Search results: Found 3

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Intra- and inter-species interactions in microbial communities

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194490 Year: Pages: 149 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-449-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Recent developments in various “OMICs” fields have revolutionized our understanding of the vast diversity and ubiquity of microbes in the biosphere. However, most of the current paradigms of microbial cell biology, and our view of how microbes live and what they are capable of, are derived from in vitro experiments on isolated strains. Even the co-culturing of mixed species to interrogate community behavior is relatively new. But the majority of microorganisms lives in complex communities in natural environments, under varying conditions, and often cannot be cultivated. Unless we obtain a detailed understanding of the near-native 3D ultrastructure of individual community members, the 3D spatial community organization, their metabolic interdependences, coordinated gene expression and the spatial organization of their macromolecular machines inventories as well as their communication strategies, we won’t be able to truly understand microbial community life. How spatial and also temporal organization in cell–cell interactions are achieved remains largely elusive. For example, a key question in microbial ecology is what mechanisms microbes employ to respond when faced with prey, competitors or predators, and changes in external factors. Specifically, to what degree do bacterial cells in biofilms act individually or with coordinated responses? What are the spatial extent and coherence of coordinated responses? In addition, networks linking organisms across a dynamic range of physical constraints and connections should provide the basis for linked evolutionary changes under pressure from a changing environment. Therefore, we need to investigate microbial responses to altered or adverse environmental conditions (including phages, predators, and competitors) and their macromolecular, metabolic responses according to their spatial organization. We envision a diverse set of tools, including optical, spectroscopical, chemical and ultrastructural imaging techniques that will be utilized to address questions regarding e.g. intra- and inter-organism interactions linked to ultrastructure, and correlated adaptive responses in gene expression, physiological and metabolic states as a consequence of the alterations of their environment. Clearly strategies for co-evolution and in general the display of adaptive strategies of a microbial network as a response to the altered environment are of high interest. While a special focus will be placed on terrestrial sole-species or mixed biofilms, we are also interested in aquatic systems, biofilms in general and microbes living in symbiosis. In this Research Topic, we wish to summarize and review results investigating interactions and possibly networks between microbes of the same or different species, their co-occurrence, as well as spatiotemporal patterns of distribution. Our goal is to include a broad spectrum of experimental and theoretical contributions, from research and review articles to hypothesis and theory, aiming at understanding microbial interactions at a systems level.

Behavioural and Ecological Consequences of Urban Life in Birds

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454976 Year: Pages: 364 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-497-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Ecology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Urbanization is next to global warming the largest threat to biodiversity. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that many bird species get locally extinct as a result of urban development. However, many bird species benefit from urbanization, especially through the abundance of human-provided resources, and increase in abundance and densities. These birds are intriguing to study in relation to its resilience and adaption to urban environments, but also in relation to its susceptibility and the potential costs of urban life. This Research Topic consisting of 30 articles (one review, two meta-analyzes and 27 original data papers) provides insights into species and population responses to urbanization through diverse lenses, including biogeography, community ecology, behaviour, life history evolution, and physiology.

The causes and consequences of microbial community structure

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193615 Year: Pages: 184 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-361-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-19 16:29:12
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The causes and consequences of differences in microbial community structure, defined here as the relative proportions of rare and abundant organisms within a community, are poorly understood. Articles in "The Causes and Consequences of Microbial Community Structure", use empirical or modeling approaches as well as literature reviews to enrich our mechanistic understanding of the controls over the relationship between community structure and ecosystem processes. Specifically, authors address the role of trait distributions and tradeoffs, species-species interactions, evolutionary dynamics, community assembly processes and physical controls in affecting ‘who’s there’ and ‘what they are doing’.

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Frontiers Media SA (3)


License

CC by (3)


Language

english (3)


Year
From To Submit

2018 (1)

2015 (2)