Search results: Found 17

Listing 1 - 10 of 17 << page
of 2
>>
Sort by
Chapter: 'Analysis of Breast Cancer Cell Invasion Using an Organotypic Culture System' from book: 3D Cell Culture: Methods and Protocols (Book chapter)

Authors: ---
Book Series: Methods in Molecular Biology ISSN: 1064-3745 / 1940-6029 ISBN: 9781493970193 9781493970216 Year: Volume: 1612 Pages: 13 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/9781493970216_15 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: Oncology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-19 15:44:38
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Metastasis is the main cause of cancer patient mortality. Local tumor invasion is a key step in metastatic dissemination whereby cancer cells dislodge from primary tumors, migrate through the peritumoral stroma and reach the circulation. This is a highly dynamic process occurring in three dimensions that involves interactions between tumor, stromal cells, and the extracellular matrix. Here we describe the organotypic culture system and its utility to study breast cancer cell invasion induced by cancer-associated fibroblasts. This is a three-dimensional model that reproduces the biochemical and physiological properties of real tissue and allows for investigating the molecular and cellular mechanisms involving tumor and its microenvironment, and their contribution to cancer cell invasion. This system provides a robust, accurate, and reproducible method for measuring cancer cell invasion and represents a valuable tool to improve the mechanistic understanding of the initial steps in metastasis.

Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137487520 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 DOI: 10.1057/9781137487537 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-17 17:40:53
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Conclusion: Death Is Only Their Desire (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Cancer and the Gendered Body (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Referencing Conventions (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

˜It Is, Say Some, of a Ravenous Nature : Zoomorphic Images of Cancer (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Cancerous Growth and Malignancy (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

What Was Cancer? Definition, Diagnosis and Cause (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Introduction (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Wolves Tongues and Mercury: Pharmaceutical Cures for Cancer (Book chapter)

Book title: Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

Author:
ISBN: 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

Listing 1 - 10 of 17 << page
of 2
>>
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Springer Nature (17)


License

Springer (11)

CC by (4)

CC by-nc (1)

CC by-nc-nd (1)


Language

english (17)


Year
From To Submit

2020 (3)

2019 (1)

2017 (1)

2015 (12)