in polyamine metabolism affect cellular proliferation and survival through changes in gene expression and transcription, translation, autophagy, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of these multifaceted polyamine functions contribute to multiple disease processes, thus their metabolism and function have been targeted for preventive or therapeutic intervention. The correlation between elevated polyamine levels and cancer is well established, and ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting biosynthetic enzyme in the production of putrescine, is a bona fide transcriptional target of the Myc oncogene. Furthermore, induced polyamine catabolism contributes to carcinogenesis that is associated with certain forms of chronic infection and/or inflammation through the production of reactive oxygen species. These and other characteristics specific to cancer cells have led to the development of polyamine-based agents and inhibitors aimed at exploiting the polyamine metabolic pathway for chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive benefit. In addition to cancer, polyamines are involved in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, parasitic and infectious diseases, wound healing, ischemia/reperfusion injuries, and certain age-related conditions, as polyamines are known to decrease with age. As in cancer, polyamine-based therapies for these conditions are an area of active investigation. With recent advances in immunotherapy, interest has increased regarding polyamine-associated modulation of immune responses, as well as potential immunoregulation of polyamine metabolism, the results of which could have relevance to multiple disease processes. The goal of this Special Issue of Medical Sciences is to present the most recent advances in polyamine research as it relates to health, disease, and/or therapy.

Keywords

polyamine transport inhibitor --- Drosophila imaginal discs --- difluoromethylorthinine --- DFMO --- polyamine --- cancer --- metabolism --- difluoromethylornithine --- polyamine transport inhibitor --- pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma --- curcumin --- diferuloylmethane --- ornithine decarboxylase --- polyamine --- NF-?B --- chemoprevention --- carcinogenesis --- polyphenol --- ornithine decarboxylase --- polyamines --- untranslated region --- polyamines --- ?-difluoromethylornithine --- polyamine transport system --- melanoma --- mutant BRAF --- spermine --- spermidine --- putrescine --- polyamine metabolism --- mast cells --- eosinophils --- neutrophils --- M2 macrophages --- airway smooth muscle cells --- Streptococcus pneumoniae --- polyamines --- pneumococcal pneumonia --- proteomics --- capsule --- complementation --- metabolism --- cadaverine --- polyamines --- ornithine decarboxylase --- difluoromethylornithine --- eflornithine --- DFMO --- African sleeping sickness --- hirsutism --- colorectal cancer --- neuroblastoma --- aging --- atrophy --- autophagy --- oxidative stress --- polyamines --- skeletal muscle --- spermidine --- spermine oxidase --- transgenic mouse --- immunity --- T-lymphocytes --- B-lymphocytes --- tumor immunity --- metabolism --- epigenetics --- autoimmunity --- polyamines --- ornithine decarboxylase --- polyamine analogs --- spermidine/spermine N1-acetyl transferase --- spermine oxidase --- bis(ethyl)polyamine analogs --- breast cancer --- MCF-7 cells --- transgenic mice --- polyamines --- MYC --- protein synthesis in cancer --- neuroblastoma --- protein expression --- antizyme 1 --- ornithine decarboxylase --- CRISPR --- human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) --- cell differentiation --- DFMO --- ornithine decarboxylase --- osteosarcoma --- polyamines --- polyamines --- polyamine metabolism --- antizyme --- antizyme inhibitors --- ornithine decarboxylase --- Snyder-Robinson Syndrome --- spermine synthase --- X-linked intellectual disability --- polyamine transport --- spermidine --- spermine --- transglutaminase

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