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Conclusion (Book chapter)

Book title: A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

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ISBN: 9781137448873 9781137448880 Year: Pages: 215 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 91661
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:48

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Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Psychological Illness and General Practice (Book chapter)

Book title: A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

Author:
ISBN: 9781137448873 9781137448880 Year: Pages: 215 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 91661
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:48

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Abstract

Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Special Cases (Book chapter)

Book title: A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

Author:
ISBN: 9781137448873 9781137448880 Year: Pages: 215 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 91661
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:48

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Abstract

Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Introduction (Book chapter)

Book title: A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

Author:
ISBN: 9781137448873 9781137448880 Year: Pages: 215 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 91661
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:48

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Abstract

Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Mental Health at Work (Book chapter)

Book title: A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

Author:
ISBN: 9781137448873 9781137448880 Year: Pages: 215 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 91661
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:48

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Abstract

Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Current Research and Emerging Directions in Emotion-Cognition Interactions

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194384 Year: Pages: 740 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-438-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General) --- Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Emotion can impact various aspects of our cognition and behavior, by enhancing or impairing them (e.g., enhanced attention to and memory for emotional events, or increased distraction produced by goal-irrelevant emotional information). On the other hand, emotion processing is also susceptible to cognitive influences, typically exerted in the form of cognitive control of motion, or emotion regulation. Despite important recent progress in understanding emotion- cognition interactions, a number of aspects remain unclear. The present book comprises a collection of manuscripts discussing emerging evidence regarding the mechanisms underlying emotion- cognition interactions in healthy functioning and alterations associated with clinical conditions, in which such interactions are dysfunctional. Initiated with a more restricted focus, targeting (1) identification and in depth analysis of the circumstances in which emotion enhances or impairs cognition and (2)identification of the role of individual differences in these effects, our book has emerged into a comprehensive collection of outstanding contributions investigating emotion-cognition interactions, based on approaches spanning from behavioral and lesion to pharmacological and brain imaging, and including empirical, theoretical, and review papers alike.Co-hosted by the Frontiers in Neuroscience - Integrative Neuroscience and Frontiers in Psychology - Emotion Science, the contributions comprising our book and the associated research topic are grouped around the following seven main themes, distributed across the two hosting journals: I. Emotion and Selectivity in Attention and Memory; II. The Impact of Emotional Distraction; Linking Enhancing and Impairing Effects of Emotion; III. What Really is the Role of the Amygdala?; IV. Age Differences in Emotion Processing; The Role of Emotional Valence; V. Affective Face Processing, Social Cognition, and Personality Neuroscience; VI. Stress, Mood, Emotion, and the Prefrontal Cortex; The Role of Control in the Stress Response; VII. Emotion-Cognition Interactions in Clinical Conditions.As illustrated by the present collection of contributions, emotion-cognition interactions can be identified at different levels of processing, from perception and attention to long- term memory, decision making processes, and social cognition and behavior. Notably, these effects are subject to individual differences that may affect the way we perceive, experience, and remember emotional experiences, or cope with emotionally challenging situations. Moreover, these opposing effects tend to co-occur in affective disorders, such as depression and PTSD, where uncontrolled recollection of and rumination on distressing memories also lead to impaired cognition due to emotional distraction. Understanding the nature and neural mechanisms of these effects is critical, as their exacerbation and co-occurrence in clinical conditions lead to devastating effects and debilitation. Hence, bringing together such diverse contributions has allowed not only an integrative understanding of the current extant evidence but also identification of emerging directions and concrete venues for future investigations.

Frontiers in Brain Based Therapeutic Interventions and Biomarker Research in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199549 Year: Pages: 107 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-954-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Psychiatry
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Developmental neuroscience research is on the cusp of unprecedented advances in the understanding of how variations in brain structure and function within neural circuits confer risk for symptoms of childhood psychiatric disorders. Novel dimensional approaches to illness classification, the availability of non-invasive, diverse and increasingly sophisticated methods to measure brain structure and function in humans in vivo, and advances in genetics, animal model and multimodal research now place brain-based biomarkers within reach in the field of psychiatry. These advances hold great promise for moving neuroscience research into the clinical realm. One exciting new area of translational research in child and adolescent psychiatry, is in the use of a variety of neuroscience research tools to track brain response to clinical intervention. Examples of this include: using longitudinal neuroimaging techniques to track changes in white matter microstructure following a training intervention for children with poor reading skills, or using functional imaging to compare brain activity before and after children with bipolar disorder begin taking psychotropic medication treatment. Brain stimulation is another cutting-edge research area where brain response to therapeutic intervention can be closely tracked with electroencephalography or other brain imaging modalities. Research using neuroscience tools to track brain response to clinical interventions is beginning to yield novel insights into the etiopathogenesis of psychiatric illness, and is providing preliminary feedback around how therapeutic interventions work in the brain to bring about symptom improvement. Using these novel approaches, neuroscience research may soon move into the clinical realm to target early pathophysiology, and tailor treatments to both individuals and specific neurodevelopmental trajectories, in an effort to alter the course of development and mitigate risk for a lifetime of morbidity and ineffective treatments. Excitement and progress in these areas must be tempered with safety and ethical considerations for these vulnerable populations. This research topic focuses on efforts to use neuroscience research tools to identify brain-based biomarkers of therapeutic response in child and adolescent psychiatry.

Psychomotor symptomatology in psychiatric illnesses

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197255 Year: Pages: 137 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-725-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychiatry --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Psychomotor symptoms are those symptoms that are characterized by deficits in the initiation, execution and monitoring of movements, such as psychomotor slowing, catatonia, neurological soft signs (NSS), reduction in motor activity or extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). These symptoms have not always received the attention they deserve although they can be observed in a wide range of psychiatric illnesses, including mood disorders, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, pervasive developmental disorders and personality disorders. Nevertheless, these symptoms seem to have prognostic value on clinical and functional outcome in several pathologies. In the late 19th century, the founding fathers of modern psychiatry (including Kahlbaum, Wernicke, Kraepelin and Bleuler) had a strong focus on psychomotor abnormalities in their description and definitions of psychiatric illnesses and systematically recognized these as core features of several psychiatric pathologies. Nevertheless, emphasis on these symptoms has reduced substantially since the emergence of psychopharmacology, given the association between antipsychotics or antidepressants and medication-induced motor deficits. This has resulted in the general idea that most if not all psychomotor deficits were merely side effects of their treatment rather than intrinsic features of the illness. Yet, the last two decades a renewed interest in these deficits can be observed and has yielded an exponential growth of research into these psychomotor symptoms in several psychiatric illnesses. This recent evolution is also reflected in the increased appreciation of these symptoms in the DSM-5. As a result of this increased focus, new insights into the clinical and demographical presentation, the etiology, the course, the prognostic value as well as treatment aspects of psychomotor symptomatology in different illnesses has emerged. Still, many new questions arise from these findings. This research topic is comprised of all types of contributions (original research, reviews, and opinion piece) with a focus on psychomotor symptomatology in a psychiatric illness, especially research focusing on one or more of the following topics: the clinical presentation of the psychomotor syndrome; the course through the illness; the diagnostical specificity of the syndrome; the underlying neurobiological or neuropsychological processes; new assessment techniques; pharmacological or non-pharmacological treatment strategies.

Gluten-Free Diet

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ISBN: 9783038977360 9783038977377 Year: Pages: 318 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-737-7 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-25 16:37:17
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In the last few years, an increasing number of individuals have adopted a gluten free diet (GFD). A significant proportion of that includes patients affected by celiac disease (CD), who have to follow a strict GFD for medical purposes. However, a high number of individuals are currently following a GFD without medical counseling and without a specific diagnosis needing a gluten withdrawal from the diet. This is due to the frequently incorrect information diffused on the Internet and mass media on the topic of GFD. For these reasons, research on the GFD and its clinical use and biological effects is urgently needed.

Keywords

Celiac Disease --- depression --- gluten-free diet --- dietary adherence --- gluten --- gastric emptying --- cholecyst --- celiac disease --- non celiac gluten sensitivity --- gluten-free diet --- gastrointestinal symptoms --- quality of life --- Brazilian CD-QoL --- quality of life --- celiac disease --- questionnaire --- coeliac disease --- celiac disease --- gluten --- gluten-free diet --- fortification --- micronutrient --- cost --- celiac disease --- diagnosis --- gliadin --- gluten --- glutenin --- non-celiac gluten sensitivity --- oral food challenge --- pepsin --- wheat allergy --- celiac disease (CD) --- quality of life (QoL) --- gluten-free diet --- disease duration --- place of residence --- educational level --- economic status --- body mass index (BMI) --- celiac disease --- gluten-free diet --- gut microbiota --- gluten-free diet --- celiac disease --- children --- teenagers --- gluten-related disorders --- celiac disease --- gut microbiota --- gluten-free diet --- Pseudomonas --- gluten-free diet --- mineral --- deficiency --- calcium --- iron --- magnesium --- zinc --- celiac disease --- non-celiac gluten sensitivity --- gut motility --- gluten-free diet --- gluten-related disorders --- gluten-free diet --- coeliac disease --- non-coeliac gluten sensitivity --- irritable bowel syndrome --- mood disorders --- affective disorders --- depression --- major depressive disorder --- mental health --- nutrition --- celiac disease --- gluten-free diet --- diary recommended intake --- food habit --- body composition --- non-coeliac gluten sensitivity --- gluten --- wheat --- low FODMAP diet --- irritable bowel syndrome --- beta cell --- beta-cell stress --- celiac disease --- gluten-free diet --- high-fat diet-induced obesity --- intestinal permeability --- islet of Langerhans --- NOD mouse --- type 1 diabetes --- type 2 diabetes --- FODMAP intake --- celiac disease --- irritable bowel syndrome --- gluten-free diet --- gastrointestinal symptoms --- celiac disease --- gluten-free diet --- effectiveness --- adherence --- nutritionists --- clinic --- serology --- duodenal biopsies --- structured questionnaires --- peptides derived from gluten in faeces and urine --- gluten --- adherence --- serology --- villous atrophy --- mucosal recovery --- threshold --- celiac disease --- body composition --- gluten free diet --- children --- celiac disease --- gluten --- gluten-free diet --- screening --- outcome --- gluten sensitivity --- osteoporosis --- non-celiac gluten sensitivity --- gluten re-introduction --- gluten-free diet --- gastrointestinal symptoms --- celiac disease --- ?-gliadin --- 33-mer --- DQ2.5-glia-?1 --- DQ2.5-glia-?2 --- DQ2.5-glia-?3 epitopes --- wheat species --- n/a --- gluten --- gluten-free diet --- coeliac disease --- non-celiac gluten sensitivity --- non-coeliac wheat sensitivity --- gliadin --- microbiota

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