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Breaking Japanese Diplomatic Codes: David Sissons and D Special Section during the Second World War

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ISBN: 9781925021073 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459995 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: History --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2014-01-13 12:33:57
License: ANU Press

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During the Second World War, Australia maintained a super-secret organisation, the Diplomatic (or `D’) Special Section, dedicated to breaking Japanese diplomatic codes. The Section has remained officially secret as successive Australian Governments have consistently refused to admit that Australia ever intercepted diplomatic communications, even in war-time. This book recounts the history of the Special Section and describes its code-breaking activities. It was a small but very select organisation, whose `technical’

Keywords

world war 2 --- cryptography

Alexander Lernet-Holenia und Maria Charlotte Sweceny

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ISBN: 9783205788874 Year: Pages: 462 DOI: 10.26530/oapen_574653 Language: German
Publisher: Böhlau Grant: Austrian Science Fund - D 4364
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2015-09-07 11:01:16
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In the centre of this study stand some 154 letters exchanged between the Austrian writer Alexander Lernet-Holenia (1897-1976) and Maria Charlotte ("Lotte") Sweceny (née Stein, 1904-1956), the co-proprietor of the Viennese publishing house Manz, between 1938 and 1945. The transcripts are followed by a commentary that aims to elucidate the historical, individual and geographical references. A methodological note explains the corpus' provenance and method of transcribing and commenting on the letters adopted in the thesis. The last chapter of this study is devoted to Lotte Sweceny, the letters' addressee, and her family background. &#xD;The letters' existence is due to the fact that the couple was separated by the outbreak of WW II and continued their relationship through correspondence. In September 1939 Lernet took part in the "Wehrmacht's" raid on Poland and was lightly wounded. As a result he spent the rest of the war on a leave of absence in his house in St. Wolfgang and, after September 1941, in Berlin. There, he worked as head of development of the "Heeresfilmstelle" (an office in charge of producing NS propaganda films), writing scripts himself and evaluating those by others. In these years, two of his most important novels, Mars im Widder (Mars in Aries) and Beide Sizilien (The Two Sicilies), were written - both are today considered as running counter to NS propaganda. Lotte Sweceny and her friends found their way into the set of characters and into the plot of Mars in Aries. The collection of poems Die Trophae (The Trophy) also originated from these years. When published in 1946, Lernet dedicated this work - which he considered to be his best - to Lotte Sweceny. &#xD;The letters contain important background and numerous insights about the genesis and subsequent publication of these works. They also provide biographical details that shed light on the conditions of Lernet-Holenia's life and work during these years. Inter alia, they illuminate the circumstances surrounding Lernet-Holenia's posting to and role in the "Heeresfilmstelle". The writer considered his duties there dull and counterproductive to his actual work and unsurprisingly tried to escape from them as soon as possible. The thesis also addresses certain controversial issues in Lernet-Holenia's biography, in particular his involvement with the Nazi regime and his views on antisemitism: The way Lernet-Holenia writes about the regime and its protagonists in the letters suggests a clear political and intellectual distance to the "Third Reich" and thus reinforces scholarly voices that have, in this regard, already spoken in favor of the author. His use of a certain cipher in his letters even indicates that Lernet-Holenia was in touch with victims (or at least opponents) of the Nazi regime on behalf of Lotte Sweceny, the latter being half-Jewish herself. His personal and private dissociation from the Nazis did not, however, keep Lernet-Holenia from participating in their apparatus as long as he considered it beneficial for his career and/or his personal safety. &#xD;Lotte Sweceny, who was married to an "Aryan" industrialist, came from the assimilated Jewish bourgeoisie of Vienna. The stimulating atmosphere of her parental home was, in part, the product of the commitment of the two preceding generations to assimilate. The chapter also deals with Lotte's marriage with Otto C. Sweceny - a marriage that was intended as a liberal experiment - and with the circle of friends consisting of architects, writers and others portrayed by the Austrian publicist Milan Dubrovic.

Musket, Map and Money: How Military Technology Shaped Geopolitics and Economics

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ISBN: 9788376560595 9783110399264 Year: Pages: 196 DOI: 10.2478/9788376560595 Language: English
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2014-03-05 13:50:24
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Waves of military technological changes have swept through the Eurasian land mass since the dawn of civilization. Military technological changes decisively shaped geopolitics and the fortunes of states, empires and civilizations. In his book Jimmy Teng claims that to understand the impacts of these military technological changes is in fact to understand the causes behind the following major historical puzzles or important facts: the leading position of the Near East during the dawn of civilization; the splendid achievements of Greece, India and China during the axial era; the classical golden age of India under the Gupta Empire; the Abbasid Golden Age of the Islamic world and the Sung Puzzle of China during the medieval era; and the rise of the West during the early modern and modern era.

The Perils of Peace

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ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660797.001.0001 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2015-05-14 11:01:05
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When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

Allies and Germans (Book chapter)

Book title: The Perils of Peace

Author:
ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:53

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When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

Acknowledgements (Book chapter)

Book title: The Perils of Peace

Author:
ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:53

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When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

Introduction (Book chapter)

Book title: The Perils of Peace

Author:
ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:53

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When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

Can we distinguish the sheep from the wolves? : AmigrÃs, Allies, and the Reconstruction of Germany (Book chapter)

Book title: The Perils of Peace

Author:
ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:53

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When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

Public Health Work in the American Occupation Zone (Book chapter)

Book title: The Perils of Peace

Author:
ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:53

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When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

Some Conclusions (Book chapter)

Book title: The Perils of Peace

Author:
ISBN: 9780199660797 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097779
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:53

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Abstract

When the war was over in 1945, Germany was a country with no government, little functioning infrastructure, millions of refugees and homeless people, and huge foreign armies living largely off the land. Large parts of the country were covered in rubble, with no clean drinking water, electricity, or gas. Hospitals overflowed with patients, but were short of beds, medicines, and medical personnel. In these conditions, the potential for epidemics and public health disasters was severe. This is a study of how the four occupiers—Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States—attempted to keep their own troops and the ex-enemy population alive. While the war was still being fought, German public health was a secondary consideration for them, an unaffordable and undeserved luxury. But once fighting ceased and the occupation began, it rapidly turned into a urgent priority. Public health was now recognized as an indispensable component of creating order, keeping the population governable, and facilitating the reconstruction of German society. But they faced a number of insoluble problems in the process: Which Germans could be trusted to work with the occupiers, and how were they to be identified? Who could be tolerated because of a lack of alternatives? How, if at all, could former Nazis be reformed and reintegrated into German society? What was the purpose of the occupation anyway? This is the first carefully researched comparison of the four occupation zones which looks at the occupation through the prism of public health, an essential service fundamentally shaped by political and economic criteria, and which in turn was to determine the success or failure of the occupation.

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