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Didactic classroom studies

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ISBN: 9789188661500 9789188661456 Year: Pages: 244 DOI: 10.21525/kriterium.14 Language: English
Publisher: Kriterium
Subject: Education
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-18 12:10:57
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"In the anthology Didactic classroom studies. A potential research direction didactic classroom studies are characterized and discussed in relation to, on the one hand, didactics and, on the other hand, classroom studies. It is argued that classroom studies has particular potential for realizing the ambitions that constitute didactics in empirical studies – to simultaneously focus processes of teaching and learning as well as the content of these processes and how they interact, and at the same time emphasize that teaching and learning as classroom work is intentional and flows towards specific goals. Classroom studies are not limited to pay (empirical) attention to the student, teacher or content, but have the capacity to focus on how these aspects interact and depend on each other. The research is delimited in contextual and situational terms of teaching-learning wholes, rather than primarily in terms of components (e.g., student, teacher or content). This translates to that classroom studies can capture and examine teaching and learning processes including their dependence of specific contexts in which they are conducted. The potential that lies in the work of classroom studies for didactics is attended to and described in more detail than previous research has done along with a set of example studies, which is a significant contribution of the anthology as a whole. The book gives examples of eight different classroom studies that focus different content areas with varied but related theoretical perspectives and specific methodological approaches. Through these concrete examples, as described and discussed in relation to each other in two concluding commentary chapter, the didactic value of the studies is made visible and didactic classroom studies are described as constituting ‘a potential research direction’. Through a detailed analysis of the chapters with empirical studies – in terms of their research questions and knowledge interests, research contexts, theoretical and analytical perspectives, specific empirical designs and didactical consequences – a number of issues are identified that could be addressed and further developed. In this way, the volume contributes not only to identifying didactic classroom studies as a potentially central research focus in educational science but also outlines a further direction for this research."

Students at Risk of School Failure

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455911 Year: Pages: 594 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-591-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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The main objective of this Research Topic is to determine the conditions that place students at risk of school failure, identifying student and context variables.In spite of the fact that there is currently little doubt about how one learns and how to teach, in some countries of the “developed world,” there is still there is a high rate of school failure. Although the term “school failure” is a very complex construct, insofar as its causes, consequences, and development, from the field of educational psychology, the construct “student engagement” has recently gained special interest in an attempt to deal with the serious problem of school failure. School engagement builds on the anatomy of the students’ involvement in school and describes their feelings, behaviors, and thoughts about their school experiences. So, engagement is an important component of students’ school experience, with a close relationship to achievement and school failure. Children who self-set academic goals, attend school regularly and on time, behave well in class, complete their homework, and study at home are likely to interact adequately with the school social and physical environments and perform well in school. In contrast, children who miss school are more likely to display disruptive behaviors in class, miss homework frequently, exhibit violent behaviors on the playground, fail subjects, be retained and, if the behaviors persist, quit school. Moreover, engagement should also be considered as an important school outcome, eliciting more or less supportive reactions from educators. For example, children who display school-engaged behaviors are likely to receive motivational and instructional support from their teachers. The opposite may also be true. But what makes student engage more or less? The relevant literature indicates that personal variables (e.g., sensory, motor, neurodevelopmental, cognitive, motivational, emotional, behavior problems, learning difficulties, addictions), social and/or cultural variables (e.g., negative family conditions, child abuse, cultural deprivation, ethnic conditions, immigration), or school variables (e.g., coexistence at school, bullying, cyberbullying) may concurrently hinder engagement, preventing the student from acquiring the learnings in the same conditions as the rest of the classmates.

The Student Voice in Higher Education and the Implications of Promoting Faculty Development (Book chapter)

Book title: Employability & Competences

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Book Series: Studies on Adult Learning and Education ISSN: 27045781 ISBN: 9788864536729 Year: Volume: 8 DOI: 10.36253/978-88-6453-672-9.09
Publisher: Firenze University Press
Subject: Education
Added to DOAB on : 2020-11-26 10:21:35
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This chapter presents a literature overview of the student voice in higher education, the main results from a three-year research project conducted at five Italian universities with the aim of investigating students’ voices in higher education and how they offer insight into fostering Faculty Development

What Is the Role for Effective Pedagogy In Contemporary Higher Education?

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455898 Year: Pages: 101 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-589-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Education --- Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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The number of students entering into Higher Education (HE) continues to grow and as such the sector now stands at the threshold of a major shift in its philosophy. No longer does the academic prerogative belong to a generation who valued learning for the sake of enlightenment. Many contemporary undergraduate students enter their programmes of study with a primary desire to improve their position on the subsequent employability market. Universities have been quick to meet this need and institutional offerings have followed suit, enabling students to gain experience in a range of additional and subsidiary programmes that focus on the provision of 'value added' benefits. Here, students are encouraged to develop expertise in a range of topics from entrepreneurship and enterprise to intellectual property and even leadership skills. The first round of casualties that fall victim to such a shift are those programmes of study embedded within the humanities. As is evidenced by the falling numbers of enrolling students, the incoming cohort is less likely now to engage with such programmes, while participation in programmes that have a clear employability component has never been so high. To ensure that the HE sector continues to enable graduates to become effective citizens who contribute to the betterment of society a range of general questions need to be addressed. What does it mean to be an ‘authentic' university in the modern era? What are the real student expectations of HE and how are education providers framing and meeting these expectations? Is a new breed of academic leadership needed that will both meet the expectations of the students and guide the aspirations of academic staff? Finally, do we need an opportunity to reflect on the effective design and delivery of curriculum? Should the undergraduate student body play more of a role in the design of the curriculum or should the undergraduate student body play more of a role in the design of the curriculum or should they remain the recipients of a programme that has been designed by subject specialists? The scope of this book is wide but it brings the design and delivery of higher education programmes under the empirical gaze of educational psychology. That is to say, all chapters centre on the impact of higher educational programmes on the student-teacher relationship, student learning, achievement and identity. It is therefore crucial to explore the psychological impact of higher education institutions and how these can then be used to inform innovative educational practice and policy.

Safe Spaces, Brave Spaces

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ISBN: 9780262037143 9780262535960 Year: Pages: 192 Language: English
Publisher: The MIT Press
Subject: Political Science --- Education --- Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-17 11:41:31
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How the essential democratic values of diversity and free expression can coexist on campus.Safe spaces, trigger warnings, microaggressions, the disinvitation of speakers, demands to rename campus landmarks—debate over these issues began in lecture halls and on college quads but ended up on op-ed pages in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, on cable news, and on social media. Some of these critiques had merit, but others took a series of cheap shots at “crybullies” who needed to be coddled and protected from the real world. Few questioned the assumption that colleges must choose between free expression and diversity. In Safe Spaces, Brave Spaces, John Palfrey argues that the essential democratic values of diversity and free expression can, and should, coexist on campus. Palfrey, currently Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover, and formerly Professor and Vice Dean at Harvard Law School, writes that free expression and diversity are more compatible than opposed. Free expression can serve everyone—even if it has at times been dominated by white, male, Christian, heterosexual, able-bodied citizens. Diversity is about self-expression, learning from one another, and working together across differences; it can encompass academic freedom without condoning hate speech.Palfrey proposes an innovative way to support both diversity and free expression on campus: creating safe spaces and brave spaces. In safe spaces, students can explore ideas and express themselves with without feeling marginalized. In brave spaces—classrooms, lecture halls, public forums—the search for knowledge is paramount, even if some discussions may make certain students uncomfortable. The strength of our democracy, says Palfrey, depends on a commitment to upholding both diversity and free expression, especially when it is hardest to do so.

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