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Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

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Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

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Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

The Disappearing Body: Dissection to the Extremities (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

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Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Becoming Really Dead: Dying by Degrees (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

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Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Mapping Punishment: Provincial Places to Dissect (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

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Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

He that Hath an Ill-Name Is Half-Hanged: The Anatomical Legacy of the Criminal Corpse (Book chapter)

Book title: Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Author:
Book Series: Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife ISBN: 9781137582485 Year: Pages: 326 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095904
Subject: Science (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:02

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Abstract

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832.

Conserving health in early modern culture: Bodies and environments in Italy and England

Authors: ---
Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526113474 Year: Pages: 344 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095760
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:31

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"Conserving health in early modern culture explores the impact of ideas about healthy living in early modern England and Italy. The attention of medical historians has largely been focussed on the study of illness and medical treatment, yet prevention was one of the cornerstones of early modern medicine. According to Galenic-Hippocratic thought, the preservation of health depended on the careful management of the so-called six ‘Non-Naturals’: the air one breathed; food and drink; excretions; sleep; movement and rest; and emotions. Drawing on visual, material and textual sources, the contributors show the pervasiveness of the preventive paradigm in early modern culture and society. In particular it becomes apparent that concern for the non-naturals informed lay people’s daily lives and routines as well as stimulating innovation in material culture and painting, and influencing discourses in fields as diverse as geology, natural philosophy and religion.&#xD;&#xD;At the same time the volume challenges the common assumption that health advice was a uniform and stable body of knowledge, showing instead that models of healthy living were tailored to different genders, age-groups and categories of patients; they also varied over time and depended on the geographical context. In particular, significant differences emerge between what was regarded as beneficial or harmful to health in England and Italy.&#xD;&#xD;As well as showing the value of a comparative perspective of study, this interdisciplinary volume will appeal to a wide readership, interested not just in health practices, but in print culture, histories of women, infancy, the environment and of art and material culture."

Chapter 4 'She sleeps well and eats an egg’: convalescent care in early modern England (Book chapter)

Author:
Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526113498 Year: Pages: 29 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 095760
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-10 11:01:04
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"Very little is known about early modern approaches to convalescence and the author investigates the measures were taken by physicians and laypeople to restore health after illness. Drawing on medical texts, regimens, letters, and diaries, this chapter shows that the treatment of the convalescent differed both from the care of the sick and the healthy. It shows the vital place of the non-naturals in early modern medicine, and the role played by ‘Nature’, understood as the body’s principal agent and governor in physiological processes. The author finds that the 'six non-natural things' were on the one hand used as a way of gauging the extent of recovery, and on the other, were manipulated in a therapeutic role to ensure that both strength and flesh were restored. Thus, any remaining humours which might cause a relapse must be evacuated: good sleep, improved appetite and an ability to exercise were all signs of improvement but each, managed appropriately, also helped to restore strength, whilst negative emotions could endanger recovery and in its place cheerfulness –which was a restorative-must be encouraged."

Chapter 3 ‘Ordering the infant’ (Book chapter)

Author:
Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526113498 Year: Pages: 24 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-10 11:02:10
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This chapter focuses on the specific forms of health care given to newborn babies in early modern England, a hitherto almost entirely neglected category in histories of health. Drawing on printed health advice and correspondence the chapter charts the various stages of the care offered to newborns, which was based on very specific management of the six non-naturals appropriate to their uniquely hot, damp constitutions, and fragile, malleable bodies. This care was determined particularly by attentive observation and physical ‘searching’ of the body. It was crucial to ensure first that all forms of ‘excretion’ were possible: whether via the mouth or the anal passage; whether excreting excessive moisture from the throat, stomach and brain through crying or removing excrements from the skin through wiping and bathing. Gentle forms of exercise were necessary and procured through crying, bathing or gentle rubbing of the skin. Excessive crying however endangered its health and carers were given advice on calming and soothing babies whilst sleep was of utmost importance, not only in terms of duration but also the baby’s position whilst sleeping.

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