Search results: Found 2

Listing 1 - 2 of 2
Sort by
Faking, Forging, Counterfeiting

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Edition Kulturwissenschaft ISBN: 9783837637625 9783839437629 Year: Language: English
Publisher: transcript Verlag Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 101227
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-16 11:02:30
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Forgeries are an omnipresent part of our culture. They are closely related to historically and culturally informed ideas of authenticity, legality, authorship, creativity, tradition and innovation. Based on the concept of mimesis, the volume illustrates that forgeries are thus not to be understood as a negative copy or disgraced rip-off of an original – but as an autonomous aesthetic practice, a creative act in itself. The contributions focus on such different implementations such as faked traditions, pseudotranslations, imposters, identity theft, and hoaxes in different arts and historic contexts. Most importantly, they scrutinize the bonds and borders between original and forgery, and turn out their epistemic capability.

Art Markets and Digital Histories

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039219704 / 9783039219711 Year: Pages: 156 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-971-1 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: History of arts --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-07 23:07:09
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This Special Issue of Arts investigates the use of digital methods in the study of art markets and their histories. As historical and contemporary data is rapidly becoming more available, and digital technologies are becoming integral to research in the humanities and social sciences, we sought to bring together contributions that reflect on the different strategies that art market scholars employ to navigate and negotiate digital techniques and resources. The essays in this issue cover a wide range of topics and research questions. Taken together, the essays offer a reflection on what takes to research art markets, which includes addressing difficult topics such as the nature of the research questions and the data available to us, and the conceptual aspects of art markets, in order to define and operationalize variables and to interpret visual and statistical patterns for scholarship. In our view, this discussion is enriched when also taking into account how to use shared or interoperable ontologies and vocabularies to define concepts and relationships that facilitate the use and exchange of linked (open) data for cultural heritage and historical research.

Listing 1 - 2 of 2
Sort by
Narrow your search
-->