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Political Strategies in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica

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ISBN: 9781607325659 Year: Pages: 288 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_604531 Language: English
Publisher: University Press of Colorado Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: Archaeology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-11 11:01:20
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Abstract

New data from a variety of well-known scholars in Mesoamerican archaeology reveal the creation, perpetuation, and contestation of politically authoritative relationships between rulers and subjects and between nobles and commoners. The contributions span the geographic breadth and temporal extent of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica—from Preclassic Oaxaca to the Classic Petén region of Guatemala to the Postclassic Michoacán—and the contributors weave together archaeological, epigraphic, and ethnohistoric data. Grappling with the questions of how those exercising authority convince others to follow and why individuals often choose to recognize and comply with authority, Political Strategies in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica discusses why the study of political authority is both timely and significant, reviews how scholars have historically understood the operation of political authority, and proposes a new analytical framework to understand how rulers rule. This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

Making the White Man's West

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ISBN: 9781607325635 9781607323952 Year: Pages: 312 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_604532 Language: English
Publisher: University Press of Colorado Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 103443
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-11 11:01:30
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In the early nineteenth century, critics like Zebulon Pike and Washington Irving viewed the West as a “dumping ground” for free blacks and Native Americans, a place where they could be segregated from the white communities east of the Mississippi River. But as immigrant populations and industrialization took hold in the East, white Americans began to view the West as a “refuge for real whites.” The West had the most diverse population in the nation with substantial numbers of American Indians, Hispanics, and Asians, but Anglo-Americans could control these mostly disenfranchised peoples and enjoy the privileges of power while celebrating their presence as providing a unique regional character. The first comprehensive study to examine the construction of white racial identity in the West, Making the White Man’s West shows how these two visions of the West shaped the history of the region and influenced a variety of contemporary social issues in the West today. This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

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