AntropoWeb

http://antropologie.zcu.cz

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AntropoEdice is a non-periodical (irregularly published) book series, in which original expert articles on anthropology, ethnology and related topics are published in electronic or also in printed formats. The main principle of AntropoEdice is to emphasize on Open Access standards, thus providing free availability of published articles as well as working to publish books with precise and well-structured, formal content. Our goal is to provide our young, aspiring readers with access to a respected, representative publication platform. Nevertheless, we also welcome handwritten scripts from experienced authors. The only condition (criterion) is that the articles' topic or theoretical methodology is close to Social Anthropology and related fields.

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The received manuscript is passed through a double blind peer review process to two external and independent reviewers who write a review for the redaction. The manuscript might be accepted, refused, or refused with recommendation to rewrite. For the publication of a manuscript, at least two accepting reviews are required and rewriting should be carried out according to the recommendations. Manuscripts that are not in accordance with aforementioned formal directions will be refused without being reviewed. Manuscripts that do not satisfy general content standards of AntropoWeb will also be refused without being reviewed. In this case the redaction reserves the right of individual approach.

See also: http://anthropology.zcu.cz/antropoedice

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All of our publications are licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License or similar CC license.

See also: http://anthropology.zcu.cz/antropoedice


Browse results: Found 3

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Balkán a migrace: Na křižovatce antropologických perspektiv

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ISBN: 9788090509818 Year: Pages: 149 Language: Czech
Publisher: AntropoWeb
Subject: Ethnology
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The collective monograph Balkans and migration includes five chapters written by anthropologically oriented researchers (L. Budilová, G. Fatková, L. Hanus, M. Jakoubek, M. Pavlásek) practicing a long-term research in the Balkan territory. In addition to general parameters of anthropological optics and an anthropological field research in the Balkans those particular studies are connected by study transversal theme of migration. While, however, the Balkans and anthropology in the publication are invariant framework guaranteeing the unity of the whole volume, the migration represent in this respect the constant variable. The given phenomenon is studied in case of various groups (Bulgarian and Romanian Czechs, Karakachans), and we can observe some aspects of its heterogeneous nature (post-war migration within the re-emigrant interstate agreements, seasonal labor migration, migration of farmers for the land, leaving the homeland because of religious disputes, etc.). The ambition of the monograph is to justify the relevance to attend to the fieldwork based research in the Balkans, and show why the new generation of anthropologists and other social scientists, practitioners, should pay their professional attention to the Balkan peninsula. Although Western anthropologists have been already focused on the Balkans for few decades, in Czech environment was this theme ignored by anthropologists and ethnographers. They yielded this interest to the political scientists, historians, travelers, and television reporters. This monograph is going to rectify this situation by a series of analyses applying different perspectives of the research. Those analyses are based on the interpretation of ethnographic data collected during the long-term field research. The Balkan peninsula and this terrain inhabiting populations are presented as a stimulating field for Czech anthropological researchers. An attractive topic reflected in those five chapters is the Czech expatriate presence in the Balkans. Until the present time there live several enclaves of Czech compatriots, who actively claim their Czech origin. Those enclaves adapt dynamically to the global political and economic changes. Not only the authors of this monograph have noticed that the science paradigm in the second half of the twentieth century, which is based on a priori national categorization, is not able to capture new social and cultural formations of minority groups living outside their „homeland“. An attempt to overcome the nationalistic classification of Czech (e) migration could be applied and grounded in many identification strategies taking place in the distant past. It seems that the time has come to revise the still dominant scientific approaches to expatriate minorities and expand their attention to the dimensions of collective life reflecting the changes in the last twenty years. The transformation of strategies of Czech expatriate minorities in topologically, economically and politically open Europe (hence the global environment) is a useful platform, where certain phenomena can be observed. Those phenomena produce inspiring issues of sustainability and transformation of collective identities in the contemporary world. Certain marginality of the region including more difficulties in accessibility of resources force the marginal populations to adapt to difficult conditions. These minorities are a good example for monitoring the development of organic solidarity patterns (in Durkheim sense) into more complex social structures, often „aside“ all scientific concepts of collective identification.

Bigbít nebo turbofolk: Představy migrantů z bývalé Jugoslávie

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ISBN: 9788090509849 Year: Pages: 155 Language: Czech
Publisher: AntropoWeb
Subject: History --- Ethnology
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This book is dedicated to the imagination of migrant communities from former Yugoslavia. It contextualizes their imagination in relation to the history, space and culture of Yugoslavia. Its empirical basis is grounded in the contemporary history of the migration from former Yugoslavia. The first part of the work deals with the methodology and theory relevant to the case studies. Besides the theory of imagination originating in the thought of Émile Durkheim, Cornelius Castoriadis, Benedict Anderson and Arjun Appadurai. I have also focused on the theory of popular culture, quoting its founding thinkers related to the Birmingham school of Centre of contemporary Cultural Studies, as well as John Fiske and the parallel culture- -driven research of Pierre Bourdieu and Michel de Certeau. The theoretical framework of this book generally relates to Marxism, and the works of Antonio Gramsci, David Harvey, Immanuel Wallerstein, Slavoj Žižek and others. The methodology of this book is closely inspired by the anthropological tradition of participant observation. The primary sources are heterogeneous and partly issue from the narration of the informants during several in-depth interviews as well as from narration, edited either by the different institutions of the host-country or the by editors based in the home-country. The second part of the book provides a historical and geographical context for the case studies that follow. It presents the contemporary history of migration from the western Balkans starting at the beginning of the 20th century as cross border migrations following patterns of industrial modernisation. The economic migrations of the working classes were supplemented by migrations of members of the intellectual elites who chose merely symbolic destinations for emigration. However, the core-periphery of primarily economic relations of the world-system as identified by Immanuel Wallerstein remained unchanged even by this symbolic logic. Migrations during the second half of the 20th century are presented in more detail. The political turmoil of 1941-1948 which established the Yugoslav Socialist Federation in its position between the two blocs and this point is the essential contextual reference of this book. During the socialist years in Yugoslavia we may identify two main motives of migration – economic and political. These may somehow relate to the previous histories of popular and elite emigration but under the new political regime it changed substantially. These two motives are part of the establishment of specific segments of migrants and their interrelations. Starting from the early 1960s the economic motive of migration gave rise to the phenomenon of Gastatbajteri (guest-workers) that changed the social and cultural landscape of former Yugoslavia, and together with it also many cities of Western European and other host-countries. However, the frontier between the two types of migrants (political and economic) is not completely defined and in many cases the two motives coincided. The coincidence of the political and economic motives for migration may also be visible during and after the break-up of Yugoslavia. In this part of the book I cover the history of the 1990s refugee migrations that were often linked to the local practice of ethnic homogenization conducted by all parties involved in the series of conflicts. Besides, many migrants from regions that were not directly involved in the war used the possibility to obtain refugee status to escape the economic, social and intellectual downturn of the successor countries of former Yugoslavia. Here, the basic theoretical distinction between voluntary and involuntary migrations is discussed arguing that practically no migration is voluntary and should the migrants be completely free to choose, many would prefer to stay at home. Three host countries of migrants from former Yugoslavia are presented more in detail: France, Austria and the Czech Republic. Each of these countries has its specificities in the world-system and also in relation to migrations from former Yugoslavia. Differences and similarities among them are presented in relation to the different segments of migrants crystallised either according to their ethno-confessional/political background and/or motive of migration. Different segments of migrants from former Yugoslavia are formed around different memory-systems. As a first case study I present politics of memory linked to two lieux de mémoire – one in France (Villefranche-de-Rouergue) and one in Austria (Bleiburg). By coincidence both are important in particular for memories of migrants of Croatian origin. The two memorials however, present completely opposing views of national history. Villefranche- de-Rouergue is a symbol for Croatian antifacist resistance and Bleiburg a symbol for the retreat of collaborationist forces of the pro-Nazi puppet Independent state of Croatia. Both of these memorials however, form an example of political memory that even if on the first sight seems contradictory, is by definition syncretic. If the first case study deals with history and memory the second one completes it with the examination of the space dimension. Here I present different images linked to space that surrounded migrants from former Yugoslavia in their host-countries and I discuss also memories of spaces and places in the home-country. I identify three such images – Road, Landscape and Motherland. Based on these images I propose redesigning the nostalgic cartographies of migrants from those presenting world-views of the external researchers (nostalgia of multiculturalism) to those specifically declared by migrants (nostalgia of Home). The third case study is the one that is the most similar in form to most Cultural and Subcultural studies and deals in detail with imagination linked to music. Here, similar to the politics of memory, different segments of migrants are confronted with rock and folk music as well as with a specific local variety of pop-folk. Furthermore, patriotic and electronic music are discussed as well as the topic of Balkanism in cinematography and the communication of ethnic origins on French internet websites.

Malé velké dějiny: Mikrohistorická variabilita dějin 20. století v osudu Vincence Hodka

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ISBN: 9788090509825 Year: Pages: 143 Language: Czech
Publisher: AntropoWeb
Subject: Ethnology --- Anthropology
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Many lives were influenced by the political developments which took place in Czechoslovakia during the twentieth century. Yet with the exception of those “who make history” – people who have left deep traces in the collective memory of the nation – or those select eyewitnesses who have had the opportunity to testify to the “great” people and events in Czech history, the ordinary destinies of individual participants remain overshadowed. Such a selective approach, which is the product of historians’ reliance on the line of official (political) history, can give the false impression of a unified, and thus relatively unproblematic, form of the period under study. In an attempt to counteract this bias, the present publication focuses on reconstructing an alternative image of the period. Using a participants’ experience – the story of an “ordinary twentieth century man” – it focuses on the biography of a native of Prague, aircraft engineer and exile Vincenc Hodek Jr., whose personal and family history between the years 1904–1977 serve as a frame of the presented research. On a theoretical level, the text addresses issues typical of works dealing with history from below; namely the blending, influencing and encountering of the micro and macro perspectives. Thus, even though the present book purposefully prioritizes the personal history of Vincenc Hodek, the starting point for the (re)construction of the period are the events that showed to be of great relevance to the subsequent destinies of the participants. The importance of the context provided by “great” political history, which set the background for the Hodek family’s life, is not downplayed. By taking into account both perspectives and connecting them it is not only possible to trace the individual image of the twentieth century Czechoslovak, as reflected by personal moments of marriage or birth, but also to delineate the individuals’ role in the contemporaneous political-social atmosphere, as can be detected, for example, in Vincenc Hodek’s active participation in the resistance movement against the Nazi occupational power. This publication confirms that the micro perspective, continuously ignored by Czech scholars who have refused to acknowledge the tangible historical matter enfolded within personal accounts, is indeed necessary, alongside macro history, in constructing a comprehensive account of a period. Nevertheless, the book also tackles the problematic aspects of using egodocuments as a relevant historical source. Often criticised for their subjectivity and distortion, ego-documents have regularly been deemed inappropriate for general research. The present book, however, proves that in spite of their theoretical and practical disadvantages, personal histories present an all-encompassing source and, when seeking to present the micro historical perspective, an indispensable source of information that does not devalue the research but, on the contrary, renders a completely new perspective for those chapters of Czech history that have long been considered closed down from the point of view of official sources. The present publication, while not aspiring to relate how the period was perceived by the entire society of the period, represents one of the possible ways of (re)telling twentieth century Czech history. Other than exhibiting the micro historical variability of the period under study, this book also aims to accentuate the possibilities presented by some of the modern theoretical and methodological approaches that, in spite of numerous foreign inspirations, remain rather undervalued within the frame of Czech historical studies.

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