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Since its founding in 1936 as a nonprofit publisher, Rutgers University Press has been dedicated to the advancement and dissemination of knowledge to scholars, students, and the general reading public. An integral part of one of the leading public research and teaching universities in the United States, the Press reflects and is essential to the University’s missions of research, instruction, and service. To carry out these goals, we publish books in electronic and print format in a broad array of disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Fulfilling our mandate to serve the people of New Jersey, we also publish books of scholarly and popular interest on the state and surrounding region. Working with authors throughout the world, we seek books that meet high editorial standards, facilitate the exchange of ideas, enhance teaching, and make scholarship accessible to a wide range of readers. The Press celebrates and affirms its role as a major cultural institution that contributes significantly to the ideas that shape the critical issues of our day.

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Browse results: Found 7

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Ambivalent Encounters : Childhood, Tourism, and Social Change in Banaras, India

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Book Series: Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies ISBN: 9780813554075 9780813554082 Year: Pages: 264 Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100265
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Jenny Huberman provides an ethnographic study of encounters between western tourists and the children who work as unlicensed peddlers and guides along the riverfront city of Banaras, India. She examines how and why these children elicit such powerful reactions from western tourists and locals in their community as well as how the children themselves experience their work and render it meaningful.Ambivalent Encounters brings together scholarship on the anthropology of childhood, tourism, consumption, and exchange to ask why children emerge as objects of the international tourist gaze; what role they play in representing socio-economic change; how children are valued and devalued; why they elicit anxieties, fantasies, and debates; and what these tourist encounters teach us more generally about the nature of human interaction.

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Anthropology

Awesome Families : The Promise of Healing Relationships in the International Churches of Christ

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ISBN: 9780813536637 9780813540979 Year: Pages: 296 Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100269
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In Awesome Families, Kathleen Jenkins draws on four years of ethnographic research to explain how and why so many individuals-primarily from middle- to upper-middle-class backgrounds-were attracted to this religious group that was founded on principles of enforced community, explicit authoritative relationships, and therapeutic ideals. Weaving classical and contemporary social theory, she argues that members were commonly attracted to the structure and practice of family relationships advocated by the church, especially in the context of contemporary society where gender roles and family responsibilities are often ambiguous.Tracing the rise and fall of this fast-growing religious movement, this timely study adds to our understanding of modern society and offers insight to the difficulties that revivalist movements have in sustaining growth.

Keywords

Sociology

Children As Caregivers : The Global Fight Against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia

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Book Series: Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies ISBN: 9780813588049 9780813588063 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100270
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The global public health community has focused care and funding on TB and HIV in Zambia, but adult policy-makers, doctors, and humanitarians often ignore children's perspectives as they confront infectious diseases. Well-intentioned practioners fail to realize how children take on active caregiving roles when their guardians become seriously ill. Using ethnographic methods, and listening to the voices of children as well as adults, Hunleth makes the caregiving work of children visible. Children actively seek to "get closer" to ill guardians by providing good care. Both children and ill adults define good care as children's attentiveness to adults' physical needs, their ability to carry out treatment and medication programs in the home, and above all, the need to maintain physical closeness and proximity.

Keywords

Anthropology

Electronic Iran - The Cultural Politics of an Online Evolution

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Book Series: New Directions in International Studies ISBN: 9780813561929 9780813561936 9780813561943 Year: Pages: 168 Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: Media and communication
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Electronic Iran introduces the concept of the Iranian Internet, a framework that captures interlinked, transnational networks of virtual and offline spaces.Taking her cues from early Internet ethnographies that stress the importance of treating the Internet as both a site and product of cultural production, accounts in media studies that highlight the continuities between old and new media, and a range of works that have made critical interventions in the field of Iranian studies, Niki Akhavan traces key developments and confronts conventional wisdom about digital media in general, and contemporary Iranian culture and politics in particular.Akhavan focuses largely on the years between 1998 and 2012 to reveal a diverse and combative virtual landscape where both geographically and ideologically dispersed individuals and groups deployed Internet technologies to variously construct, defend, and challenge narratives of Iranian national identity, society, and politics. While it tempers celebratory claims that have dominated assessments of the Iranian Internet, Electronic Iran is ultimately optimistic in its outlook. As it exposes and assesses overlooked aspects of the Iranian Internet, the book sketches a more complete map of its dynamic landscape, and suggests that the transformative powers of digital media can only be developed and understood if attention is paid to both the specificities of new technologies as well as the local and transnational contexts in which they appear. This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

Genocide as Social Practice : Reorganizing Society under the Nazis and Argentina's Military Juntas

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Book Series: Genocide, Political Violence, Human Rights ISBN: 9780813563183 9780813563190 Year: Pages: 288 Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100268
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Genocide not only annihilates people but also destroys and reorganizes social relations, using terror as a method. In Genocide as Social Practice, Argentinean social scientist Daniel Feierstein looks at the policies of state-sponsored repression pursued by the Argentine military dictatorship against political opponents between 1976 and 1983 and those pursued by the Third Reich between 1933 and 1945. He finds similarities, not in the extent of the horror but in terms of the goals of the perpetrators.

The Insecure City

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ISBN: 9780813574653 Year: Pages: 185 Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: Anthropology
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Urban anthropologist Kristin Monroe takes urban anthropology in a new and meaningful direction—the story of traffic in the Middle East, focusing on Beirut. As bombs reappeared recently following an impasse between competing political groups and their international backers, residents of the city were forced to contend with many forms of insecurity, forging their lives amid a contentious, often violent, political and economic landscape. Images and headlines in the news media tracked the dramatic events that characterized this unstable situation, but they did not provide a picture of what ordinary life was like for urban dwellers in a city terrorized by political sectarianism and the treat of bombs. The Insecure City is an ethnographic exploration of the experiences of moving through Beirut. Driving is characterized by precariousness, the anticipation of violence, and the constant presence of class, political, and state power. Focusing on the relationship between urban space and social class, Monroe examines how understandings and practices of spatial mobility in the city reflect social differences. Residents’ access to and experiences of space are framed by uneven and insecure forms of urban citizenship. She highlights the ways in which transportation is about more than merely getting somewhere; it is also about how people encounter civic culture in a city on the edge, wounded by war. Traffic may seem to be an incidental topic for an anthropologist, but as we know in New Jersey it is central to our lives.This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

Nursing with a Message : Public Health Demonstration Projects in New York City

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Book Series: Critical Issues in Health and Medicine ISBN: 9780813571034 9780813571041 Year: Pages: 160 Language: English
Publisher: Rutgers University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100272
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Nursing with a Message transports readers to New York City in the 1920s and 1930s, charting the rise and fall of two community health centers in the neighborhoods of East Harlem and Bellevue-Yorkville. Award-winning historian Patricia D’Antonio examines the day-to-day operations of these clinics, as well as the community outreach work done by nurses who visited schools, churches, and homes encouraging neighborhood residents to adopt healthier lifestyles, engage with preventive physical exams, and see to the health of their preschool children. As she reveals, these programs relied upon an often-contentious and fragile alliance between various healthcare providers, educators, social workers, and funding agencies, both public and private. Assessing both the successes and failures of these public health demonstration projects, D’Antonio also traces their legacy in shaping both the best and worst elements of today’s primary care system.

Keywords

History

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