Search results: Found 26

Listing 11 - 20 of 26 << page
of 3
>>
Sort by
Rubinrote Federn, Walzähne und schimmerndes Perlmutt: polynesische Kosmologie in Ritualobjekten (Book chapter)

Book title: Kosmos: Weltentwürfe im Vergleich

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783858814517 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_615699 Language: German
Publisher: Scheidegger & Spiess Grant: FP7 Ideas: European Research Council - 324146
Subject: Astronomy (General) --- Social Sciences --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-27 11:01:21
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This article is concerned with cosmological concepts of the peoples of Polynesia in the Pacific. Following a creation myth from Tahiti, the authors explore the realms of te ao (the world of space and light which came to be inhabited by humans) and te po (the engulfing darkness, associated with the night, the ancestors and spirits) by investigating artefacts from the region. Certain qualities of the rare materials used in the highly skilled making, and the knowledge of the utilisation of these artefacts enabled pacific islanders to establish a connection to divine entities but also to protect themselves of their powers. Many of the cosmological principles finally can be rediscovered in the objects themselves, which therefore are a study of the cosmos in miniature.

Sensitive Objects: Affect and Material Culture

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9789187675669 9789188168610 Year: Pages: 285 DOI: 10.21525/kriterium.6 Language: English
Publisher: Kriterium
Subject: Psychology --- Ethnology --- Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-11 11:01:41
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"The study of affect has become a dynamic field spanning a range of disciplines from psychology over neuroscience to philosophy and cultural studies. Little attention however has been payed to material culture. This book presents an innovative set of ethnographies of the affective relations between people and things. It tackles the sensual experiences of materiality, through taste, sounds, smells and touch that are hard to verbalize or represent in images. Evocative situations are detailed, like for instance the packing of a suitcase at the splitting of a marriage; how people in the besieged Sarajevo were both helped and humiliated by the aid received from abroad; how the parting of objects after the parents’ death may result in siblings never talking to one another again. These ethnographies from Scandinavia, the Balkans and the US, focus on what affects do in everyday life rather than what they are. The volume is also provided with chapters that put the studies of affects in ethnology and anthropology in a wider scholarly frame and discuss theories and methods applied in the book. Sensitive Objects in the first place addresses scholars and students in Ethnology, Anthropology, Sociology and Cultural Studies, as well as other readers interested in affects and emotions, material culture, tourism, innovations, and post-socialism.

Piety in Pieces

Author:
ISBN: 9781783742356 Year: Pages: 412 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0094 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-22 11:01:37
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence. Made by highly specialised craftspeople (scribes, illuminators, book binders) with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials (parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants), books were expensive and built to last. They usually outlived their owners. Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts. These activities accelerated in the fifteenth century. Most manuscripts made before 1390 were bespoke and made for a particular client, but those made after 1390 (especially books of hours) were increasingly made for an open market, in which the producer was not in direct contact with the buyer. Increased efficiency led to more generic products, which owners were motivated to personalise. It also led to more blank parchment in the book, for example, the backs of inserted miniatures and the blanks ends of textual components. Book buyers of the late fourteenth and throughout the fifteenth century still held onto the old connotations of manuscripts—that they were custom-made luxury items—even when the production had become impersonal. Owners consequently purchased books made for an open market and then personalised them, filling in the blank spaces, and even adding more components later. This would give them an affordable product, but one that still smacked of luxury and met their individual needs. They kept older books in circulation by amending them, attached items to generic books to make them more relevant and valuable, and added new prayers with escalating indulgences as the culture of salvation shifted. Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire. Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation? "

Piety in Pieces : How Medieval Readers Customized their Manuscripts

Author:
ISBN: 9782821883970 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-06 13:15:39
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence. Made by highly specialised craftspeople (scribes, illuminators, book binders) with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials (parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants), books were expensive and built to last. They usually outlived their owners. Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts. These activities accelerated in the fifteenth century. Most manuscripts made before 1390 were bespoke and made for a particular client, but those made after 1390 (especially books of hours) were increasingly made for an open market, in which the producer was not in direct contact with the buyer. Increased efficiency led to more generic products, which owners were motivated to personalise. It also led to more blank parchment in the book, for example, the backs of inserted miniatures and the blanks ends of textual components. Book buyers of the late fourteenth and throughout the fifteenth century still held onto the old connotations of manuscripts-that they were custom-made luxury items-even when the production had become impersonal. Owners consequently purchased books made for an open market and then personalised them, filling in the blank spaces, and even adding more components later. This would give them an affordable product, but one that still smacked of luxury and met their individual needs. They kept older books in circulation by amending them, attached items to generic books to make them more relevant and valuable, and added new prayers with escalating indulgences as the culture of salvation shifted. Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire. Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation?

Photo-Objects: On the Materiality of Photographs and Photo Archives

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Studies 12: Max Planck Research Library for the History and Development of Knowledge ISBN: 9783945561546 Year: Pages: 328 Language: English
Publisher: Edition Open Access
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-14 11:51:27
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Photographs are not simply images but also historically shaped three-dimensional objects. They hold a physical presence, bear traces of handling and use, and circulate in social, political, and institutional networks. Beyond their visual content, they are increasingly acknowledged as material "actors", not only indexically representing the objects they depict, but also playing a crucial role in the processes of knowledge-making within scientific practices. This has a historical dimension: most scientific disciplines rapidly adopted photography as an important research tool. The various material qualities of photographs thereby afforded certain types of uses in those disciplines. Specialized photo archives were founded as interfaces of technology and science and as laboratories for scientific thought. This book highlights some recent approaches to photo-objects and photo archives as parts of a dynamic and material system of knowledge. Taking photographic materiality as its premise, it analyzes the epistemological potential of analog and digital photographs and photo archives in the humanities and sciences. Issues range from the circulation and distribution of photographs, the construction of disciplinary methods through the handling and use of photographs, the formation and transformation of a canon through photography and respective hierarchies of value, to the arrangement, classification, and working processes in photo archives and other institutions. The series Studies of the Max Planck Research Library for the History and Development of Knowledge is dedicated to key subjects in the history and development of knowledge. It brings together perspectives from different fields and combines source-based empirical research with theoretically guided approaches. Studies typically present collaborative working group volumes with integrative approaches to research. The volumes are available both as print-on-demand books and as open-access publications. The material is freely accessible online at www.mprl-series.mpg.de.

Communities and knowledge production in archaeology

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9781526134554 9781526134561 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102763
Subject: Archaeology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-02-20 11:21:03
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The dynamic processes of knowledge production in archaeology and elsewhere in the humanities and social sciences are increasingly viewed as the collaborative effort of groups, clusters and communities of researchers rather than the isolated work of so-called ‘instrumental’ actors. Shifting focus from the individual scholar to the wider social contexts of her work and the dynamic creative processes she participates in, this volume critically examines the importance of informal networks and conversation in the creation of knowledge about the past. Engaging with theoretical approaches such as the sociology and geographies of knowledge and Actor-Network Theory (ANT), and using examples taken from different archaeologies in Europe and North America from the seventeenth to the mid-twentieth century, the book caters to a wide readership, ranging from students of archaeology, anthropology, classics and science studies to the general reader.

Medieval Women, Material Culture, and Power

Author:
Book Series: Gender and Power in the Premodern World||Gender and Power in the Premodern World ISBN: 9781641891462 Year: Pages: 149 DOI: 10.17302/GP-9781641891462 Language: English
Publisher: Arc Humanities Press
Subject: Arts in general --- History --- History of arts
Added to DOAB on : 2020-05-04 10:28:05
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This book argues that the impressive range of belongings that can be connected to Duchess Matilda Plantagenet allows us to perceive elite women’s performance of power, even when they are largely absent from the official documentary record.

The Agency of Things in Medieval and Early Modern Art

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9781138054226 Year: Pages: 220 Language: English
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Subject: History of arts --- Anthropology --- Ethnology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2020-08-07 23:58:56
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This volume explores the late medieval and early modern periods from the perspective of objects. While the agency of things has been studied in anthropology and archaeology, it is an innovative approach for art historical investigations. Each contributor takes as a point of departure active things: objects that were collected, exchanged, held in hand, carried on a body, assembled, cared for or pawned. Through a series of case studies set in various geographic locations, this volume examines a rich variety of systems throughout Europe and beyond.

Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture

Author:
Book Series: Manchester Medieval Literature and Culture ISBN: 9781526115997 Year: Pages: 248 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_631090 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: University of Manchester
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-24 11:02:00
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"Anglo-Saxon ‘things’ could talk. Nonhuman voices leap out from the Exeter Book Riddles, telling us how they were made or how they behave. The Franks Casket is a box of bone that alludes to its former fate as a whale that swam aground onto the shingle, and the Ruthwell monument is a stone column that speaks as if it were living wood, or a wounded body. In this book, James Paz uncovers the voice and agency that these nonhuman things have across Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture. He makes a new contribution to ‘thing theory’ and rethinks conventional divisions between animate human subjects and inanimate nonhuman objects in the early Middle Ages. Anglo-Saxon writers and craftsmen describe artefacts and animals through riddling forms or enigmatic language, balancing an attempt to speak and listen to things with an understanding that these nonhumans often elude, defy and withdraw from us. But the active role that things have in the early medieval world is also linked to the Germanic origins of the word, where a þing is a kind of assembly, with the ability to draw together other elements, creating assemblages in which human and nonhuman forces combine.  Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture invites us to rethink the concept of voice as a quality that is not simply imposed upon nonhumans but which inheres in their ways of existing and being in the world. It asks us to rethink the concept of agency as arising from within groupings of diverse elements, rather than always emerging from human actors alone."

Material Cultures of Childhood in Second World War Britain

Author:
Book Series: Material Culture and Modern Conflict ISBN: 9781138565265 9781351345514 9781351345491 9781351345507 9781315122946 Year: Pages: 198 Language: English
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-05 11:21:04
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Modern warfare is a unique cultural phenomenon. While many conflicts in history have produced dramatic shifts in human behaviour, the industrialized nature of modern war possesses a material and psychological intensity that embodies the extremes of our behaviours, from the total economic mobilization of a nation state to the unbearable pain of individual loss. Fundamentally, war is the transformation of matter through the agency of destruction, and the character of modern technological warfare is such that it simultaneously creates and destroys more than any previous kind of conflict.

Listing 11 - 20 of 26 << page
of 3
>>
Sort by