Search results: Found 2

Listing 1 - 2 of 2
Sort by
Misery to Mirth

Author:
ISBN: 9780198779025 9780198779025 Year: Pages: 288 DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198779025.001.0001 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-07-25 11:01:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The history of early modern medicine often makes for depressing reading. It implies that people fell ill, took ineffective remedies, and died. This book seeks to rebalance and brighten our overall picture of early modern health by focusing on the neglected subject of recovery from illness in England, c.1580–1720. Drawing on an array of archival and printed materials, Misery to Mirth shows that recovery did exist conceptually at this time, and that it was a widely reported phenomenon. The book takes three main perspectives: the first is physiological or medical, asking what doctors and laypeople meant by recovery, and how they thought it occurred. This includes a discussion of convalescent care, a special branch of medicine designed to restore strength to the patient’s fragile body after illness. Secondly, the book adopts the viewpoint of patients themselves: it investigates how they reacted to the escape from death, the abatement of pain and suffering, and the return to normal life and work. At the heart of getting better was contrast—from ‘paine to ease, sadnesse to mirth, prison to liberty, and death to life’. The third perspective concerns the patient’s loved ones; it shows that family and friends usually shared the feelings of patients, undergoing a dramatic transformation from anguish to elation. This mirroring of experiences, known as ‘fellow-feeling’, reveals the depth of love between many individuals. Through these discussions, the book opens a window onto some of the most profound, as well as the more prosaic, aspects of early modern existence, from attitudes to life and death, to details of what convalescents ate for supper and wore in bed.

Keywords

recovery --- convalescence --- cure --- heal --- patient --- medicine --- disease --- death --- emotions --- joy

An Equal Burden

Author:
ISBN: 9780198824169 Year: Pages: 240 DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198824169.001.0001 Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 480342
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-21 11:21:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"An Equal Burden forms the first scholarly study of the Army Medical Services in the First World War to focus on the roles and experiences of the men of the ranks of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC). These men, through their work as stretcher bearers and orderlies, provided a range of labour, both physical and emotional, in aid of the sick and wounded. They were not professional medical caregivers, yet were called upon to provide medical care, however rudimentary; they served in uniform, under military discipline, yet were forbidden, as non-combatants, from carrying weapons. Their service as men in wartime, was thus unique. 

Structured both chronologically and thematically, this study examines both the work that RAMC rankers undertook and its importance to the running of the chain of medical evacuation. It additionally explores the gendered status of these men within the medical, military and cultural hierarchies of a society engaged in total war, locating their service within the context of that of doctors, female nurses and combatant servicemen. Through close readings of official documents, personal papers, and cultural representations, both verbal and visual, it argues that the ranks of the RAMC formed a space in which non-commissioned servicemen, through their many roles, defined and redefined medical caregiving as men’s work in wartime."

Listing 1 - 2 of 2
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Oxford University Press (2)


License

CC by-nc-nd (2)


Language

english (2)


Year
From To Submit

2019 (1)

2018 (1)

-->