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De la genèse de la langue à Internet

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ISBN: 9783034317986 9783035307016 9783035397833 Year: DOI: 10.3726/9783035307016 Language: French
Publisher: Peter Lang International Academic Publishing Group Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 103676
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-24 11:21:03
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Ce recueil d’articles regroupe une sélection des communications présentées au colloque international et pluridisciplinaire tenu à Oxford en janvier 2013, que complètent quelques contributions d’éminents chercheurs sur l’évolution du français, depuis ses origines jusqu’à ses développements liés à l’influence d’Internet. Les auteurs de ce volume s’intéressent à la langue française sous toutes ses formes et dans toutes ses représentations, dans le cinéma ou dans la littérature, et l’abordent aussi bien à travers sa syntaxe, son lexique, sa phonologie, que dans ses modalités orales ou écrites. De la rencontre de ces différents éclairages émerge un portrait de la langue française du XXIe siècle, telle qu’elle est étudiée actuellement, dans les recherches, dans ses modes d’écriture contemporains, sur les terrains plurilingues de différentes villes.

Clamor Schürmann's Barngarla grammar: A commentary on the first section of A vocabulary of the Parnkalla language

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ISBN: 9781925261110 Year: Pages: 178 DOI: 10.20851/barngarla Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2015-07-17 03:19:40
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The work of the German missionaries on South Australian languages in the first half of the nineteenth century has few contemporary parallels for thoroughness and clarity. This commentary on the grammatical introduction to Pastor Clamor Schürmann’s Vocabulary of the Parnkalla language of 1844 reconstructs a significant amount of Barngarla morphology, phonology and syntax. It should be seen as one of a number of starting points for language-reclamation endeavours in Barngarla, designed primarily for educators and other people who may wish to re-present its interpretations in ways more accessible to non-linguists, and more suited to pedagogical practice.

The Talking Heads experiment: Origins of words and meanings

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Book Series: Computational Models of Language Evolution ISBN: 9783944675428 Year: Pages: 390 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_559870 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Computer Science --- Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2015-05-11 14:47:00
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The Talking Heads Experiment, conducted in the years 1999-2001, was the first large-scale experiment in which open populations of situated embodied agents created for the first time ever a new shared vocabulary by playing language games about real world scenes in front of them. The agents could teleport to different physical sites in the world through the Internet. Sites, in Antwerp, Brussels, Paris, Tokyo, London, Cambridge and several other locations were linked into the network. Humans could interact with the robotic agents either on site or remotely through the Internet and thus influence the evolving ontologies and languages of the artificial agents. The present book describes in detail the motivation, the cognitive mechanisms used by the agents, the various installations of the Talking Heads, the experimental results that were obtained, and the interaction with humans. It also provides a perspective on what happened in the field after these initial groundbreaking experiments. The book is invaluable reading for anyone interested in the history of agent-based models of language evolution and the future of Artificial Intelligence.

Frontiers in the Acquisition of Literacy

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196562 Year: Pages: 112 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-656-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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Learning to read, and to spell are two of the most important cultural skills that must be acquired by children, and for that matter, anyone learning a second language. We are not born with an innate ability to read. A reading system of mental representations that enables us to read must be formed in the brain. Learning to read in alphabetic orthographies is the acquisition of such a system, which links mental representations of visual symbols (letters) in print words, with pre-existing phonological (sound) and semantic (comprehension) cognitive systems for language. Although spelling draws on the same representational knowledge base and is usually correlated with reading, the acquisition processes involved are not quite the same. Spelling requires the sequential production of letters in words, and at beginning levels there may not be a full degree of integration of phonology with its representation by the orthography. Reading, on the other hand, requires only the recognition of a word for pronunciation. Hence, spelling is more difficult than reading, and learning to spell may necessitate more complete representations, or more conscious access to them. The learning processes that children use to acquire such cognitive systems in the brain, and whether these same processes are universal across different languages and orthographies are central theoretical questions. Most children learn to read and spell their language at the same time, thus the co-ordination of these two facets of literacy acquisition needs explication, as well as the effect of different teaching approaches on acquisition. Lack of progress in either reading and/or spelling is also a major issue of concern for parents and teachers necessitating a cross-disciplinary approach to the problem, encompassing major efforts from researchers in neuroscience, cognitive science, experimental psychology, and education. The purpose of this Research Topic is to summarize and review what has been accomplished so far, and to further explore these general issues. Contributions from different perspectives are welcomed and could include theoretical, computational, and empirical works that focus on the acquisition of literacy, including cross-orthographic research.

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