punctum books

http://punctumbooks.com

About

punctum books is an independent open-access and print-on-demand publisher that fosters radically creative academic work across the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. We have special interests in premodern studies, speculative and object-oriented philosophy, political theory, architecture and design theory, eco- and geo-studies, visual culture studies, and queer/sexuality studies, among other subject areas. We are also interested in fostering experimental modes and genres of academic writing (such as theory-fiction), especially those that take up outmoded forms (such as the breviary, mixtape, florilegium, commentary, miscellany, and the like). We publish monographs (especially shorter-length monographs), edited collections, artbooks, and journals.

Peer review info

punctum books has an Advisory Board made up of university faculty and independent researchers in the US, UK and Europe, all of whom have established and significant reputations in the fields of medieval studies, Renaissance studies, continental philosophy, visual culture studies, political science, architecture and design, cultural theory, film studies, eco-studies, comparative literature, and European history, among other subject areas. All manuscripts or manuscript proposals received by punctum are first reviewed by 2 members of the Advisory Board, and if deemed worthy of further consideration, are then also sent to 2 experts in the submitted work's subject area(s), Manuscripts are published after they have been thoroughly reviewed and revised in line with reviewers' advice for revision.

License info

All punctum titles carry a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license; authors may also choose a less restrictive CC license if they so desire.


Browse results: Found 207

Listing 11 - 20 of 207 << page
of 21
>>
Ballads

Authors:
Book Series: eth press ISBN: 9780615983936 Year: Pages: 134 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2017-12-26 22:25:23
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Originally published by eth co-director David Hadbawnik’s habenicht press in 2012, Ballads uses the lyric form to explore the effects of global Capitalism from a sharp Marxist perspective. Recognizing the congruence between folk song circulation and the circulation of money, the “currency” of the ballad alongside supply-side economics, Owens hails Wordworth’s Lyric Ballads experiment (undertaken at the dawn of England’s Industrial Age) as one touchstone. But he also understands the built-in obsolescence of the form, its tendency to hearken back to imaginary origins. “[E]veryone has an idea they know what a ballad is,” Owens writes in his “Working Notes.” “It’s this degraded thing shot through with a sense of pastness, cultural infancy and a charming but sometimes dangerous rusticity that needs to be carefully framed and reined.” Thus Owens’ Ballads playfully engages with language, figures, and forms from medieval and early modern England, with nods to the caesura-based, alliterative line, and Barbara Allan, Thomas the Rhymer, and Piers Plowman making appearances in the book’s brief lyrics. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Richard Owens is the author of several volumes of poetry, including Ballads (first published with Habenicht in 2012) and No Class (Barque Press, 2012), as well as scholarly articles on contemporary Anglophone poetry and political economy. Since 2005 he has edited Damn the Caesars, a journal of poetry and poetics, and Punch Press.

Bathroom Songs: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick as a Poet

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9781947447301 Year: Pages: 306 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2017-11-20 00:25:35
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Bathroom Songs: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick as a Poet is the first book of essays to consider the poetry of one of the twentieth- and early twenty-first-century’s most important literary, affect, and queer theorists. Acclaimed as one of the “truly innovative” poets of her generation by Maud Ellmann, Sedgwick’s work as a poet is, perhaps, less well known, but is no less compelling than her ground-breaking trilogy of queer theoretical texts: Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire, Epistemology of the Closet, and Tendencies. The book includes seven specially commissioned essays considering Sedgwick’s published poetry and writing about poets, by Angus Brown, Meg Boulton, Mary Baine Campbell, Jason Edwards, Kathryn R. Kent, Monica Pearl, and Benjamin Westwood, that range across the complete range of Sedgwick’s work, from her earliest published lyrics through her first collection of poetry, Fat Art, Thin Art, to her part-haiku, part-prose autobiography, A Dialogue on Love, and beyond. In addition, the book contains over forty of Sedgwick’s previously uncollected poems, ranging from her earliest poem on T.E. Lawrence to her final poem ‘Death’, introduced and contextualized by Edwards. TABLE OF CONTENTS // Part I. Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick as a Poet Jason Edwards — Introduction: Bathroom Songs? Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick as a Poet Angus Connell Brown — Look with Your Hands Ben Westwood — The Abject Animal Poetics of ‘The Warm Decembers’ Kathryn R. Kent — Eve’s Muse Mary Baine Campbell — ‘Shyly / as a big sister I would yearn / to trace its avocations’, or, Who’s the Muse? Monica Pearl — Queer Therapy: On the Couch with Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick Meg Boulton — Waiting in the Dark: Some Musings on Sedgwick’s Performative(s) Part II. The Uncollected Poems Jason Edwards — Introduction: Someday We’ll Look Back with Pleasure Even on is: Sedgwick’s Uncollected Poems Poems Forsan et haec olim meminisse juvabit | Death | Bathroom Song | Pandas in Trees | Untitled (Blake panda poems) | Tru-Cut | Valentine | 2/81 | Lost Letter | The Palimpsest | Explicit | Hank Williams and a Cat | Jimmy Lane | Jukebox | Die Sommernacht hat mir’s angetan | Phantom Limb | Two P.O.W. Suicides | Once There Was a Way to Get Back Homeward | The Ring of Fire | The Prince of Love in the Desert Night | Artery | A Death by Water | Yellow Toes | Soutine | Another Poem from the Creaking Bed | Cain | The City and Man | Lullaby | No More Dusk | Ribs of Steel | To a Friend | When in Minute Script | To a Swimmer | Untitled (‘Wonder no more upon the mysteries’) | From an Ending for ‘ e Triumph of Life’ | T.E. Lawrence and the Old Man, His Imagined Tormentor | Movie Party, Telluride House, Ithaca, New York | Falling in Love over The Seven Pillars | Calling Overseas | What the Poet ought And What She Found in the Telluride Files: | Epilogue: Teachers and Lovers | The Last Poem of Yv*r W*nt*rs | Saul at Jeshimon [First Variant] | Saul at Jeshimon [Second Variant] | Siegfried Rex von Munthe, Soldier and Poet, Killed December, 1939, on the German Battleship Graf Spee | Lawrence Reads La Morte D’Arthur in the Desert

Beowulf: A Translation

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780615612652 Year: Pages: 312 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2014-05-31 15:35:35
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Many modern Beowulf translations, while excellent in their own ways, suffer from what Kathleen Biddick might call “melancholy” for an oral and aural way of poetic making. By and large, they tend to preserve certain familiar features of Anglo-Saxon verse as it has been constructed by editors, philologists, and translators: the emphasis on caesura and alliteration, with diction and syntax smoothed out for readability. The problem with, and the paradox of this desired outcome, especially as it concerns Anglo-Saxon poetry, is that we are left with a document that translates an entire organizing principle based on oral transmission (and perhaps composition) into a visual, textual realm of writing and reading. The sense of loss or nostalgia for the old form seems a necessary and ever-present shadow over modern Beowulfs. What happens, however, when a contemporary poet, quite simply, doesn’t bother with any such nostalgia? When the entire organizational apparatus of the poem—instead of being uneasily approximated in modern verse form—is itself translated into a modern organizing principle, i.e., the visual text? This is the approach that poet Thomas Meyer takes; as he writes, [I]nstead of the text’s orality, perhaps perversely I went for the visual. Deciding to use page layout (recto/ verso) as a unit. Every translation I’d read felt impenetrable to me with its block after block of nearly uniform lines. Among other quirky decisions made in order to open up the text, the project wound up being a kind of typological specimen book for long American poems extant circa 1965. Having variously the “look” of Pound’s Cantos, Williams’ Paterson, or Olson or Zukofsky, occasionally late Eliot, even David Jones. A glance anywhere in Meyer’s text demonstrates the stunning results. One place he turns it to especially good effect is the fight with Grendel in Fit 11, transforming the famously hyper-condensed syntax of the scene from a discouraging challenge for the translator into a visually pleasing strength: The eyes of Hygelac’s kin watched the wicked raider execute his quick attack: without delay, snatching his first chance, a sleeping warrior, he tore him in two, chomped muscle, sucked veins’ gushing blood, gulped down his morsel, the dead man, chunk by chunk, hands, feet & all. & then footstephandclawfiendreachmanbedquicktrick beastarmpainclampnewnotknownheartrunflesho feargetawaygonowrunrun never before had sinherd feared anything so. Here the reader is confronted with the words themselves running together, as if in panic, in much the same way that the original passage seems in such a rush to tell the story of the battle that bodies become confused. This is just one example of the adventurous and provocative angle on Beowulf to which Meyer introduces us. His Beowulf—completed in 1972 but never before published—is sure to stretch readers’ ideas about what is possible in terms of translating Anglo-Saxon poetry, as well as provide new insights on the poem itself.

Bigger than You: Big Data and Obesity

Authors:
ISBN: 9780692652831 Year: Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2016-12-18 17:30:48
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In her first inquiry toward a decelerationist aesthetics, Katherine Behar explores in this essay chapbook the rise of two “big deal” contemporary phenomena, big data and obesity. In both, scale rearticulates the human as a diffuse informational pattern, causing important shifts in political form as well as aesthetic form. Bigness redraws relationships between the singular and the collective. Understood as informational patterns, collectives can be radically inclusive, even incorporating nonhumans. As a result, the political subject is slowly becoming a new object. This social and informational body belongs to no single individual, but is shared in solidarity with something “bigger than you.” In decelerationist aesthetics, the aesthetic properties, proclivities, and performances of objects come to defy the accelerationist imperative to be nimbly individuated. Decelerationist aesthetics rejects atomistic, liberal, humanist subjects; this unit of self is too consonant with capitalist relations and functions. Instead, decelerationist aesthetics favors transhuman sociality embodied in particulate, mattered objects; the aesthetic form of such objects resists capitalist speed and immediacy by taking back and taking up space and time. In just this way, big data calls into question the conventions by which humans are defined as discrete entities, and individual scales of agency are made to form central binding pillars of social existence through which bodies are drawn into relations of power and pathos.

Keywords

Blasting the Canon

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies ISSN: 1923-5615 ISBN: 9780615838625 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 246 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2017-11-13 19:09:56
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

What’s left to say about the anarchist canon? One answer might be that reflecting on the canon’s construction can help reveal something about the ways in which anarchism has been misunderstood. Another possibility is that it locates anarchism — in all its diversity and complexity — in particular geographical and historical locations. The canon not only establishes the parameters of anarchist theory, it sets them in a particular (European) context, serving as a springboard for subsequent revisions, developments and critiques. The canon describes a classic form, to use George Woodcock’s term – it benchmarks anarchism. Who constructed it, where did it come from — what are the implications of its reification in contemporary anarchist studies? How successful have recent critiques been in overcoming the limitations that canonical study has encouraged? What are the risks of leaving the canon intact, even if as a target for critique? Should anarchists worry about the explosion of the canon if the result is to include as ‘anarchist’ philosophers or movements who do identify with anarchist traditions? What does self-identification mean in the absence of a canon? Does the rejection of the canon imply the rejection of an anarchist history of ideas, and if such a history remains important in anarchism, how should it be approached and understood? In this special issue of Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies (Issue 2013.1) edited by Ruth Kinna and Süreyyya Evren, noted anarchist scholars explore these questions. TABLE OF CONTENTS // EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION: Ruth Kinna and Süreyyya Evren, “Blasting the Canon” ARTICLES: Leonard A. Williams, “The Canon Which is Not One” — James A. Miller, “Canon and Identity: Thoughts on the Hyphenated Anarchist” — Matthew S. Adams, “The Possibilities of Anarchist History: Rethinking the Canon and Writing History” — Michelle M. Campbell, “Voltairine de Cleyre and the Anarchist Canon” — Nathan Jun, “Rethinking the Anarchist Canon: History, Philosophy, and Interpretation” — Elmo Feiten, “Would the Real Max Stirner Please Stand Up?” — Jim Donaghey, “Bakunin Brand Vodka: An Exploration into Anarchist-punk and Punk-anarchism” — Ryan Knight, “Mikhail Bakunin’s Post-Ideological Impulse: The Continuity Between Classical and New Anarchism” REVIEW/DEBATE: Robert Graham, “Black Flame: A Commentary” — Lucien van der Walt, “(Re)Constructing a Global Anarchist and Syndcalist Canon: A Response to Robert Graham and Nathan Jun on Black Flame” INTERVIEW: Gabriel Kuhn, “Interview with Jürgen Mümken” UNSCIENTIFIC SURVEY: “7 Sages of Anarchism” ISSN: 1923-5615 ABOUT THE EDITOR Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies (ADCS) is an international, open-access journal devoted to the study of new and emerging perspectives in anarchist thought and practice from or through a cultural studies perspective. The interdisciplinary focus of the journal presumes an analysis of a broad range of cultural phenomena, the development of diverse methodological traditions, as well as the investigation of both macro-structural issues and the micrological practices of “everyday life.” ADCS is an attempt to bring anarchist thought into contact with innumerable points of connection.

A Boy Asleep Under the Sun: Versions of Sandro Penna

Authors:
ISBN: 9780692296936 Year: Pages: 192 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-16 14:40:46
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Peter Valente’s first encounter with Sandro Penna’s poetry was while translating Pier Paolo Pasolini. At the time Valente was reading a biography on Pasolini and learned of his close friendship with Penna. Pasolini insisted that among serious readers of poetry Penna could not be ignored. Born in Perugia on June 12, 1906, Sandro Penna lived most of his life in Rome (he died there on January 21, 1977), except for a brief period in Milan where he worked as a library clerk. When Pasolini arrived in Rome in 1950 he sought out Penna to “show him around.” He knew that Penna was in love with the same ragazzi who prowled the outskirts of Rome.

A Brief Genealogy of Jewish Republicanism: Parting Ways with Judith Butler

Authors:
Book Series: Dead Letter Office ISBN: 9780998237596 Year: Pages: 90 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2017-12-27 01:39:51
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

A Brief Genealogy of Jewish Republicanism: Parting Ways with Judith Butler uses the chance synchronicity of the 2013 Israeli parliamentary elections and literary theorist Judith Butler’s controversial Brooklyn College address calling for the boycotting of Israeli academic, cultural, and economic institutions as an occasion for examining possible relations between Jewishness and state-centered forms of self-governance. In an extended analysis of Butler’s Parting Ways: Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism, Tucker shows how the alignment of certain authors’ identities and ideas undergirding Butler’s analytical framework draws upon a pointedly Christian conception of belief. This Christian conception of belief structures the most familiar understandings of modern secularism, articulated most famously by John Locke in his “Letter Concerning Toleration.” Tucker reads Locke’s “Letter”’ alongside Jewish philosopher/rabbi Moses Mendelssohn’s 1783 critique of Locke, Jerusalem: Or On Religious Power and Judaism, and the Jewish tradition of the minyan, making a case for the existence of an alternative history of publicness borrowing from Jewish conceptions of communal life and the proper relations of actions and ideas. In throwing light on a genealogy of Jewish practices aimed at the deliberate creation of collectives constituted by their grappling with contingent, historical time, Tucker argues for the existence of a Jewish tradition of republicanism, of democracy. Within such a context, the Jewishness of Israel can be seen to lie first and foremost in its methods of generating a civil collective out of a diverse citizenry rather than in the identities of its individual citizens. The tradition Tucker has in mind explicitly uses an idea of ritual or “ceremonial law” to sustain within itself a tension between a heterogeneity of perspectives and interests constitutive of democratic process and the forms of unity and agreement often understood to be the desired outcome of that process. By setting forth a framework in which heterogeneity and agreement are conceived as coincident modes of political being rather than steps in a linear process, this “Jewish republicanism” frames law-making, implementation and following as forms of a single structure of ritual practice. Such a framework might provide the inspiration and authority for reconceiving some of the fundamental relations of the Zionist project. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Irene Tucker, a professor of English at University of California, Irvine, is currently at work on a collection of essays exploring conceptions of the relations of culture and state sovereignty in Israel and contemporary Jewish life. She is the author of two previous books, The Moment of Racial Sight: A History (2012), which investigated the connections of race, history of medicine, and 18th and 19th century European philosophy and literature, and A Probable State: The Novel, the Contract and the Jews (2000), which made a case for the links of liberalism, nationalism and the form of the realist novel in 19th-century British novel, as well as in the early Hebrew novel. Before coming to UC Irvine, Irene Tucker was a faculty member in the English departments at Johns Hopkins University and Duke University.

Broken Records

Authors:
ISBN: 9780615949468 Year: Pages: 192 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2017-12-27 02:03:59
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In 1991, Snežana Žabić lost her homeland and most of her family’s book and record collection during the Yugoslav Wars that had been sparked by Slobodan Milošević’s relentless pursuit of power. She became a teenage refugee, forced to flee Croatia and the atrocities of war that had leveled her hometown of Vukovar. She and her family remained refugees in Serbia until NATO bombed Belgrade in 1999. After witnessing the first nights of NATO’s bombing, Žabić took flight again. She moved from country to country, city to city, finally settling in Chicago. She realized — reluctantly, because she didn’t want to relive the past — that she had to write about what had happened, what she had left behind, and what she had lost. Broken Records is the story of this loss, told with unflinching honesty, free of sentimentality or sensationalism. For the very first time, we learn how it felt to be first a regular teenager during the breakup of Yugoslavia and the ensuing wars, and then a 30-something adult, perennially troubled by one’s uprooted existence. Broken Records is not a neat narrative but a bit of everything — part bildungsroman, part memoir, part political poetry, part personal pop culture compendium. And while Žabić represents a Yugoslav diasporan subject, her book also belongs to an international generation whose formative years straddle the Cold War and the global reconfiguration of wealth and power, whose lives were spent shifting from the vinyl/analog era to the cyber/digital era. This generation knows that when they were told about history ending, they were told a lie. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Snežana Žabić is the author of the short story collection U jednom životu (In a Lifetime), and the bilingual poetry collection Po(eat)ry/Po(jest)zija written with Ivana Percl and illustrated by Dunja Janković. She edits Packingtown Review, and occasionally blogs at Spurious Bastard.

Burn After Reading

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9780692204412 Year: Pages: 226 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Education --- History of arts --- Languages and Literatures --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2014-06-02 15:18:24
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The essays, manifestos, rants, screeds, pleas, soliloquies, telegrams, broadsides, eulogies, songs, harangues, confessions, laments, and acts of poetic terrorism in these two volumes — which collectively form an academic “rave” — were culled, with some later additions, from roundtable sessions at the International Congress on Medieval Studies in 2012 and 2013, organized by postmedieval: a journal for medieval cultural studies and the BABEL Working Group (“Burn After Reading: Miniature Manifestos for a Post/medieval Studies,” “Fuck This: On Letting Go,” and “Fuck Me: On Never Letting Go”) and George Washington University’s Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute (“The Future We Want: A Collaboration”), respectively. Gathering together a rowdy multiplicity of voices from within medieval and early modern studies, these two volumes seek to extend and intensify a conversation about how to shape premodern studies, and also the humanities, in the years ahead. Authors in both volumes, in various ways, lay claim to the act(s) of manifesting, and also anti-manifesting, as a collective endeavor that works on behalf of the future without laying any belligerent claims upon it, where we might craft new spaces for the University-at-large, which is also a University that wanders, that is never just somewhere, dwelling in the partitive — of a particular place — but rather, seeks to be everywhere, always on the move, pandemic, uncontainable, and always to-come, while also being present/between us (manifest). This is not a book, but a blueprint. It is also an ephemeral gathering in the present tense.

Centaurs, Rioting in Thessaly: Memory and the Classical World

Authors:
ISBN: 9781947447400 Year: Pages: 116 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-11 18:45:41
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This book treads new paths through the labyrinths of our human thought. It meanders through the darkness to encounter the monsters at the heart of the maze: Minotaurs, Centaurs, Automata, Makers, Humans. One part of our human thought emerges from classical Ionia and Greek civilisation more generally. We obsessively return to that thought, tread again its pathways, re-enact its stories, repeat its motifs and gestures. We return time and time again to construct and re-construct the beings which were part of its cosmology and mythology – stories enacted from a classical world which is itself at once imaginary and material. The “Never Never Lands” of the ancient world contain fabulous beasts and humans and landscapes of desire and violence. We encounter the rioting Centaurs there and never again cease to conjure them up time and time again through our history. The Centaur mythologies display a fascination with animals and what binds and divides human beings from them. The Centaur hints ultimately at the idea of the genesis of civilisation itself. The Labyrinth, constructed by Daedalus, is itself a prison and a way of thinking about making, designing, and human aspiration. Designed by humans it offers mysteries that would be repeated time and time again – a motif which is replicated through human history. Daedalus himself is an archetype for creation and mastery, the designer of artefacts and machines which would be the beginning of forays into the total domination of nature. Centaurs, Labyrinths, Automata offer clues to the origins and ultimately the futures of humanity and what might come after it. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Martyn Hudson is the coordinator of the Co-Curate North East digital archives and machines project at Newcastle University in the School of Arts and Cultures, as well as a Lecturer in Art and Design History. He has published widely in landscape, history, music, and archives. His book The Slave Ship, Memory and the Origin of Modernity was published by Routledge in 2016, and he has two other books forthcoming from Routledge: Ghosts, Landscapes and Social Memory and Species and Machines: The Human Subjugation of Nature.

Listing 11 - 20 of 207 << page
of 21
>>
-->