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The Bacterial Cell: Coupling between Growth, Nucleoid Replication, Cell Division and Shape

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198177 Year: Pages: 324 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-817-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Bacterial Physiology was inaugurated as a discipline by the seminal research of Maaløe, Schaechter and Kjeldgaard published in 1958. Their work clarified the relationship between cell composition and growth rate and led to unravel the temporal coupling between chromosome replication and the subsequent cell division by Helmstetter et al. a decade later. Now, after half a century this field has become a major research direction that attracts interest of many scientists from different disciplines. The outstanding question how the most basic cellular processes - mass growth, chromosome replication and cell division - are inter-coordinated in both space and time is still unresolved at the molecular level. Several particularly pertinent questions that are intensively studied follow: (a) what is the primary signal to place the Z-ring precisely between the two replicating and segregating nucleoids? (b) Is this coupling related to the structure and position of the nucleoid itself? (c) How does a bacterium determine and maintain its shape and dimensions? Possible answers include gene expression-based mechanisms, self-organization of protein assemblies and physical principles such as micro-phase separations by excluded volume interactions, diffusion ratchets and membrane stress or curvature. The relationships between biochemical reactions and physical forces are yet to be conceived and discovered. This e-book discusses the above mentioned and related questions. The book also serves as an important depository for state-of-the-art technologies, methods, theoretical simulations and innovative ideas and hypotheses for future testing. Integrating the information gained from various angles will likely help decipher how a relatively simple cell such as a bacterium incorporates its multitude of pathways and processes into a highly efficient self-organized system. The knowledge may be helpful in the ambition to artificially reconstruct a simple living system and to develop new antibacterial drugs.

Advances in Plastid Biology and Its Applications

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450480 Year: Pages: 159 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-048-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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One of the distinguishing features of plants is the presence of membrane-bound organelles called plastids. Starting from proplastids (undifferentiated plastids) they readily develop into specialised types, which are involved in a range of cellular functions such as photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation, biosynthesis of sucrose, starch, chlorophyll, carotenoids, fatty acids, amino acids, and secondary metabolites as well as a number of metabolic reactions. The central role of plastids in many aspects of plant cell biology means an in-depth understanding is key for a holistic view of plant physiology. Despite the vast amount of research, the molecular details of many aspects of plastid biology remains limited. Plastids possess their own high-copy number genome known as the plastome. Manipulation of the plastid genome has been developed as an alternative way to developing transgenic plants for various biotechnological applications. High-copy number of the plastome, site-specific integration of transgenes through homologous recombination, and potential to express proteins at high levels (>70% of total soluble proteins has been reported in some cases) are some of the technologies being developed. Additionally, plastids are inherited maternally, providing a natural gene containment system, and do not follow Mendelian laws of inheritance, allowing each individual member of the progeny of a transplastomic line to uniformly express transgene(s). Both algal and higher plant chloroplast transformation has been demonstrated, and with the ability to be propagated either in bioreactors or in the field, both systems are well suited for scale up of production. The manipulation of chloroplast genes is also essential for many approaches that attempt to increase biomass accumulation or re-routing metabolic pathways for biofortification, food and fuel production. This includes metabolic engineering for lipid production, adapting the light harvesting apparatus to improve solar conversion efficiencies and engineering means of suppressing photorespiration in crop species, which range from the introduction of artificial carbon concentrating mechanisms, or those pre-existing elsewhere in nature, to bypassing ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase entirely. The purpose of this eBook is to provide a compilation of the latest research on various aspects of plastid biology including basic biology, biopharming, metabolic engineering, bio-fortification, stress physiology, and biofuel production.One of the distinguishing features of plants is the presence of membrane-bound organelles called plastids. Starting from proplastids (undifferentiated plastids) they readily develop into specialised types, which are involved in a range of cellular functions such as photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation, biosynthesis of sucrose, starch, chlorophyll, carotenoids, fatty acids, amino acids, and secondary metabolites as well as a number of metabolic reactions. The central role of plastids in many aspects of plant cell biology means an in-depth understanding is key for a holistic view of plant physiology. Despite the vast amount of research, the molecular details of many aspects of plastid biology remains limited. Plastids possess their own high-copy number genome known as the plastome. Manipulation of the plastid genome has been developed as an alternative way to developing transgenic plants for various biotechnological applications. High-copy number of the plastome, site-specific integration of transgenes through homologous recombination, and potential to express proteins at high levels (>70% of total soluble proteins has been reported in some cases) are some of the technologies being developed. Additionally, plastids are inherited maternally, providing a natural gene containment system, and do not follow Mendelian laws of inheritance, allowing each individual member of the progeny of a transplastomic line to uniformly express transgene(s). Both algal and higher plant chloroplast transformation has been demonstrated, and with the ability to be propagated either in bioreactors or in the field, both systems are well suited for scale up of production. The manipulation of chloroplast genes is also essential for many approaches that attempt to increase biomass accumulation or re-routing metabolic pathways for biofortification, food and fuel production. This includes metabolic engineering for lipid production, adapting the light harvesting apparatus to improve solar conversion efficiencies and engineering means of suppressing photorespiration in crop species, which range from the introduction of artificial carbon concentrating mechanisms, or those pre-existing elsewhere in nature, to bypassing ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase entirely. The purpose of this eBook is to provide a compilation of the latest research on various aspects of plastid biology including basic biology, biopharming, metabolic engineering, bio-fortification, stress physiology, and biofuel production.

Modulating Prokaryotic Lifestyle by DNA-Binding Proteins

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451050 Year: Pages: 296 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-105-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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The Overview of the Topic was the following: “One of the most active areas of research in molecular microbiology has been the study of how bacteria modulate their genetic activity and its consequences. The prokaryotic world has received much interest not only because the resulting phenomena are important to cells, but also because many of the effects often can be readily measured. Contributing to the interest of the present topic is the fact that modulation of gene activity involves the sensing of intra- and inter-cellular conditions, DNA binding and DNA dynamics, and interaction with the replication/transcription machinery of the cell. All of these processes are fundamental to the operation of a genetic entity and condition their lifestyle. Further, the discoveries achieved in the bacterial world have been of ample use in eukaryotes. In addition to the fundamental interest of understanding modulation of prokaryotic lifestyle by DNA-binding proteins, there is an added interest from the healthcare point of view. As it is well known the antibiotic-resistance strains of pathogenic bacteria are a major world problem, so that there is an urgent need of innovative technologies to tackle it. Most of the acquired resistances are spread by processes of horizontal gene transfer mediated by mobile elements in which DNA replication and gene expression are of basic interest. There is an imperative of finding new alternatives to the ‘classical’ way of treatment of bacterial infections and these new alternatives include the discovery of new drugs and of new bacterial targets. Nevertheless, these new alternatives will find a dead-end if we are unable to obtain a better understanding of the basic processes modulating bacterial gene expression. Our goal to achieve with this Topic of Frontiers is to accelerate our understanding of protein-DNA interactions. First, the topic will bring together several very active researchers in the study of gene replication, gene regulation, the strategies applied by the different proteins that participate in these processes, and their consequences. We will also acquire an in-depth knowledge of some of the mechanisms of gene regulation, gene transfer and gene replication. Further, the readers of the papers will realize the importance of the topic and will learn the most recent thinking, results, and approaches in the area”. We are fully confident that we have exceeded our expectations. Now we are proud to present the final output of the Topic, which is the eBook. It includes 24 articles contributed by 118 authors. As of today, Monday, 16th, January 2017, the total number of readings has reached 19,284, 14,921 article views, and 2,944 article downloads.

Molecular Biology of Bamboo mosaic Virus - A Type Member of the Potexvirus Genus

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454396 Year: Pages: 109 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-439-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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The flexible filamentous plant viruses are responsible for more than half of all agricultural loss worldwide. Potexvirus is one of the two most important flexible filamentous plant viruses. Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV), a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus, is a member of the Potexvirus genus of Alphaflexiviridae. It can infect at least 12 species of bamboo, causing a huge economic impact on the bamboo industry in Taiwan. The study of BaMV did not start extensively until the completion of the full-length sequencing of genomic RNA of BaMV and generation of the BaMV infectious cDNA clone in the early 1990s. Since then, BaMV has been extensively studied at the molecular, cellular and ecological level, covering both basic and applied researches, by a group of researchers in Taiwan. In this eBook, the content comprises 6 reviews and 4 articles. Seven of them are involved in the infection of BaMV covering viral RNA replication, viral RNA trafficking, and the host factors. Two of them are related to the vector transmission and the ecology of BaMV. The last one is the application of using BaMV as a viral vector to produce vaccines in plants.

Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

ISBN: 9783038420774 9783038420767 Year: Pages: 356 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Added to DOAB on : 2015-10-22 09:09:45
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The discovery of KSHV in 1994 was a historical landmark in tumor virology and human cancer research. Its subsequent identification as a cause of Kaposi sarcoma and in association with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease soon attracted up to hundreds of research laboratories and thousands of virologists and oncologists to switch their research directions. To date, PubMed has collected nearly 5000 papers on KSHV from numerous journal publications in the world. These studies reiterate that the global fight against human cancers will continue to receive great support from our tremendous efforts in searching for new tumor-causing viruses and in understanding the basic biology of tumor viruses. To celebrate the 20th years of KSHV discovery, I am very proud to be an invited Guest Editor for a special issue on KSHV in the journal "Viruses" and happy to assemble all published articles from the special issue into this book, Kaposi Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus. The collected articles cover almost all aspects of KSHV, including updated reviews and research articles on KSHV epidemiology and transmission, KSHV interaction with host cell receptors and cell entry, KSHV latency and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), molecular biology of KSHV lytic reactivation and lytic switch control by KSHV ORF50 and other factors, KSHV post-transcriptional regulator ORF57, molecular biology of KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA) and PAN as a lncRNA in epigenetic gene regulation of KSHV, viral mimics of cellular genes in KSHV infection and disease, KSHV targeted therapy, KSHV miRNAs and vGPCR, etc. In particular, I am greatly honored to have Yuan Chang and Patrick Moore to mark the first 20 years of KSHV research by recounting the historical stories leading to their astonish discovery and Science publication of KSHV that has led us where we are today. The book is also intended to assist Medical students and residents, dermatologists, hematologist, oncologists, and other related specialties to understand what we have known about KSHV and its infections and pathogenesis.

Stem Cell Genetic Fidelity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194902 Year: Pages: 110 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-490-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Genetics --- Science (General) --- Oncology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-16 15:44:59
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The vision of this Frontiers in Oncology Research Topic on "Stem Cell Genetic Fidelity" had the goal of steeping a diverse range of research perspectives to a first comprehensive synthesis of thought on the questions of how tissue stem cells manage gene mutation rate and the significance of that management in mammalian evolution and biology, in particular as it relates to tissue cell renewal, carcinogenesis, and aging. The primary focus was determinants of mutation rate in distributed stem cells (DSCs), which encompass all naturally occurring stem cells at all stages of mammalian development. In particular, contributions were sought that considered a broad range of aspects of the immortal DNA strand hypothesis for DSC genetic fidelity. Though proposed in 1975, only in the last decade has this landmark concept in tissue cell biology emerged as a central discussion in DSC research with increasing scrutiny and discussion by an increasing number of laboratories of diverse research perspectives and experimental approaches. With this hypothesis presenting a formidable technical challenge for experimental investigation, as would be expected, both supportive and unsupportive reports have been lining up. In the case of supportive studies, neither the range of applicable tissues nor the responsible molecular mechanisms are known; and the essential genomic process, non-random DNA template strand inheritance by asymmetrically self-renewing DSCs, has been suggested to potentially have other cellular roles besides reducing mutation rate. A major aspiration of this Research Topic was to create the first comprehensive, critical synthesis of current insights and viewpoints on the impact of the immortal DNA strand hypothesis in the history of DSC mutation research. A wide range of article types was considered including historical perspectives, critical reviews, critical commentaries, new hypotheses, new research perspectives, technical advances, and original research reports. Although treatments of the immortal DNA strand hypothesis were the major focus, the desired synthesis required integration of related ideas on mechanisms of DSC mutagenesis and its impact in the evolution of mammals, the emergence of cancers, and stem cell aging. As such, investigators focused on issues in e.g., germ stem cell mutagenesis, effects of environmental mutagens on DSC mutation rate, DSC mutation and tissue aging, determinations of types of mutations in DSCs, and the role of DSC mutation in cancer initiation were invited. Similarly, although the specific goal of the Research Topic was to enlighten DSC genetic fidelity in humans and other mammalians, informing contributions based on studies in other model organisms were also welcomed. To achieve even better representation of current experience, advances, and ideas in this field of investigation, these early contributors were encouraged to extend the opportunity to others who shared their interest in advancing our understanding of the mutability of DSCs and its significance in human biology.

Advances in Flavivirus Research

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ISBN: 9783038424864 9783038424871 Year: Pages: VI, 192 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-487-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-25 13:14:10
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The flaviviruses are composed almost entirely of arthropod-borne viruses, a subset of which are responsible for millions of cases of human disease each year. Among these viruses are dengue virus—a scourge throughout the tropical regions of Asia and the Americas; yellow fever virus—the “original” hemorrhagic fever virus; and the recently emerged Zika virus. While the flaviviruses are related genetically, in their structure and in their replication processes, the dissimilarity of diseases caused by the flaviviruses is remarkable. In this Special Issue, primary research articles and reviews discuss topics ranging from broadly applicable questions of nuclear translocation of viral proteins to virus-specific envelope protein epitopes that may be associated with virus attenuation. Also included in this issue are articles discussing findings with less well known flaviviruses including pegivirus and Duck Tembusu virus. The latter provides a reminder that the flaviviruses not only impact humans, but other species as well.

DNA Replication Stress

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ISBN: 9783039213894 9783039213900 Year: Pages: 368 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-390-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 16:10:12
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This Special Issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS) is dedicated to the mechanisms mediated at the molecular and cellular levels in response to adverse genomic perturbations and DNA replication stress. The relevant proteins and processes play paramount roles in nucleic acid transactions to maintain genomic stability and cellular homeostasis. A total of 18 articles are presented which encompass a broad range of highly relevant topics in genome biology. These include replication fork dynamics, DNA repair processes, DNA damage signaling and cell cycle control, cancer biology, epigenetics, cellular senescence, neurodegeneration, and aging. As Guest Editor for this IJMS Special Issue, I am very pleased to offer this collection of riveting articles centered on the theme of DNA replication stress. The blend of articles builds upon a theme that DNA damage has profound consequences for genomic stability and cellular homeostasis that affect tissue function, disease, cancer, and aging at multiple levels and through unique mechanisms. I thank the authors for their excellent contributions, which provide new insight into this fascinating and highly relevant area of genome biology.

Keywords

barley --- chromosome --- DNA replication pattern --- EdU --- mutagens --- DNA replication --- DNA damage --- DNA repair --- genome integrity --- A549 cells --- H1299 cells --- heterogeneity --- DNA damage response --- 8-chloro-adenosine --- DNA replication --- S phase --- origin firing --- TopBP1 --- ATR --- DNA fiber assay --- APE2 --- ATR-Chk1 DDR pathway --- Genome integrity --- SSB end resection --- SSB repair --- SSB signaling --- DNA replication stress --- genome stability --- ubiquitin --- replication fork restart --- translesion synthesis --- template-switching --- homologous recombination --- Fanconi Anemia --- G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) --- aging --- DNA damage --- ?-arrestin --- G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) --- interactome --- G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2 (GIT2) --- ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) --- clock proteins --- energy metabolism --- neurodegeneration --- cellular senescence --- ageing --- Alzheimer’s disease --- multiple sclerosis --- Parkinson’s disease --- lipofuscin --- SenTraGorTM (GL13) --- senolytics --- DNA replication --- DNA repair --- DNA damage response --- DNA translocation --- DNA helicase --- superfamily 2 ATPase --- replication restart --- fork reversal --- fork regression --- chromatin remodeler --- C9orf72 --- ALS --- motor neuron disease --- R loops, nucleolar stress --- neurodegeneration --- Difficult-to-Replicate Sequences --- replication stress --- non-B DNA --- Polymerase eta --- Polymerase kappa --- genome instability --- common fragile sites --- Microsatellites --- cancer --- DNA double-strand repair --- premature aging --- post-translational modification --- protein stability --- replication stress --- Werner Syndrome --- Werner Syndrome Protein --- dormant origins --- replicative stress --- replication timing --- DNA damage --- genome instability --- cancer --- Thermococcus eurythermalis --- endonuclease IV --- AP site analogue --- spacer --- DNA repair --- DNA repair --- double strand break repair --- exonuclease 1 --- EXO1 --- mismatch repair --- MMR --- NER --- nucleotide excision repair --- strand displacements --- TLS --- translesion DNA synthesis --- POL? --- mutation frequency --- mutations spectra --- SupF --- mutagenicity --- oxidative stress --- DNA damage --- DNA repair --- replication --- 8-oxoG --- epigenetic --- gene expression --- helicase --- cell cycle checkpoints --- genomic instability --- G2-arrest --- cell death --- repair of DNA damage --- adaptation --- n/a

Recent Progress in Bunyavirus Research

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783038423935 9783038423928 Year: Pages: VIII, 224 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-14 11:52:43
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The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 isolates worldwide distributed into five genera (i.e., Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus). Many of these viruses are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The increasing number of reports on new emerging bunyaviruses and infection episodes makes it essential that we obtain a comprehensive understanding of bunyaviruses and their infection mechanisms. Although all bunyaviruses possesses a tripartite, negative-sense (or ambi-sense) RNA genome, they exhibit substantial differences in their structure, genome organization and replication strategies, which make functional interpolation across genus boundaries difficult.Fortunately, the bunyavirus field has witnessed many exciting new findings and breakthroughs in recent years. These discoveries span a wide spectrum of research areas, including structural characterization of viruses and viral proteins, the identification of new viruses, investigations into host switch and vectors of transmission, genome-based analysis of virus evolution and phylogenetic lineages, the development of new research tools, such as replicons and reverse genetics, molecular characterization of the virus life cycle at the cell level (i.e., cell entry, replication, transcription, translation, genome packaging, reassortment, and virus assembly, etc.), studies of virus–host interactions and host antiviral defense, the development of vaccines/drugs and the use of bunyaviruses for novel applications.This book includes both research and review papers that together provide a glimpse into the latest research on bunyaviruses and, at the same time, highlight some of the important research achievements made in recent years. Study topics of both a fundamental and applied nature are collated. An informed perspective for future research directions is provided and can stimulate research in some of the understudied areas.

New Advances on Zika Virus Research

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783038977643 Year: Pages: 552 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-765-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Internal medicine --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 10:34:31
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Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne member of the Flaviviridae family that historically has been associated with mild febrile illness. However, the recent outbreaks in Brazil in 2015 and its rapid spread throughout South and Central America and the Caribbean, together with its association with severe neurological disorders—including fetal microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults—have changed the historic perspective of ZIKV. Currently, ZIKV is considered an important public health concern that has the potential to affect millions of people worldwide. The significance of ZIKV in human health and the lack of approved vaccines and/or antiviral drugs to combat ZIKV infection have triggered a global effort to develop effective countermeasures to prevent and/or treat ZIKV infection. In this Special Issue of Viruses, we have assembled a collection of 32 research and review articles that cover the more recent advances on ZIKV molecular biology, replication and transmission, virus–host interactions, pathogenesis, epidemiology, vaccine development, antivirals, and viral diagnosis.

Keywords

Ziks virus --- silvestrol --- antiviral --- eIF4A --- hepatocytes --- flavivirus --- arbovirus --- Zika --- sexual transmission --- testis --- prostate --- Zika virus --- ZIKV --- rhesus macaques --- Non-human primates --- NHP --- infection --- natural history --- Asian-lineage --- African-lineage --- zika virus --- ZIKV–host interactions --- viral pathogenesis --- cell surface receptors --- antiviral responses --- viral counteraction --- cytopathic effects --- microcephaly --- ZIKV-associated neurologic disorders --- Zika virus --- serology --- flavivirus --- microsphere immunoassay --- validated --- optimised --- dengue virus --- ZIKV --- reporter virus --- cryptic promoter silencing --- full-length molecular clone --- subgenomic replicon --- plasmid toxicity --- Zika virus --- dengue viruses --- flavivirus --- ELISA --- indirect immunofluorescence --- plaque reduction neutralization test --- polymerase chain reaction --- cross-reactions --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- infectious cDNA --- replication --- gene expression --- neuropathogenesis --- viral genetic variation --- host genetic variation --- flavivirus --- Zika virus --- therapy --- host-directed antivirals --- Aedes aegypti --- RNA-seq --- insecticide resistance --- Zika virus --- detoxification and immune system responses --- Zika virus --- mosquito-borne flavivirus --- emerging arbovirus --- outbreak control --- molecular diagnostics --- laboratory preparedness --- assay standardization --- external quality assessment --- EQA --- QCMD --- flavivirus --- eye --- zika virus --- blood-retinal barrier --- ocular --- innate response --- Zika virus --- pregnancy --- fetal infection --- congenital Zika syndrome --- Asian lineage --- Zika virus --- Full-length cDNA infectious clones --- Bacterial artificial chromosome --- NS2A protein --- Zika virus --- neural progenitor cells --- neurons --- Zika virus --- antivirals --- therapeutics --- research models and tools --- flavivirus --- Zika virus (ZIKV) --- reverse genetics --- infectious clone --- full-length molecular clone --- bacterial artificial chromosome --- replicon --- infectious RNA --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- arbovirus --- sexual transmission --- host genetic variation --- immune response --- Zika virus --- flaviviruses --- vaccines --- virus like particles --- clinical trials --- ZIKV --- NS1 protein --- Zika virus --- diagnosis --- monoclonal antibodies --- ELISA --- zika virus --- placenta cells --- microglia cells --- siRNA --- TLR7/8 --- Zika --- viral evolution --- genetic variability --- Bayesian analyses --- Zika virus --- reverse genetics --- infectious cDNA --- Tet-inducible --- MR766 --- FSS13025 --- flavivirus --- ZIKV --- NS5 --- type I IFN antagonist --- point-of-care diagnostics --- isothermal nucleic acid amplification --- nucleic acid computation --- nucleic acid strand exchange --- zika virus --- mosquito --- mosquito surveillance --- multiplex nucleic acid detection --- boolean logic-processing nucleic acid probes --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- astrocytomas --- dsRNA --- viral fitness --- antiviral --- heme-oxygenase 1 --- Zika virus --- viral replication --- Zika virus --- antiviral compounds --- neural cells --- viral replication --- flavivirus --- Zika virus --- viral persistence --- testicular cells --- testes --- Zika virus --- prM-E proteins --- viral pathogenicity --- virus attachment --- viral replication --- viral permissiveness --- viral survival --- apoptosis --- cytopathic effects --- mutagenesis --- chimeric viruses --- human brain glial cells --- Zika virus --- flavivirus --- microRNAs --- neurons --- neuroinflammation --- anti-viral immunity --- Zika virus --- dengue virus --- secondary infections --- cross-reactions --- IgA --- IgG avidity tests

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