Search results: Found 3

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Leading people - managing organizations: Contemporary public health leadership

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197262 Year: Pages: 82 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-726-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Public Health --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In this Research Topic, we provide a comprehensive overview of current public health leadership research, focusing on understanding the impact of leadership on the delivery of public health services. By bringing together ground-breaking research studies detailing the development and validation of leadership activities and resources that promote effective public health practice in a variety of settings, we seek to provide a basis for leading public health organizations. We encouraged contributions that assess the effectiveness of public health leaders, as well as critical discussions of methods for improving the leadership of public health organizations at all levels. Both ongoing and completed original research was welcome, as well as methods, hypothesis and theory, and opinion papers. The effective practice of public health leadership is a key concept for public health practitioners to clearly understand as the 21st century unfolds. Following the significant lapses of leadership in the for-profit world, leaders in governmental and not-for-profit agencies are required to learn by their failed examples. A major task facing all current and prospective public health practitioners is developing the required leadership skills in order to be effective twenty first century leaders. As a consequence of the rapidly evolving health of the public, as well as the development of the discipline and practice of public health, understanding the principles and attributes of leadership are now required of all public health practitioners. Leadership can be described in a variety of ways. Leadership in public health requires skillful individuals meeting the health challenges of communities and the population as a whole. Leadership may be defined as a process that occurs whenever an individual intentionally attempts to influence another individual or group, regardless of the reason, in an effort to achieve a common goal which may or may not contribute to the success of the organization. Thus leadership is a process involving two or more people. The nature of leadership is an important aspect of the concept as a whole. Submissions relating public health leadership to the management of public health organizations were welcomed. This Research Topic provided the opportunity for authors to consider the concept of leadership from a variety of approaches. Original research papers considering a variety of leadership theories provide methodological approaches to the topic. Hypothesis and theory papers provide the basis for application of leadership to public health practice. Opinion papers provide the opportunity to develop thinking concerning practice of public health leadership.

Fifty Shades of Grey: Exploring the Dark Sides of Leadership and Followership

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889456956 Year: Pages: 141 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-695-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The scientific field of leadership and followership is fast evolving and has seen several interesting developments over recent years. The early heroic views of leadership are slowly turning into more nuanced perspectives, including the understanding that leadership and followership are mutually dependent on each other. Likewise, there is a growing awareness that the focus on the positive side of leadership and followership can be fruitfully complemented by a focus on the darker sides of these constructs. According to the latest research plenty of “grey areas” exist, where further insights into leadership and followership are needed. We seek to emphasize the different shades of dark leadership by taking leaders, followers, and their interaction in specific contexts into account.Accordingly, many of the findings presented in this Research Topic align with a deviation away from the idea of the omnipotent leader. Not only leaders’ dark traits such as narcissism and psychopathy, but also followers’ Machiavellianism emerged as hindering factors for positive organizational functioning. Other results presented in this Research Topic will be fruitful to explain what drives leaders towards dark-side behaviors, the consequences of dark-side leader behaviors (e.g., different types of destructive leadership), and how followers respond to them (e.g., follower attributions of perceived abusive supervision). Contributions to this Research Topic are also pushing the boundaries of current theorizing, shedding further light on the “shades of grey," when it comes to the possibly unintended negative consequences of leadership and followership.In sum, the dark sides of leadership and followership are a natural part of an organizational reality that many employees face day in and day out. The aim of this Research Topic is to encourage an integrative view of leadership and followership and their dark sides, for a better understanding of complex organizational systems and implications for better practice.

The Impact of Shared Vision on Leadership, Engagement, Organizational Citizenship and Coaching

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196715 Year: Pages: 199 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-671-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

According to management and psychology courses, as well as legions of consultants in organizational psychology, shared vision in dyads, teams and organizations can fill us with hope and inspire new possibilities, or delude us into following false prophets. However, few research studies have empirically examined the impact of shared vision on key organizational outcomes such as leadership effectiveness, employee engagement, organizational citizenship, coaching and organizational change. As a result, the field of organizational psychology has not yet established a causal pattern of whether, if, and how shared vision helps dyads, teams and organizations function more effectively. The lack of empirical work around shared vision is surprising given its long-standing history in the literature. Bennis and Nanus (1982) showed that distinctive leaders managed attention through vision. The practitioner literature has long proclaimed that vision is a key to change, while Conger and Kanungo (1998) discussed its link to charismatic leadership. Around the same time, positive psychology appeared in the forms of Appreciative Inquiry (Cooperrider, Sorensen, Whitney, & Yaeger, 2000) and Positive Organizational Scholarship (Cameron, Dutton, & Quinn, 2003). In this context, a shared vision or dream became a legitimate antecedent to sustainable change. But again, empirical measurement has been elusive. More recently, shared vision has been the focus of a number of dissertations and quantitative studies building on Intentional Change Theory (ICT) (Boyatzis, 2008) at dyad, team and organization levels of social systems. These studies are beginning to lay the foundations for a systematic body of empirical knowledge about the role of shared vision in an organizational context. For example, we now know that shared vision can activate neural networks that arouse endocrine systems and allow a person to consider the possibilities of a better future (Jack, Boyatzis, Leckie, Passarelli & Khawaja, 2013). Additionally, Boyatzis & Akrivou (2006) have discussed the role of a shared vision as the result of a well-developed set of factors that produce a desired image of the future. Outside of the organizational context, positive visioning has been known to help guide future behavior in sports psychology (Loehr & Schwartz, 2003), medical treatment (Roffe, Schmidt, & Ernst, 2005), musical performance (Meister, Krings, Foltys, Boroojerdi, Muller, Topper, & Thron, 2004), and academic performance (Curry, Snyder, Cook, Ruby, & Rehm, 1997). This Research Topic for Frontiers in Psychology is a collection of 14 original papers examining the role of vision and shared vision on a wide variety of desired dependent variables from leadership effectiveness and executive performance to organizational engagement, citizenship and corporate social responsibility, and how to develop it through coaching.

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Frontiers Media SA (3)


License

CC by (3)


Language

english (3)


Year
From To Submit

2019 (1)

2015 (2)