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Role of lipids in virus assembly

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195824 Year: Pages: 91 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-582-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
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Abstract

RNA enveloped viruses comprise several families belonging to plus and minus strand RNA viruses, such as retroviruses, flavoviruses and orthomyxoviruses. Viruses utilize cellular lipids during critical steps of replication like entry, assembly and egress. Growing evidence indicate important roles for lipids and lipid nanodomains in virus assembly. This special topic covers key aspects of virus-membrane interactions during assembly and egress, especially those of retroviruses and Ebola virus (EBOV). Virus assembly and release involve specific and nonspecific interactions between viral proteins and membrane compartments. Retroviral Gag proteins assemble predominantly on the PM. Despite the great progress in identifying the factors that modulate retroviral Gag assembly on the PM, there are still gaps in our understanding of precise mechanisms of Gag-membrane interactions. Studies over the last two decades have focused on the mechanisms by which other retroviral Gag proteins interact with membranes during assembly. These include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), murine leukemia virus (MLV), and human T-lymphotropic virus type (HTLV-1). Additionally, assembly of filoviruses such as EBOV also occurs on the inner leaflet of the PM. The articles published under this special topic highlight the latest understanding of the role of membrane lipids during virus assembly, egress and release.

Keywords

retroviruses --- HIV 1 --- Gag --- Matrix --- membrane --- NMR --- Ebola --- VP40

One Health and Zoonoses

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ISBN: 9783039212958 9783039212965 Year: Pages: 140 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-296-5 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Public Health
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 16:10:12
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Abstract

The One Health concept recognizes that the health of humans, animals, and their ecosystems are interconnected, and that a coordinated, collaborative, multidisciplinary, and cross-sectoral approach is necessary to fully understand and respond to potential or existing risks that originate at the animal–human–ecosystems interfaces. Thus, the One Health concept represents a holistic vision for addressing some of the complex challenges that threaten human and animal health, food safety, and the environments in which diseases flourish. There are many examples showing how the health of humans is related to the health of animals and the environment. Diseases shared between humans and animals are zoonoses. Some zoonoses have been known for many years, whereas others have emerged suddenly and unexpectedly. Over 70% of all new emerging diseases over the past few decades have been zoonoses that have emerged from wildlife, most often from bats, rodents, or birds. Examples of zoonoses are many and varied, ranging from rabies to bovine tuberculosis, and from Japanese encephalitis to SARS. Clearly, a One Health approach is essential for understanding their ecology, and for outbreak response and the development of control strategies. However, the One Health concept and approach is much broader than zoonoses; it extends to including antimicrobial resistance, food safety, and environmental health and, consequently, impacts on global health security, economic wellbeing, and international trade. It is this breadth of One Health that connects the papers in this Special Issue.

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