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Yosano Akiko and The Tale of Genji

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Book Series: Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies ISBN: 9780472902002 Year: Pages: 235 DOI: 10.3998/mpub.18495 Language: Japanese
Publisher: University of Michigan Press Grant: National Endowment for the Humanities - [grantnumber unknown]
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-05 00:01:50
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The Tale of Matsura

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Book Series: Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies ISBN: 9780472901593 Year: Pages: 223 DOI: 10.3998/mpub.18817 Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-05 00:02:31
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Fujiwara Teika is known as the premier poet and literary scholar of the early 13th century. It is not so widely known that he also tried his hand at fiction: Mumyozoshi (Untitled Leaves; ca. 1201) refers to “several works” by Teika and then names Matsura no miya monogatari (The Tale of Matsura; ca. 1190) as the only one that can be considered successful. The work is here translated in full, with annotation. Set in the pre-Nara period, The Tale of Matsura is the story of a young Japanese courtier, Ujitada, who is sent to China with an embassy and has a number of supernatural experiences while there. Affairs of the heart dominate The Tale of Matsura, as is standard for courtly tales. Several of its other features break the usual mold, however: its time and setting; the military episode that would seem to belong instead in a war tale; scenes depicting the sovereign’s daily audiences, in which formal court business is conducted; a substantial degree of specificity in referring to things Chinese; a heavy reliance on fantastic and supernatural elements; an obvious effort to avoid imitating The Tale of Genji as other late-Heian tales had done; and a most inventive ending. The discussion in the introduction briefly touches upon each of these features, and then focuses at some length on how characteristics associated with the poetic ideal of yoen inform the tale. Evidence relating to the date and authorship of the tale is explored in two appendixes.

Sukeroku’s Double Identity

Book Series: Michigan Papers in Japanese Studies ISBN: 9780472901906 Year: Pages: 113 DOI: 10.3998/mpub.18683 Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-05 00:02:55
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The aim of this book is to show that seemingly illogical double identity of the townsman, Sukeroku, and the samurai, Soga Goro, in the play Sukeroku is a surviving element of what was once a complex and coherent structure based on a traditional performance calendar. To show how the calendar function and what Sukeroku's double identity signifies, the book is divided into two parts. Part One studies the structure of Edo kabuki. The first chapter, which outlines that structure, is based for the most part on writings of the Tokugawa period. The second chapter then looks at the concepts of sekai, "tradition," and shuko, "innovation." Kabuki was the product of material that had become a familiar part of Japanese culture by repeated use and dramatization over long periods of time, starting before kabuki began, and material that was relatively new and was used to transform the older, set material. The double identity in Sukeroku came about as a result of this interplay between what was received by way of traditional and what was added by way of innovation. Part Two considers the significance of the double identity. The author concludes that Sukeroku's double identity gave Edo audiences a hero who was an idealization of the contemporary Tokugawa townsman and at the same time a transformation of a samurai god-hero of the past. The first chapter of Part Two traces the development of Sukeroku's Soga Goro/samurai identity, from its origins in the early dramatic forms of no, kowaka, and ko-joruri, to the representation of Soga Goro in kabuki by Ichikawa Danjuro I. The seconds then looks at the transformation of Soga Gorointo Sukeroku by discussing the origins of Sukeroku and its introductions to Edo kabuki by Ichikawa Danjuro I and his son, Danjuro II, since their work was the basis of all later developments.

Early Public Libraries and Colonial Citizenship in the British Southern Hemisphere

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Book Series: New Directions in Book History ISBN: 9783030204266 Year: Pages: 159 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-20426-6 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2020-02-05 11:21:03
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This open access Pivot book is a comparative study of six early colonial public libraries in nineteenth-century Australia, South Africa, and Southeast Asia. Drawing on networked conceptualisations of empire, transnational frameworks, and ‘new imperial history’ paradigms that privilege imbricated colonial and metropolitan ‘intercultures’, it looks at the neglected role of public libraries in shaping a programme of Anglophone civic education, scientific knowledge creation, and modernisation in the British southern hemisphere. The book’s six chapters analyse institutional models and precedents, reading publics and types, book holdings and catalogues, and regional scientific networks in order to demonstrate the significance of these libraries for the construction of colonial identity, citizenship, and national self-government as well as charting their influence in shaping perceptions of social class, gender, and race. Using primary source material from the recently completed ‘Book Catalogues of the Colonial Southern Hemisphere’ digital archive, the book argues that public libraries played a formative role in colonial public discourse, contributing to broader debates on imperial citizenship and nation-statehood across different geographic, cultural, and linguistic borders.

The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age

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ISBN: 9780472071197 9780472051199 Year: Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-06 14:29:55
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The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age, which features a wide range of practitioner-scholars, is the first of its kind: a gathering of people who are expert in American literary studies and in digital technologies, scholars uniquely able to draw from experience with building digital resources and to provide theoretical commentary on how the transformation to new technologies alters the way we think about and articulate scholarship in American literature. The volume collects articles from those who are involved in tool development, usability testing, editing and textual scholarship, digital librarianship, and issues of race and ethnicity in digital humanities, while also situating digital humanities work within the larger literary discipline. In addition, the volume examines the traditional structures of the fields, including tenure and promotion criteria, modes of scholarly production, the skill sets required for scholarship, and the training of new scholars. The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age will attract practitioners of digital humanities in multiple fields, Americanists who utilize digital materials, and those who are intellectually curious about the new movement and materials.

Disabled Bodies in Early Modern Spanish Literature

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Book Series: Representations: Health, Disability, Culture and Society ISBN: 9781786940780 9781786948441 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Liverpool University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102602
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 06:28:26
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Disabled Bodies in Early Modern Spanish Literature examines the concepts and role of women in selected Spanish discourses and literary texts from the late fifteenth to seventeenth centuries from the perspective of feminist disability theories. It explores a wide range of Spanish medical, regulatory and moral discourses, illustrating how such texts inherit, reproduce and propagate an amalgam of Western traditional concepts of female embodiment. It goes on to examine concrete representations of deviant female characters, focusing on the figures of syphilitic prostitutes and physically decayed aged women in literary texts such as Celestina, Lozana andaluza and selected works by Cervantes and Quevedo. Finally, an analysis of the personal testimony of Teresa de Avila, a nun suffering neurological disorders, complements the discussion of early modern women’s disability.

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