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Genetic and Genome-Wide Insights into Microbes Studied for Bioenergy

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450855 Year: Pages: 186 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-085-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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The global mandate for safer, cleaner and renewable energy has accelerated research on microbes that convert carbon sources to end-products serving as biofuels of the so-called first, second or third generation – e.g., bioethanol or biodiesel derived from starchy, sugar-rich or oily crops; bioethanol derived from composite lignocellulosic biomass; and biodiesels extracted from oil-producing algae and cyanobacteria, respectively. Recent advances in ‘omics’ applications are beginning to cast light on the biological mechanisms underlying biofuel production. They also unravel mechanisms important for organic solvent or high-added-value chemical production, which, along with those for fuel chemicals, are significant to the broader field of Bioenergy. The Frontiers in Microbial Physiology Research Topic that led to the current e-book publication, operated from 2013 to 2014 and welcomed articles aiming to better understand the genetic basis behind Bioenergy production. It invited genetic studies of microbes already used or carrying the potential to be used for bioethanol, biobutanol, biodiesel, and fuel gas production, as also of microbes posing as promising new catalysts for alternative bioproducts. Any research focusing on the systems biology of such microbes, gene function and regulation, genetic and/or genomic tool development, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology leading to strain optimization, was considered highly relevant to the topic. Likewise, bioinformatic analyses and modeling pertaining to gene network prediction and function were also desirable and therefore invited in the thematic forum. Upon e-book development today, we, at the editorial, strongly believe that all articles presented herein – original research papers, reviews, perspectives and a technology report – significantly contribute to the emerging insights regarding microbial-derived energy production. Katherine M. Pappas, 2016

Biotechnology of Microalgae, Based on Molecular Biology and Biochemistry of Eukaryotic Algae and Cyanobacteria

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451296 Year: Pages: 184 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-129-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
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Bioechnology of microalgae takes much attention because of their ability to utilize light energy and fix CO2. Research in biotechnology of microalgae including eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria is an important and attractive topic which attracts the interests of the public widely. This Research Topic aims to create a collection approaching biotechnology and biology of eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria. Basic science of molecular biology and biochemistry is indispensable for proceeding future application of microalgae, and hence, the title includes "molecular biology" and "biochemistry". Broad range of basic and applied science of microalgae is appreciated in this special topic.

Engineering the Plant Factory for the Production of Biologics and Small-Molecule Medicines

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450510 Year: Pages: 377 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-051-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Biotechnology --- General and Civil Engineering --- Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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Plant gene transfer achieved in the early ‘80s paved the way for the exploitation of the potential of gene engineering to add novel agronomic traits and/or to design plants as factories for high added value molecules. For this latter area of research, the term "Molecular Farming" was coined in reference to agricultural applications in that major crops like maize and tobacco were originally used basically for pharma applications. The concept of the “green biofactory” implies different advantages over the typical cell factories based on animal cell or microbial cultures already when considering the investment and managing costs of fermenters. Although yield, stability, and quality of the molecules may vary among different heterologous systems and plants are competitive on a case-to-case basis, still the “plant factory” attracts scientists and technologists for the challenging features of low production cost, product safety and easy scale up. Once engineered, a plant is among the cheapest and easiest eukaryotic system to be bred with simple know-how, using nutrients, water and light. Molecules that are currently being produced in plants vary from industrial and pharmaceutical proteins, including medical diagnostics proteins and vaccine antigens, to nutritional supplements such as vitamins, carbohydrates and biopolymers. Convergence among disciplines as distant as plant physiology and pharmacology and, more recently, as omic sciences, bioinformatics and nanotechnology, increases the options of research on the plant cell factory. “Farming for Pharming” biologics and small-molecule medicines is a challenging area of plant biotechnology that may break the limits of current standard production technologies. The recent success on Ebola fighting with plant-made antibodies put a spotlight on the enormous potential of next generation herbal medicines made especially in the name of the guiding principle of reduction of costs, hence reduction of disparities of health rights and as a tool to guarantee adequate health protection in developing countries.Plant gene transfer achieved in the early ‘80s paved the way for the exploitation of the potential of gene engineering to add novel agronomic traits and/or to design plants as factories for high added value molecules. For this latter area of research, the term "Molecular Farming" was coined in reference to agricultural applications in that major crops like maize and tobacco were originally used basically for pharma applications. The concept of the “green biofactory” implies different advantages over the typical cell factories based on animal cell or microbial cultures already when considering the investment and managing costs of fermenters. Although yield, stability, and quality of the molecules may vary among different heterologous systems and plants are competitive on a case-to-case basis, still the “plant factory” attracts scientists and technologists for the challenging features of low production cost, product safety and easy scale up. Once engineered, a plant is among the cheapest and easiest eukaryotic system to be bred with simple know-how, using nutrients, water and light. Molecules that are currently being produced in plants vary from industrial and pharmaceutical proteins, including medical diagnostics proteins and vaccine antigens, to nutritional supplements such as vitamins, carbohydrates and biopolymers. Convergence among disciplines as distant as plant physiology and pharmacology and, more recently, as omic sciences, bioinformatics and nanotechnology, increases the options of research on the plant cell factory. “Farming for Pharming” biologics and small-molecule medicines is a challenging area of plant biotechnology that may break the limits of current standard production technologies. The recent success on Ebola fighting with plant-made antibodies put a spotlight on the enormous potential of next generation herbal medicines made especially in the name of the guiding principle of reduction of costs, hence reduction of disparities of health rights and as a tool to guarantee adequate health protection in developing countries.

Yeast Biotechnology

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ISBN: 9783038424437 9783038424420 Year: Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-28 09:30:16
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Yeasts are truly fascinating microorganisms. Due to their diverse and dynamic activities, they have been used for the production of many interesting products, such as beer, wine, bread, biofuels, and biopharmaceuticals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (brewers’ or bakers’ yeast) is the yeast species that is surely the most exploited by man. Saccharomyces is a top choice organism for industrial applications, although its use for producing beer dates back to at least the 6th millennium BC. Bakers’ yeast has been a cornerstone of modern biotechnology, enabling the development of efficient production processes. Today, diverse yeast species are explored for industrial applications. This Special Issue is focused on some recent developments of yeast biotechnology, i.e., bioethanol, wine and beer, and enzyme production. Additionally, the new field of yeast nanobiotechnology is introduced and reviewed.

Biofuels and Biochemicals Production

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ISBN: 9783038425540 9783038425557 Year: Pages: 196 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-555-7 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-10 12:39:10
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The high demand and depletion of petroleum reserves and the associated impact on the environment, together with volatility in the energy market price over the past three decades, have led to tremendous efforts in bio-based research activities, especially in biofuels and biochemicals. Most people associate petroleum with gasoline, however, approximately 6000 petroleum-derived products are available on the market today. Ironically, these petroleum-derived products have not elicited a high level of interest among the populace and media due, in part, to little awareness of the origins of these important products. Given the finite nature of petroleum, it is critical to devote substantial amounts of energy and resources on the development of renewable chemicals, as is currently done for fuels. Theoretically, the bioproduction of gasoline-like fuels and the 6000 petroleum-derived products are within the realm of possibility since our aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems contain abundant and diverse microorganisms capable of catalyzing unlimited numbers of reactions. Moreover, the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have evolved to the point that a wide range of microorganisms can be enticed or manipulated to catalyze foreign, or improve indigenous, biosynthetic reactions. To increase the concentration of products of interest and to ensure consistent productivity and yield, compatible fermentation processes must be used. Greater agricultural and chemical production during the past three decades, due in part to population increase and industrialization, has generated increasing levels of waste, which must be treated prior to discharge into waterways or wastewater treatment plants. Thus, in addition to the need to understand the physiology and metabolism of microbial catalysts of biotechnological significance, development of cost-effective fermentation strategies to produce biofuels and chemicals of interests while generating minimal waste, or better yet, converting waste into value-added products, is crucial. In this Special Issue, we invite authors to submit original research and review articles that increase our understanding of fermentation technology vis-à-vis production of liquid biofuels and biochemicals, and fermentation strategies that alleviate product toxicity to the fermenting microorganism while enhancing productivity. Further, original research articles and reviews focused on anaerobic digestion, production of gaseous biofuels, fermentation optimization using modelling and simulations, metabolic engineering, or development of tailor-made fermentation processes are welcome.

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