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Changing the Victorian Subject

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ISBN: 9781922064745 Year: Pages: 292 DOI: 10.20851/victorian-subject Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2014-07-04 04:46:33
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The essays in this collection examine how both colonial and British authors engage with Victorian subjects and subjectivities in their work. Some essays explore the emergence of a key trope within colonial texts: the negotiation of Victorian and settler-subject positions. Others argue for new readings of key metropolitan texts and their repositioning within literary history. These essays work to recognise the plurality of the rubric of the 'Victorian' and to expand how the category of Victorian studies can be understood.

Tilting at Windmills: the literary magazine in Australia, 1968-2012

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ISBN: 9781925261059 Year: DOI: 10.20851/windmills Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2015-03-02 06:39:53
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Up until the late 1960s the story of Australian literary magazines was one of continuing struggle against the odds, and of the efforts of individuals, such as Clem Christesen, Stephen Murray-Smith, and Max Harris. During that time, the magazines played the role of 'enfant terrible', creating a space where unpopular opinions and writers were allowed a voice. The magazines have very often been ahead of their time and some of the agendas they have pursued have become 'central' to representations, where once they were marginal. Broadly, 'little' magazines have often been more influential than their small circulations would first indicate, and the author's argument is that they have played a valuable role in the promotion of Australian literature.

Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age

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ISBN: 9781922064554 Year: Pages: 280 DOI: 10.20851/empire-girls Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2014-05-07 06:02:24
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Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age is a critical examination of three novels by writers from different regions of the British Empire: Olive Schreiner’s The Story of An African Farm (South Africa), Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Daughter of Today (Canada) and Henry Handel Richardson’s The Getting of Wisdom (Australia). All three novels commence as conventional Bildungsromane, yet the plots of all diverge from the usual narrative structure, as a result of both their colonial origins and the clash between their aspirational heroines and the plots available to them. In an analysis including gender, empire, nation and race, Empire Girls provides new critical perspectives on the ways in which this dominant narrative form performs very differently when taken out of its metropolitan setting.

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2015 (1)

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