Search results: Found 4

Listing 1 - 4 of 4
Sort by
The American Automobile Industry

Author:
Book Series: Michigan Papers in Japanese Studies ISBN: 9780472902064 Year: Pages: 119 DOI: 10.3998/mpub.11903719 Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press Grant: National Endowment for the Humanities||Andrew W. Mellon Foundation - [grantnumber unknown]||[grantnumber unknown]
Subject: Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-25 00:09:10
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Amid the gloom, indeed the despair, that prevailed among auto industry spokesmen during early 1981, the University of Michigan held the first U.S.-Japan Auto Conference. With all the uncertainty that accompanies a march into new territory, the conference very much resembled a call to arms as industry, union, and government officials sought to comprehend and respond to the Japanese challenge. In the subsequent two conferences in 1982 and 1983, the concerned parties displayed an impressive willingness to roll up their sleeves and get on with creating the conditions for a renewal of the industry. Yet success seemed to elude their efforts, and frustrations mounted as the national recession lengthened and deepened. It was not until the March 1984 conference that definite change in tone became apparent. By this time, it was clear that the industry was beginning to reap the fruits of its efforts. As Paul McCracken notes in his remarks, the market for new cars was manifesting its traditional high-geared response to improved business conditions, and the voluntary trade restraints were contributing to the ability of the industry to take advantage of this renewed prosperity. In addition, those who know the industry well knew that the major improvements in quality and productivity had been made, and many of the changes responsible for these improvements seem unlikely to be reversed. All this was much on the minds of speakers and participants during the March conference. The various speakers presented an image of people who thought that they were pretty much on the way toward addressing successfully their internal problems of productivity, quality, and marketing. All that remained was to dispose of the external factors that prevented the, from competing on that well-known if elusive "level playing field." [ix]

The American and Japanese Auto Industries in Transition

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780472902057 Year: Pages: 251 DOI: 10.3998/mpub.18623 Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press Grant: National Endowment for the Humanities||Andrew W. Mellon Foundation - [grantnumber unknown]||[grantnumber unknown]
Subject: Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-25 00:09:17
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This report was prepared for the Policy Board by the U.S. and Japanese research staffs of the Joint U.S.–Japan Automotive Study under the general direction of Professors Paul W. McCracken and Keichi Oshima, with research operations organized and coordinated by Robert E. Cole on the U.S. side, in close communication with the Taizo Yakushiji on the Japanese side. [preface] In view of the importance of stable, long-term economic relationships between Japan and the United States, automotive issues have to be dealt with in ways consistent with the joint prosperity of both countries. Furthermore, the current economic friction has the potential to adversely affect future political relationships. Indeed, under conditions of economic stagnation, major economic issues inevitably become political issues. With these considerations in mind, the Joint U.S.–Japan Automotive Study project was started in September 1981 to determine the conditions that will allow for the prosperous coexistence of the respective automobile industries. During this two-year study, we have identified four driving forces that will play a major role in determining the future course of the automotive industry of both countries. These are: (1) consumers’ demands and aspirations vis-à-vis automobiles; (2) flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); (3) rapidly evolving technology; and (4) the internationalization of the automotive industry. [exec. summary]

The Economics of Two-way Interconnection

Author:
Book Series: Forschungsergebnisse der Wirtschaftsuniversitaet Wien ISBN: 9783631754832 Year: Pages: 86 DOI: 10.3726/b13999 Language: English
Publisher: Peter Lang International Academic Publishing Group
Subject: Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-10-03 00:14:45
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

For his research on the topic of this book Ulrich Berger was awarded the Research Prize of the Vodafone Foundation and the WU Best Paper Award. This book studies the economics of telecommunications networks characterized by two-way interconnection. Special emphasis is put on the role of access charges. Starting from the standard model used in the literature on network competition, the effect of departing from three of this model’s less realistic assumptions is investigated. First, call externalities are integrated into the model. Secondly, competition between three or more networks is studied in a dynamic setting. Finally, a local interaction structure between agents is introduced to replace the unrealistic assumption of balanced calling patterns. In each of these cases, some of the conventional wisdom on the role of access charges is overturned by new results.

Futures Past. Economic Forecasting in the 20th and 21st Century

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Literatur – Kultur – Oekonomie / Literature – Culture – Economy ISBN: 9783631818695 Year: Pages: 220 DOI: 10.3726/b16817 Language: English
Publisher: Peter Lang International Academic Publishing Group
Subject: History --- Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2020-10-06 00:05:18
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Few areas in economics are as controversial as economic forecasting. While the field has sparked great hopes for the prediction of economic trends and events throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, economic forecasts have often proved inaccurate or unreliable, thus provoking severe criticism in times of unpredicted crisis. Despite these failures, economic forecasting has not lost its importance. Futures Past considers the history and present state of economic forecasting, giving a fascinating account of the changing practices involved, their origins, records, and their implications. By bringing together economists, historians, and sociologists, this volume offers fresh perspectives on the place of forecasting in modern industrial societies, thereby making a broader claim for greater interdisciplinary cooperation in the history of economics.

Listing 1 - 4 of 4
Sort by
Narrow your search